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Posts Tagged ‘San Francisco Chronicle’

For Those Still Unsure, Columnist Explains Why San Francisco is Not New York

ShutterstockHoodieWe wrote last week about the clever and funny San Francisco Chronicle response to New York magazine’s rhetorical op-ed “Is San Francisco New York?” Today, there is a second noteworthy commentary from Nick Bilton in the New York Times.

The columnist and author begins by pointing out that as opposed to the Bay Area, there is no constrictive “company town” vibe flavoring our coffee shops. He also notes a crucial fine-dining difference:

In New York, you see people dressed to impress. In San Francisco, people take pride in wearing a hoodie and jeans to five-star restaurants (despite glossy magazine reports to the contrary).

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Chronicle Pair Offer Visiting Journalists a Ten-Step Article Template

New York magazine recently wondered – “Is San Francisco New York?” From that west coast city, San Francisco Chronicle pop culture critic Peter Hartlaub and staff writer Joe Garofoli today offer up the cheekiest of commentary-responses in the form of a ten-step Cut-and-Paste San Francisco Trend Story template.

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Each and every suggested feature article touchstone is hilarious, including:

Step 3: Find the outrage. Now that you’re sufficiently fired up about evictions, it’s time to write about the tenant-landlord rift without actually speaking to a greedy landlord or aggrieved tenant. The San Francisco Tenants Union, Tenderloin Housing Clinic or any past/present editor of the San Francisco Bay Guardian will gladly confirm that San Francisco is on the verge of doom (just as the naysayers said in 1998 during the first dot-com boom).

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Times, Chronicle Celebrate Rise of Vietnamese Immigrant News Anchor

Over the weekend, Bay Area TV news anchor Thuy Vu had both U.S. coasts media-covered. Deservedly. Not only is she a journalist who recently took over on KQED for a local PBS legend (Belva Davis), but the story of how her family sacrificed in order to provide Vu and her siblings with a better life is replete with American Dream detail.

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For example, to help make ends meet, Vu as a teenager passed on to her family all monies earned from a summer job soldering components onto motherboards at a San Jose computer company. From this weekend’s San Francisco Chronicle feature-interview by Peter Hartlaub:

Vu’s family fled Vietnam when Saigon fell to the communists in 1975. She was elementary-school-age and the second-youngest of eight children. The family was so large they couldn’t leave together, so some left by plane and others by cargo ship. Their only money was some gold sewn into the lining of her mother’s skirt. Nobody spoke English.

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Cartoonist Don Asmussen Nicely Sums Up Duck Dynasty Debacle

From a media insider’s perspective, one of the real mysteries of the Phil Robertson disaster is how his publicists and-or A&E reps could allow the patriarch to head into the woods, unsupervised, with an enterprising GQ reporter. Unless Robertson specifically told this gang to head the other swamp way, there’s just no excuse from a PR-handling point of view for the non-chaperoned nature of that assignment.

More broadly, all kinds of people continue to take shots at A&E for the implicit hypocrisy of being surprised or apologetic for such a predictable, de-facto eventual quagmire. On that front, FishbowlNY thinks one of the best encapsulations comes from cartoonist Don Asmussen, for the latest edition of his bi-weekly San Francisco Chronicle strip “Bad Reporter:”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Chron Cuts Food Section? | Snapchat Rejected $3B | Six Out at Time Out NY

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Stand-Alone Food Section Faces Demise in Bay Area (NYT)
In the food-obsessed Bay Area, the San Francisco Chronicle’s food section has been as much of a city institution as the cable car, and to many San Franciscans, more useful. Over the years it has won many awards and developed a dedicated following. Now, the Chronicle, owned by the Hearst Corporation, is planning to eliminate its stand-alone food section and integrate it into a single lifestyle section — tentatively titled “Artisan” — with material from other parts of the newspaper, including the home section, according to employees who have been told of the plans. The publisher of the Chronicle, Jeffrey Johnson, did not return calls seeking comment. However, the managing editor, Audrey Cooper, posted a response online saying that the Chronicle was actually increasing its investment in food and wine coverage. San Francisco Chronicle It’s impossible to separate food, restaurants and the culture of farm-to-table living from the San Francisco experience. For decades, these issues have formed a pillar of the San Francisco Chronicle‘s news coverage. It’s a Chronicle tradition and, most importantly, good journalism. We wouldn’t be San Francisco without it. That’s why the newsroom has been studying several ways to build on the foundation created by our award-winning staff. We’re disappointed by recent inaccurate reports in The New York Times, which has attempted to compete with us in this arena. SF Station A bi-coastal food fight is brewing between the San Francisco Chronicle and The New York Times after the Times published a report with anonymous sources that claims the Chronicle will merge its standalone food section with other sections in the paper. It’s another sign of the newspaper industry’s slow, painful death — or could it be a power play by the Times, looking to gain leverage in the San Francisco market? NY Observer Although the Hearst Corporation-owned newspaper has downsized in recent years, the food section, a Bay Area institution, has been spared the ravages of the media industry. Not only was the food and wine section located in a separate building with a test kitchen and an “extensive wine cellar,” but the newspaper had a garden and honey-producing bees on the rooftop that were used in the test recipes. But during a meeting this month, Chronicle president Joanne Bradford said that the section was just not “sustainable.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Jim Roberts to Mashable | Financial Times Subs Up | 3 Plead Guilty to Hacking

