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Posts Tagged ‘Screen Actors Guild’

No SAG Deal Until January? Hear For Yourself.

105dd47.jpgJonathan Handel does “the math” — which is good, because math is hard — and determines that Hollywood won’t see a contract until 2009.

A sample:

1. If Membership First wins the election overwhelmingly, and if SAG members overwhelmingly vote in the SAG survey (a push-poll, designed to influence people’s votes) to have the Guild continue pushing hard for a better deal (i.e., 85% or more affirmative, and a good turnout), then MF will be emboldened to call for a strike authorization vote. If that vote achieves the requisite 75% approval level (a high level, which is why it might take as much as 85% affirmative on the poll, particularly given SAG’s embarrassing failure to defeat the AFTRA deal), then SAG will have gained significant leverage against the studios. All of these conditions have to apply.

QED

In the wake of his online video interviews with reps from Membership First and United for Strength, Jonathan tells us he’ll be interviewing independent candidates this week:

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Tom Short Says Sayonara to the IATSE

Tom Short.jpg
Thomas Short, president of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (that’s the guild representing all those unwashed below-the-line workers), yelled an outright “CUT” Thursday to his career atop the IATSE.
He offically retired, ending his 14-year stint as top man at the union.
Though he was a powerful negotiator and had strong opinions about union strength, Short had a checkered career with the IATSE, occasionally drawing the ire of other unions like the Screen Actors Guild and the Writers Guild of America. Short was frustated by the WGA during its 100-day strike this spring, because it delayed contract talks and the Guild refused to apologize for the strike’s economic impact.
But Short has always been a man of the people in the IATSE. The former Cleveland stagehand always had an open ear for any union member who had something to say.
On a studio tour that I accompanied him in the mid-1990s, Short went from studio to studio, glad-handing and taking note of working conditions.
“Don’t you just love these people,” he exclaimed at the end of the tour. “To me it’s so important to listen to what the union members have to say.”
Short will be replaced by IATSE executive Matthew D. Loeb, who has been an International VP since 2002. He was one of the labor execs credited with devising and implementing the organizing and bargaining strategices under Short.
“I am not leaving for political or for health reasons, but rather because I have learned that life is short and there is a great deal that I have yet to experience and enjoy,” Short said in a statement.
Short had a year left on his four-year term as president. Loeb has been in charge of the film and TV production units for the last decade.
Membership in the IATSE blossomed under Short, increasing more than 50% to cover more than 400 locals and more than 110,000 members in the U.S. and Canada.
“I have put forth my energy and every effort to enrich this organization and enlisted the help of what I believe to be a phenomenal staff of intelligent, sophisticated and progressive individuals who have stood ready to work hard and assist in accomplishing the goals I believe we had to achieve in order to survive the many challenges facing this International,” he said.

LAT In 90 Seconds

39341536.jpgTelling More About the Tell-All: Can’t get enough about Scott McClellan? Well, here’s more and more and even more. The LAT has, basically, what everyone else had about it… though we did appreciate the description of the former press secretary as “the 40-year-old, moon-faced, tennis-playing, Diet Coke-drinking McClellan.”

aftralogo29.jpgLAT on AFTRA: This next-day story goes for the analysis angle with this lede: “The new contract struck between the Hollywood studios and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists achieved across-the-board gains for actors, especially for journeyman performers who have seen their incomes squeezed in recent years. But it is not clear if those gains will be sufficient to mollify leaders of the larger Screen Actors Guild, which resumed negotiations with the studios on Wednesday.”

39348937.jpgGood Mommy Moment: Mary McNamara combats all that Hannah Montana nonsense by introducing her school-aged kids to a real rock concert, thanks to The Police. We might be alone in this, but we appreciate a concert review that includes kids and a bit of personal info about the writer. Very Peter Larsen.

LAT In 90 Seconds

gwbpic.jpgProtect the Journos: An LAT opinion piece says that while Georgie is still in the White House, “the Senate needs to follow the House in approving the Free Flow of Information Act by a veto-proof margin.”

38603037-07112810.jpgR. Kelly Trial To Start: After six years of delays, the R. Kelly pornography trial is set to begin in Chicago on Friday. If convicted, the crooner could face 15 years in prison.

38566169-07093947.jpgStudios Walk From Table: After three weeks of talks, negotiations between Hollywood studios and the Screen Actors Guild ended Tuesday, “fueling anxiety over the prospect of another strike.”

LAT In 90 Seconds

38178194-23123050.jpgCannes Lineup Announced: Surprises include the Angelina Jolie/Clint Eastwood film Changeling and Steven Soderbergh’s back-to-back Che Guevara films. They’re also screening Indiana Jones out of competition, so at least one movie there will be fun to watch.

38180137-23160056.jpgMost Surprising Factoid of the Day: Kal Penn, who plays Kumar in Harold and Kumar is “currently a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania, teaching courses in ‘Images of Asian Americans in the Media’ and “Contemporary American Teen Films.’” Put that in your spliff and smoke it.

38179026-23142317.jpgSAG Talks Extended: According to Richard Verrier: “The Screen Actors Guild and major Hollywood studios have agreed to extend their contract talks another week in a sign that the two sides are making some, albeit limited, headway in their negotiations toward a new three-year agreement.” A cliffhanger. Goody.

Do SAG Noms Have Sweeney Todd Singing The Blues?

34366195.jpgThe Screen Actors Guild award nominations spell trouble for anybody who isn’t Sean Penn. According to The Envelope:

Rarely do we see performances not even nominated by SAG ever win Oscars. In fact, only Marcia Gay Harden in Pollock (2000) managed to pull that trick in the SAG awards’ entire 13-year history, a statistic that does not bode well for the stars of Atonement and Sweeney Todd, both chock full of Globe and BFCA nominations but completely ignored by “The Actor” (the official name for the trophy SAG hands out).

LAT In 90 Seconds

32694568.jpgMore Sumner Madness: Getting sick of Hollywood’s least-lovable codger, David Geffen and Steven Spielberg will likely be splitting from Paramount Pictures, less than two years after selling DreamWorks SKG to the Viacom outfit.

32698392.jpgSAG Elections Results: Incumbent Alan Rosenberg narrowly won a second term as president of the Screen Actors Guild. 72-year-old actor Seymour Cassel won 44 percent of the vote, to Rosenberg’s 47 percent — with Cassel supporters saying the would serve the union better as it confronts contract negotiations with studios next year. Rosenberg countered that argument, by calling Cassel “a thug.” Seems it worked.

pjack.jpegAngry Hobbit One Step Closer To His Golden Ring: Lord of the Rings director/deity Peter Jackson had to be a happy halfling yesterday: New Line Cinema was hit with $125,000 in sanctions in its ongoing legal battle with the disgruntled director, who made the studio a mountain of cash — and will likely see a bit more of it coming his way.