TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Philadelphia Inquirer’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Amazon Unveils Fire Phone | Carney’s Final Briefing

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Amazon Launches Smartphone (GalleyCat)
Amazon has gotten into the smartphone business with the launch of the Fire, Amazon’s first smartphone. NYT Though the device is called the Fire phone, Amazon’s new gadget is less a phone than a pocketable cash register hooked directly into the retailer’s intelligent warehouses. And it’s not cheap. The Fire phone sells for $199 with a two-year AT&T contract. Although it also comes with a free one-year subscription to Amazon’s Prime membership, the Fire phone is essentially the same price as high-end phones made by Apple and Samsung. For Amazon, a company whose previous devices have had innovative pricing plans that often involved selling devices at cost, the Fire phone’s uninspired price tag is a surprising disappointment. The Washington Post / The Switch The phone lets you scan products in stores, so that you can buy things directly from Amazon, using a new service called “Firefly.” Users can even use the phone to “listen” to songs or videos, and link users to places to buy them. It can also recognize art, and scan text such as phone numbers and then immediately place a call. The Verge There’s one big difference here: the Fire phone’s interface changes based on how you’re looking at it and how you orient the device. Amazon calls the feature “Dynamic Perspective,” which basically means that some apps on the phone will have a three-dimensional depth to them, and tilting the phone will let you peer around edges, just as you can with real objects. Mashable The history of 3D-type screens in mobile suggests consumers aren’t interested in the feature. The two most notable devices, the HTC Evo 3D and the LG Optimus 3D, both flopped. The only real 3D success in mobile so far has been the Nintendo 3DS, which is explicitly a game console.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Starting August 18, learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career in our online boot camp, Freelancing 101! Through a series of weeklong webcasts, you'll hear from freelancing experts who will teach you the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and securing new clients. Register now! 

Morning Media Newsfeed: Abramson Gets New Gig | Twitter COO Resigns

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Jill Abramson to Teach at Harvard (FishbowlNY)
Jill Abramson, the former executive editor of The New York Times who was unceremoniously fired last month, has a new gig — teacher. Abramson is joining Harvard University’s English department this coming fall to teach undergraduate courses on narrative nonfiction. NYT Abramson, the first woman to hold the top editing post at the Times, was abruptly dismissed last month by the newspaper’s publisher, Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr. Her firing stunned the Times newsroom and the media world in general. Sulzberger said she was dismissed because of her management style, while other published accounts said she was paid less than her predecessor, Bill Keller, an allegation that Sulzberger denied. Capital New York Abramson, a Harvard alum, will hold the title of visiting lecturer at the university for the 2014-2015 school year. THR “Narrative non-fiction journalism is more important than ever,” Abramson said in a statement. “Its traditions and how it is changing in the digital transition are fascinating areas of study.” Politico / Dylan Byers on Media During a May commencement address at Wake Forest, her first and only public appearance since her termination, Abramson said she did not know what her next career move would be after the Times. Abramson has previously taught journalism seminars at Yale and Princeton.

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Lewis Katz Dies | Carney Steps Down | Zuckerberg Donates

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Co-Owner of Philadelphia Inquirer Dies in Plane Crash (Philly.com)
Lewis Katz, 72, co-owner of The Philadelphia Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News and Philly.com, died Saturday night in the crash of a private jet at a Massachusetts airfield. All seven people aboard were killed when the Gulfstream IV crashed about 9:40 p.m. as it was departing Hanscom Field in Bedford for Atlantic City International Airport, said a Massachusetts Port Authority spokesman. Boston Globe The plane exploded in a blast that sent a fireball and a large plume of black smoke into the air, said Bedford resident Jeff Patterson, 43, who lives beside the runway. The flames rose 60 feet in the air, he said. His 14-year-old son, Jared, said the explosion rattled the house. Bloomberg Katz and H.F. “Gerry” Lenfest won control of the Inquirer and its sister publication at a court-ordered auction four days earlier. A native of Camden, N.J., Katz was increasingly involved with his philanthropic giving. In May, Temple University announced it would name its medical school after Katz, who told the Inquirer that while his mother wanted him to be a doctor, he couldn’t stand the sight of blood. CNN Katz was formerly the principal owner of the NBA’s New Jersey Nets and the NHL’s New Jersey Devils. He was a shareholder of the Nets, the New York Yankees and the YES Network at the time of his death. New York Daily News The Yankees honored long-time minority owner Katz in the Bronx with a moment of silence before the national anthem on Sunday at the Stadium. Katz will be remembered for his hot-and-cold relationship with George Steinbrenner. NPR / The Two-Way Drew Katz, Lewis’ son, said in a statement that his father’s sudden death has brought “an incomprehensible amount of grief.” He added: “My father was my best friend. He taught me everything. He never forgot where and how he grew up, and he worked tirelessly to support his community in countless ways that were seen and unseen. He loved his native city of Camden and his adopted home of Philadelphia.” Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: WH Probes CIA Press Leak | Katz, Lenfest Win Inquirer Bidding | New Abramson/NYT Details

