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Posts Tagged ‘Richard Stengel’

Time to Relaunch Time Style & Design

Time is relaunching Time Style & Design, a fashion title that was folded in 2009. The new version will be different than the old in that it will cover a wider range of topics. It will also have a smaller circulation and its own digital channel on Time.com.

“It’ll have a kind of broader palate,” Time’s Managing Editor Richard Stengel told Adweek. “There will be stories about art and architecture and design and technology, and that sort of thing. The previous iteration of it was probably more focused on fashion than this one will be. In that sense, this represents the kinds of things I’m more interested in, the things I think the Time reader is more interested in.”

Time’s Worldwide Publisher, Kim Kelleher, said the new Time Style & Design will benefit this time around from being more of a spinoff from Time, rather than a completely separate entity like the old one was perceived to be by advertisers.

See? We told you magazines were making a comeback.

Time’s Person of The Year: The Protester

Time magazine has selected “The Protester,” as its 2011 Person of The Year. Richard Stengel, Managing Editor of the magazine, says that the “Person of The Year” issue was a “product of a year’s worth of reporting and thinking,” and it shows. The cover is an illustration by Shepard Fairey, and inside there are interviews with the other finalists, including Kate Middleton, Paul Ryan, Admiral William McRaven, a photo spread by Ai Weiwei and emailed answers from Gabby Giffords.

FishbowlNY supports the decision to make “The Protester,” the Person of The Year. It’s a story that has been unfolding throughout the year, and shows no signs of fading any time soon. There might be some who disagree, but what story was bigger? Perhaps Steve Jobs could’ve had some consideration, but the Occupy movement is much more important.

We’ll be honest though, if Time had chosen Middleton, we would have lost our minds.

Who Should Be Time Magazine’s 2011 Person Of The Year? Brian Williams, Seth Meyers, Jesse Eisenberg, Mario Batali, Grover Norquist and Anita Hill Discuss

This afternoon Time magazine hosted its annual panel discussion debating exactly who deserves to be the 2011 “Person of the Year.”

The panelists were comprised of “NBC Nightly News” anchor and panel stalwart Brian Williams, his colleague “Saturday Night Live” fake news anchor Seth Meyers, actor Jesse Eisenberg, law professor Anita Hill, Americans for tax Reform president Grover Norquist and celebrity chef Mario Batali. Moderated by Time editor Richard Stengel, the panelists debated whether a dead person (Steve Jobs, Osama Bin Laden) or group (populist movements, the 99%) deserve to be considered.

Some of the surprises:  Hill had a stern “no comment” when asked about the Herman Cain allegations, though she did say sexual harassment is more likely to be taken seriously now than it was 20 or so years ago.

Mario Batali is a serious dude. As you will see below, he had harsh words for Wall Street bankers (comparing them to Hitler and Stalin!), as well as Occupy Wall Street protestors, saying “it is a kind of a part time job for those guys, they aren’t really playing the real thing. They are kind of quietly sitting around. It is a very 2011 rebellion, they aren’t breaking anything, no one is getting hurt, for that very reason no one is paying any attention.”

Some of the other highlights from the lunch:

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Time Takes on Hillary Clinton

The cover story for the latest issue of Time is dedicated to Hillary Clinton, and the piece discusses everything from the 64-year-old’s relentless work ethic to her many accomplishments.

In addition to the cover story, Time’s Managing Editor, Richard Stengel, sat down with Clinton for an interview in which she explains that there are no hard feelings toward Obama over losing the presidential nomination, and likens the Occupy Wall Street protesters to the Tea Party.

And to top all of that, there’s also a poll that shows Clinton would do better than Obama if she were up for re-election:

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A Live “10 Questions” with George Clooney

(Jemal Countess/Getty Images)

Yesterday at the Luce Room in the Time Life Building, Time magazine’s Richard Stengel interviewed George Clooney in a live version of the magazine’s “10 Questions” feature, and FishbowlNY was there. Stengel used the opportunity to probe Clooney on a variety of subjects, from his efforts in Darfur to why he cast Ryan Gosling in The Ides of March (“I just figured we’d go cheap”).

A couple things we noticed: Clooney is a funny guy, but even when he made a bad joke, everyone — yes, including us — laughed. This is what you do when standing near a super celebrity. You hope your mindless laughter confuses him so much that he asks to be your best friend. Also, Stengel was completely at ease with Clooney. There were no stale or awkward moments, which is a credit to his interviewing style.

Check out some of the highlights from the interview below.

On the state of journalism:
“Part of the responsibility of news is to put things in context. When I was growing up you had three networks, and you basically got the same version of the news from each. Then from there, depending on your political and social views, you would make decisions. Now people go to whatever best represents their beliefs; so I believe people are starting from a different fact base, which I believe polarizes us farther and farther apart.”

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Time.com Scores Record High Web Traffic

Time.com scored its fourth record traffic month this May with 209 million page views and 28 million uniques reported, according to an internal memo from Time Managing Editor Richard Stengel and Time.com Managing Editor Jim Frederick. Of course, a lot of sites are reporting record traffic, as the death of Osama bin Laden provided a huge news boost to everyone. But Stengel and Frederick said the increase over the past fourth months indicated that this was not a “one-time freakishly large bump.”

Rather, the growth is attributed to the launch of several new verticals. “Newsfeed is simply a juggernaut. Techland has been reinvigorated with a new editor. Healthland continues to be a leader in online health journalism. Blogs like Global Spin, Ecocentric, and Tuned In have developed dedicated, loyal followings… And we keep adding to our offerings: Lightbox, a revamped Swampland, Battleland and, most recently Moneyland, have all been successful launches. And there are more to come.”

