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Posts Tagged ‘Roger Corman’

Roger Corman: ‘The Time for Motion Picture Internet Distribution is Now’

On the heels of another triumph for 90-year-old Marvel Comics wizard Stan Lee (Iron Man 3), it’s now time for 87-year-old B-movie king Roger Corman to claim his piece of the shifting media landscape. He explains to LA AP business writer Ryan Nakashima why, after turning down an offer from Hulu some time ago, he has finally decided to jump on the Internet streaming bandwagon by means of a paid-subscription YouTube channel:

His channel, “Corman’s Drive-in,” will cost subscribers $3.99 per month for a rotating selection of 30 movies, refreshed with new interviews and clips from films that are in production. It is set to launch in June.

“I believed for many years that the future of motion picture distribution, particularly for the independents, is on the Internet,” Corman said. “I think the time is now.”

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Shout! Factory Extends Roger Corman, Judd Apatow Shelf Life

Any Hollywood company that can claim a 25-30% annual profit jump for the past five years and gross annual revenue growth of five to 10% deserves a media shout-out. This morning, Shout! Factory gets just that from TheWrap senior writer Brent Lang.

Two key assets in Shout! Factory’s retro-DVD arsenal are Judd Apatow‘s short-lived Freaks and Geeks series and the films of B movie maestro Roger Corman. For the former, company execs nimbly worked around some music licensing issues while, for the latter, they beefed things up with old-school DVD Extras featuring interviews with the likes of Jonathan Demme and Ron Howard:

“The DVD market was slipping when we made the deal, but, on the other hand, the slippage of DVD sales isn’t a cliff, it’s sort of a slope,” Corman said. “The hill is sloping downward, but it’s not dead. There’s still money to be made and Shout! has done just that.”

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Credits Roll on Venerable THR Critic Kirk Honeycutt

When Kirk Honeycutt joined the Hollywood Reporter in 1992, his name was attached as screenwriter to the Roger Corman made-for-video thriller Final Judgement (sic). Brad Dourif plays a preacher investigating the murder of his estranged daughter and other strippers, alongside the estimable talents of Karen Black, Isaac Hayes and Orson Bean.

The glory days of low-budget VHS studio production are long gone, as are rock-solid film critic positions like the one Honeycutt was lucky enough to occupy from 1999 through the fall of last year. As first reported by Anne Thompson, the former chief film critic of the revamped Hollywood trade has been given his walking papers. His last day will be next Monday, following a stint as a THR juror at the Napa Valley Film Festival.

Ironically, Honeycutt’s switch to international critic and now layoff was brought about by the arrival of Todd McCarthy, Variety lead critic until a spring 2010 firing. These are different times on Wilshire Blvd., buffeted by the fact that the trades no longer have a monopoly on setting the buzz for major releases with those once vaunted first-look reviews.

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Hyatt Bass Wrote a Novel

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Hyatt Bass had a reading last night at Book Soup and we regrettably missed the shindig. Anyway, Miss Bass of the billionaire Bass family, released her debut novel, “The Embers.”

Hyatt Bass is the first person to tell you she never intended to write a novel. Growing up in a high profile Texas family, weekend activities ranged from shooting Quail at the family ranch to having her portrait shot by Andy Warhol, but she spent most of her time training rigorously to become a professional ballet dancer until a series of injuries ultimately shifted her focus to shooting films. At Princeton she majored in English Literature because it was the only department liberal enough to let her write her thesis on film, and after college, moved to Los Angeles where she worked as a production assistant on Sister Act, a camera assistant on Tombstone, and an assistant editor and camera assistant at Roger Corman‘s infamous Concorde Films.

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