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

White House Launches Probe Into CIA Station Chief Disclosure (Politico)
The White House has launched an investigation into how the name of the CIA’s station chief in Afghanistan was released to the press Sunday during President Barack Obama’s surprise visit to U.S. troops there, officials said. TVNewser White House counsel Neil Eggleston will oversee the investigation. FishbowlDC On Sunday as President Obama spoke at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan, a pool report sent to upwards of 6,000 journalists included the name of a CIA station chief in the country, as one of many briefing the President during his visit. HuffPost The Washington Post’s Scott Wilson, who wrote the pool report, had received the list from White House officials. Wilson included the list as part of a pool report from Obama’s visit to Afghanistan that was distributed Saturday by the White House press office, which later sent out a revised version not including the station chief’s name. Despite the pool report appearing in thousands of inboxes, all major news outlets have continued to withhold the covert agent’s name at the government’s request. Time The CIA official operates under a cover, though their identity is known to the Afghan government. The release of the name is not only a faux pas in intelligence circles, but could jeopardize the CIA officer’s career and safety.

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: S&S Joins eBook Services | Netflix to Expand | Spotify Hits Milestone

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Simon & Schuster Joins Scribd, Oyster eBook Subscription Service Libraries (GalleyCat)
Simon & Schuster has established a partnership with Scribd and Oyster. Readers will now have access to the publisher’s backlist eBook titles. GigaOM eBook subscription sites are still young — both Oyster and the reinvented Scribd, which offer users unlimited access to a library of eBooks for under $10 a month, just launched last fall. In that time, one of the questions for these services has been whether big publishers would sign up. Until now, the only Big Five publisher participating in either service had been HarperCollins. Mashable As part of the agreement, Simon & Schuster will make available its entire backlist of thousands of books. Eric Stromberg, cofounder and CEO of Oyster, framed the deal as a strong endorsement for the eBook subscription market, or as he put it, the access model. WSJ Simon & Schuster and HarperCollins both view the services as a way to jump-start sales of older books. Both publishers have limited what they make available to titles that have been in print for at least a year. The Oyster and Scribd deals are “an experiment, but it’s a serious experiment,” said Carolyn Reidy, chief executive of Simon & Schuster, a unit of CBS Corp. Simon & Schuster also has experimented with providing books to another kind of subscription service, one now called Entitle Books Inc., which lets consumers buy a certain number of books for a set price every month. Forbes The deal includes authors like Stephen King — the most searched author in the Oyster platform — and Ernest Hemingway, who is No. 5. Other names snagged in the deal include Dan Brown, Mary Higgins Clark, Ray Bradbury and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Separatists in Ukraine Seize TV HQ | CNN Raises Ethical Questions | Gregory Slams Report

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Separatists Seize Control of TV HQ in East Ukraine City (Reuters)
Pro-Russian separatists on Sunday seized control of the offices of regional state television in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk and said they would take it off air and broadcast a Kremlin-backed Russian channel instead. Sky News Four men wearing masks and armed with truncheons were standing at the entrance to the building in Donetsk, while more separatists could be seen inside wearing camouflage fatigues. The regional governor’s office and the city hall in Donetsk have already been seized by separatists. NBC News About 15 police officers were standing a short distance away but were not trying to resist the separatists. A crowd of around 400 people surrounded the building and shouted “Russia!” and “Referendum!,” a reference to a vote the separatists want to hold on seceding from Ukraine. The protesters later drifted away, but the separatist guards on the doors remained. One of the masked men at the entrance, who asked why the building had been seized, said: “They show lies; they try to influence the people and they broadcast misinformation.” The Guardian The station’s shaken director, Oleg Dzholos, emerged soon afterward to say that the separatists had brought with them a technician who was turning off Kiev television and replacing it with Rossiya 24. The Russian state channel calls Ukraine’s pro-western leaders “fascists” and frequently runs montages of them with footage of the Nazis. “We hope to continue broadcasting,” Dzholos said. His staff of 250 would be back at work on Monday morning, he said. WSJ Sunday’s incident marked an escalation in the struggle between pro-Russian protesters who want to turn Ukraine’s industrial heartland into a sovereign republic and Kiev’s interim government, which has tried, without success, to defeat a separatist rebellion that threatens the unity of the country. Ukraine accuses Russia of stirring up the separatist unrest by broadcasting strident anti-Kiev views on Russian television channels and by sending covert operatives to help organize the insurgency, particularly in Slovyansk, a city north of Donetsk that has been taken over by heavily armed gunmen. Moscow denies any role.