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Mashable Names Jim Roberts to Oversee Content Expansion (NYT)
Mashable, the digital media site, said Wednesday morning that it had hired Jim Roberts as executive editor and chief content officer, part of its push to expand the range of its content. Mashable’s announcement comes as many digital websites are looking to deepen their content by adding professional journalists in foreign bureaus and on investigative teams. Roberts spent much of his career at The New York Times, where he most recently served as assistant managing editor before taking a company buyout in January. He then worked briefly at Reuters. In both jobs, Roberts championed a digital strategy that included using interactive tools, social media and video to augment traditional storytelling techniques. paidContent The news about Roberts — whose most recent job was trying to reinvent Reuters online, until the wire service company decided to mothball the venture — came as a surprise to many, since he is a veteran newsman and Mashable is seen by some as a pageview-driven source of entertainment rather than a place that does serious journalism. Mashable Roberts: “Although this is the beginning of a new journey, it also feels like the natural progression for an editor who loves the news and loves even more the opportunity to experiment with new and innovative ways of spreading it to an audience — and growing that audience in the process.” FishbowlNY Roberts joins editor-in-chief Lance Ulanoff and a Web braintrust that includes Adam Ostrow, Mike Kriak, Stacy Martinet, Robyn Peterson and Seth Rogin.

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West Coast Print Veterans Win Awards for Patch

Among the many first-place awards handed out Sunday night at the LA Press Club’s SoCal Journalism Awards was Online Journalist of the Year. That particular honor went to Martin Henderson (pictured) who, before his current duties with Rancho Santa Margarita and Lake Forest Patch, spent a number of years working in San Diego for the LA Times.

Meanwhile, a little earlier this month up the coast, Charles Burress, local editor for Berkeley and Albany Patch, claimed several top prizes at the Greater Bay Area Journalism Awards. His resume includes stints at the Chronicle as both an editor and reporter:

Burress’ reporting won first place for News Story, Feature of a Light Nature and Headline, a category in which he won second and third place as well. Charles’s work includes reporting on milestone scientific discoveries at the University of California, Berkeley, as well as fun pieces like this one that explains the significance of President’s Day.

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Embattled San Francisco Chronicle Workers Speak Out on Facebook

As the union for the San Francisco Chronicle braces for another round of negotiations with management, workers have taken to Facebook to express their frustrations and call for public support. Says one post:‎

‘Like’ this group to let Hearst know you stand behind San Francisco Chronicle workers. Last year, when Hearst publicly threatened to close the paper, Guild members rushed in to help. We sacrificed. We agreed to givebacks that cut our pay, vacation, benefits and job security on the promise that the company would do the same. They didn’t. Like Wall Street, Hearst took its bailout and sheltered its executives.

That deserves a “Like,” eh?

Hat tip Romenesko

Good Riddance To The Mainstream Media? Not Quite Yet

The New York TimesDavid Carr stole the show at last night’s Intelligence Squared debate on the merits of the mainstream media, when he pulled out a print out of fellow debater Michael Wolff‘s Web site Newser all full of holes. Carr had cut out every story on Newser that came from the main stream media to prove his point: new media couldn’t exist without venerable mainstream pubs like the Times.

Ultimately, Carr’s side — debating against the proposition “Good Riddance to the Main Stream Media” — won the night, with 68 percent of the audience agreeing that we should not, in fact, say good riddance to the MSM. But Carr and his mainstream-representing colleagues, Phil Bronstein from the San Francisco Chronicle and the Nation‘s Katrina Vanden Heuvel, may have just lucked out. Their argument for maintaining the mainstream media seemed to simply boil down to the fact that there are some good things about it that need to be preserved, and new media is taking the best and claiming it for itself. Also, without the mainstream media, where would the debaters all work?

(More video and pictures after the jump)

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NYT‘s Bay Area Edition Stirs Up Plagiarism Controversy

The New York Times may have only launched its San Francisco Bay Area section just last week, but it’s already finding itself in the midst of a controversy. Our sister blog BayNewser has the scoop:

Yesterday, San Francisco Chronicle Editor at Large Phil Bronstein wrote a blog post that “all but accused the New York Times of plagiarizing a Chronicle story about Oakland Police Chief Anthony W. Batts for its inaugural Bay Area edition last Friday,” BayNewser reports.

The Times issued a release today denying the allegations, and now Bronstein has published a mea culpa on The Huffington Post.

However, although Bronstein apologized for his ultimately incorrect assumption, he did take the Times to task for publishing a story that was basically told in two other California pubs:

Times, don’t ignore all the good things I said in the post just because you’re the paper of record and you can — I expect a lot for $900-plus a year. Like a lead story in a news section that hasn’t shown up, in very similar form (or, in the case of the Long Beach Post-Telegram, in different form) everywhere else.”

Not Behind the Times; Bronstein Alleges the NY Times’ Bay Area Edition has Done . . . Well, Something — BayNewser

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