We hope they keep this up — it’s great news all around for magazines trying to survive in the new digital order.

Mark Zuckerberg Named Time‘s Person Of The Year

Time managing editor Richard Stengel visited “The Today Show” during its 7 a.m. hour this morning to announce the magazine’s pick for its annual Person of the Year cover. This year, the honor goes to none other than Mark Zuckerberg, the 26-year-old billionaire co-founder of Facebook. Zuckerberg also happened to be the subject of The Social Network, a film (loosely, if Facebook’s reaction is any indication) based on his time creating Facebook while a student at Harvard. The magazine notes that Zuckerberg is only a year older than its youngest Person of the Year, Charles Lindbergh — “another young man who used technology to bridge continents.”

As it does every year, the magazine allowed readers to weigh in with their choice for Person of the Year based on a list of candidates including the likes of Lady Gaga and Stephen Colbert / Jon Stewart. This time around, readers chose controversial WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who is currently out on bail following allegations that he raped two women while in Sweden.

Stengel explained the magazine’s decision to select Zuckerberg, noting that, while the social network was created six years ago, 2010 marked the year that it “reached critical mass,” both in terms of users and reach across the internet. He adds:

For connecting more than half-a-billion people and mapping the social relations among them (something that has never been done before); for creating a new system of exchanging information that has become both indispensable and sometimes a little scary; and finally, for changing how we all live our lives in ways that are innovative and even optimistic, Mark Elliot Zuckerberg is Time‘s 2010 Person of the Year.

TimeFrames Reviews The Past Decade In Print, Online And On Your Television

As we reach November’s end, it’s time for one of my favorite annual customs: Looking back. Few do this better than Time magazine, and, this time, the magazine is not only reviewing the past year, but major news events of the decade now coming to an end.

Time‘s single-topic retrospective, titled TimeFrames, went live online this morning and will be available on newsstands this Friday. The magazine has also joined with CNN to produce a primetime show, “TimeFrames: A John King Special.” The special, which features interviews with managing editor Richard Stengel, Time executive editor Nancy Gibbs, Joe Klein, Fareed Zakaria and other Time editors and writers, will air tomorrow, Thanksgiving Day, at 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. ET and throughout this holiday weekend.

In addition, the magazine has worked on an ad campaign focused on Time magazine’s iconic red border.

Further information can be found online at www.time.com/timeframesissue, including a video on Time‘s reporting of the major events of the past ten years, featuring Gibbs.

In his letter to readers, Stengel touches upon a particular duality when taking a look at our rapidly changign world:

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Time Magazine’s 2010 Person Of The Year Panel Discussion: Of Bond Villains And Being Bamboozled

Last night, Time magazine presented a panel discussion on the candidates for its upcoming Person of the Year issue, due on newsstands December 15th. This year’s panel, moderated by the magazine’s managing editor, Richard Stengel [pictured above, far left], included Daisy Khan, the executive director of the American Society for Muslim Advancement and wife of Person of the Year candidate Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf; Democratic campaign worker and political consultant Joe Trippi; Marissa Mayer, Google’s vice president of geographic and local services; musician, producer and one-time hopeful for Haiti’s presidency Wyclef Jean (Jean said he was “bamboozled” out of running); and blogger and author Meghan McCain.

Among the topics discussed by the panelists were their top picks for the annual honor. McCain selected members of the Tea Party and was interested in seeing how those running on an “anti-Washington platform” would eventually fare in Washington, as well as Glenn Beck. Jean picked the people of Haiti for their resilience in the face of recent earthquakes and an outbreak of cholera, as well as for their ability to show how technology can help bring different parts of the globe together for a common cause. Khan lamented that she couldn’t pick Time itself for its recent thought-provoking cover story on Islamophobia in the United States. Her picks, in order, were Mayor Michael Bloomberg, her husband, and Jon Stewart, who nominated as a candidate alongside Stephen Colbert. Trippi, in keeping with his background in politics, selected Nancy Pelosi as his number one pick, followed by the Tea Party members. Mayer, drawing on her own interest in tech, selected either Steve Jobs of the smartphone for their continued impact. She also recounted how Time‘s 1982 Person of the Year pick (then dubbed “Man of the Year”), the personal computer, marked her very first encounter with that type of technology.

The discussion took an interesting turn when candidates were asked to defend one another’s choices (most were not exactly game), and then asked to select their “Bad Guy of the Year.” Khan selected Beck for his stance on immigration and religion, opining that his views went against “the American ethos.” Trippi colorfully referred to the iPod and iPad as “slingshots for Goliath, and McCain felt that Australian Julian Assange‘s decision to reveal military information through his WikiLeaks site was “un-American” and likened him to a Bond villain.

Fareed Zakaria’s Time Column Debuts

Fareed Zakaria has debuted the first entry for his new Time column. The magazine’s managing editor Richard Stengel introduces the column in his Letter to Readers:

Fareed is quite simply one of the foremost public intellectuals of our time. He does something that is rare: he connects the dots on foreign policy, politics, the economy and the larger culture to make sense of the world’s most important ideas and trends. And he does it with a subtlety that is nevertheless clear and accessible. For him, politics and international affairs are complex and gray, not black and white.

In his inaugural post, “The Real Challenge from China: Its People, Not Its Currency,” Zakaria takes a look on how China is investing in its people as the country “moves up the value chain.” This is the first column Zakaria has written for Time since leaving his post as editor of Newsweek International.

Also in this week’s issue, Joe Klein‘s cover story offers a look at what happens when a New York-based journalist criss-crosses the country to meet with “real” Americans in order to get a sense of what, exactly, is on people’s minds as we approach midterm elections. Klein’s 6,782-mile trek is also chronicled in daily entries on Time.com’s  Swampland blog.

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