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Couric Joining Yahoo! | iVillage Shuts Down | Inquirer Editor Back

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Katie Couric Negotiating ABC News Exit (THR / The Live Feed)
Less than three years after joining ABC in a lucrative and wide-ranging deal that included a daytime talk show and a role at ABC News, Katie Couric is negotiating an exit package, The Hollywood Reporter has learned. The move comes as Couric is close to finalizing an extensive deal with Internet giant Yahoo!, according to multiple sources. TVNewser “Katie is an incredible journalist and this was an opportunity that she couldn’t pass up,” an ABC newser in the know tells TVNewser. “Thanks to the powerful association between ABC News and Yahoo! we know that Katie will continue to work closely with us and welcome her on our air anytime.” AllThingsD The deal is set to be announced on Monday, said multiple sources at the company, which could designate Couric as “global news anchor” of the Silicon Valley Internet giant. Capital New York The negotiations over whether she will continue her daytime talk show, Katie, for the network are still ongoing, and the Yahoo! deal does not prevent her from keeping it. NYT The Katie program was among the highest-rated of the new syndicated talk shows over the last two years, but like most recent rating results, the numbers were considerably lower than syndicated shows scored in the past. Variety Couric has always been admirably aggressive about experimenting with online video and social media, so this is no neophyte putting a toe in new waters. But the problem is she is still a fixture of the old media world. Regardless of how willing she is to shed her skin and embrace new ways, the world still mostly sees her in the over-familiar constructs of “anchor” and “talkshow host.”

Read more

Coffee Shop Makes Richard Gere a Great Offer

Our pal Steven Rea, film critic for the Philadelphia Inquirer, shared this great photo he took earlier today:

StevenRea_GerePic

Read more

Pulitzer Winner to High School Students: ‘Look for Stories That You Can’t Put Down’

The journalism credentials of this particular East Carolina University visiting scholar are hard to beat. During Gene Roberts‘ 18 years as executive editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer, the paper won 17 Pulitzers.

EastCarolinaUniversityLogo

The East Carolina native is also an author and former national and managing editor of the New York Times. Given how he was weaned, it’s no surprise that he went on to such an illustrious print media career:

“My earliest memories are of the newspaper business,” said Roberts, whose father was a teacher, minister and newspaper publisher. “My father printed the weekly newspaper on a flatbed press and he used to hold me up in his arms and I would shove the paper into the press sheet by sheet.”

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Inquirer Owners Sue | Munro Wins Nobel | AOL Cuts Cambio Staff

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

2 Philly Inquirer Owners Sue Company, Publisher (Philadelphia Inquirer / AP)
Two owners of The Philadelphia Inquirer sued their company and publisher Thursday over this week’s firing of Pulitzer Prize-winning editor Bill Marimow, in just the latest sign of internal warfare at the storied newspaper. Former New Jersey Nets owner Lewis Katz and cable TV mogul H.F. “Gerry” Lenfest accuse publisher Robert “Bob” Hall of overstepping his authority, and demand his ouster and Marimow’s return. Reuters According to the filing, Katz and Lenfest said that “Hall lacked the authority to fire the editor of the newspaper, a major business decision that should not have been — and could not be — taken without the unanimous approval of the management committee.” Bloomberg Businessweek Marimow said he’s willing and able to return to his position immediately, according to the complaint, which seeks a court order declaring the firing null and void. Philadelphia The fight over Marimow’s job is not a fight for the future of the Philadelphia Inquirer. It’s a fight over how much dignity the Inquirer will be allowed to retain as it slowly dies. And it is shocking how many people inside the Inquirer — from the ownership to the newsroom — don’t seem to understand that.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>