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Posts Tagged ‘Raju Narisetti’

Departed BuzzFeed COO Joins MailOnline

Some big media boardroom news today via Re/code’s Peter Kafka. Jon Steinberg, the recent and former president-COO of BuzzFeed, has jumped to one of the very few other American websites that can rival Jonah Peretti‘s operation for traffic:

Steinberg is running the American version of the U.K.-based Daily Mail’s enormous website, formally known as MailOnline.

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Partial List of Pulitzer Judges Leaks

Quartz has published the names of 44 of the Pulitzer Prize judges who have begun the process of figuring out who will get journalism’s highest honor.

Is this exciting? Not really. Especially since it’s probably not the full list and the judges taking part are publicized after the awards are doled out anyway.

However, it’s a slow news day, so here’s a few of the judges: Raju Narisetti, Rachel SmolkinLincoln Millstein and David Callaway. Check out the rest here.

Jonathan Krim Named Editor of MarketWatch

Jonthan Krim has been bumped up from acting editor to editor of MarketWatch.com. Krim has been acting editor of the site since August 2012. Before that he served as senior deputy managing editor of WSJ.com.

“Since taking over as Acting Editor six months ago, Jonathan has restructured the MarketWatch newsroom to better position resources for speed, for growing the site’s audience through social, mobile and other platforms, and for significantly closer coordination with the Journal’s newsroom and WSJ.com,” said Raju Narisetti, managing editor of WSJ.com, in a note to staffers. ”And under him, there have also been significant talent additions to its journalism ranks in recent weeks.”

The complete memo from Narisetti is below.

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WSJ Launches Blog and Page Dedicated to Entrepreneurs

The Wall Street Journal has launched two new digital spaces dedicated to the world of entrepreneurs. The Accelerators, overseen by the Journal’s startups and small-business editor, Vanessa O’Connel, is a blog featuring content from a variety of investors, entrepreneurs and venture capitalists.

Startup Journal will have a similar focus, and pull all the paper’s “startups, funding, founders and entrepreneurship” content into one place.

“The disruption within the startup world has been closely followed by our readers, and we saw a significant opportunity to provide our audience with more robust coverage by launching Startup Journal and The Accelerators,” said Raju Narisetti, editor-in-chief of the Journal’s Digital Network, in a statement. “This is the latest iteration in our strategy to create more specialized content for our core audience and to provide it in such a way that makes it easy and seamless for our professional subscribers to read, digest and share.”

Alan Murray Leaves WSJ for Pew Research Center

Alan Murray is leaving the Wall Street Journal, where he has been since 1983, to become president of the Pew Research Center. Murray  came to the Journal as a reporter covering economic policy, and worked his way up from there.

Murray most recently served as the paper’s online deputy managing editor and executive editor. Raju Narisetti will succeed him.

“Digital is a land of many metrics, and the metrics during Alan’s reign have been extraordinary,” said Robert Thomson, Dow Jones’ editor-in-chief and the Journal’s managing editor, in a memo. “Our audience has expanded fourfold during the past five years and almost 65 million people visit our sites each month. Each of those individuals owes Alan a small word of thanks, but no words can capture the gratitude I have for his enduring contribution to the Journal and to journalism.”

The full memo from Thomson is below.

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Jonathan Krim Named Acting Editor of MarketWatch

Jonathan Krim has been named acting editor of MarketWatch.com. Krim was most recently senior deputy managing editor of WSJ.com. He had also consulted with MarketWatch for the past 18 months.

“In this full-time role, Jonathan will be based in New York and lead the MarketWatch news team in achieving some very ambitious, internal journalistic and audience-development goals that we have set for ourselves in recent weeks, all part of a larger business growth plan for MarketWatch, the free Dow Jones markets and investor portal,” said Raju Narisetti, managing editor of WSJ.com, in a note to staffers.

Krim’s appointment is effective immediately. The full memo from Narisetti is after the jump.

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Raju Narisetti’s Goal: More WSJ Readers Consuming More Content for a Price

Raju Narisetti the managing editor of The Wall Street Journal’s digital network, has always been a big supporter of technological advancements in media, and his approach is no different at the Journal.

Narisetti spoke about that and how he tries to mix editorial with technology in the best way possible with The Media Briefing today, and below are a few highlights.

On mistakes being made by newspapers:

The sense that ‘if only the economy gets better than print will be fine.’ That’s hubris, honestly, print’s never going to go back to its glory days and those who are not managing their costs and reacting to their current revenue streams will suffer.

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Neal Mann Joins WSJ as Social Media Editor

Neal Mann, a producer for Sky News, is joining The Wall Street Journal as a Social Media Editor. Mann is widely considered one of the best journalists using social media. He has used the platform to break big stories and was once ranked as the most influential journalist on Twitter.

Raju Narisetti and others at The Journal tweeted their excitement about Mann joining the team.

New York Times’ Social Media Editor Moves to Wall Street Journal

Liz Heron is leaving her position as The New York Times’ Social Media Editor and heading to the rival Wall Street Journal. She will be the Journal’s Director, Social Media and Engagement.

Heron tweeted about the change, “The news is bittersweet, as I’ll miss my colleagues at @nytimes, for which I have the utmost respect. But thrilled for challenges ahead.”

In a memo to the Journal’s staff, Raju Narisetti said, “In her current job as a Social Media editor at The New York Times, Liz defined its overall social media sensibility, and established new ways of storytelling, gathering news and distributing journalism using social tools…  Liz also developed strategies for innovating on new platforms such as Google+, and set standards for individuals and desks when it came to using Twitter and Facebook for journalism.”

Her first day at the Journal is April 9.

Wall Street Journal Will Gather Programmers for a Hackathon

Well, The Wall Street Journal isn’t calling it a hackathon, per se, but that’s what it sounds like.

During April 13-15 at New York University, the publication is holding its first Data Transparency Weekend, an outgrowth of the Journal’s ‘What They Know‘ investigative series. The event will gather about 100 programmers who will form teams to work on free Web tools that promote data transparency. At the end of the weekend, the best tools will be publicly recognized.

Sounds like a hackathon to us.

But whatever it’s called, we think it’s a pretty cool initiative from the paper.

The event will be led by WSJ senior technology editor Julia Angwin, who directs the  ’What They Know’ team. The weekend will be divided into three main tracks: Scanning, Education and Control. Scanning will focus on enhancing technology that scans the Web to reveal tracking; Education will concentrate on how to help people see how much information they share; and Control will focus on improving software that helps people control sensitive information.

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