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Posts Tagged ‘So What Do You Do?’

Writing Advice from Producer of The Tudors, History Channel’s Vikings

Just in time for the upcoming premier of Vikings on the History Channel, Michael Hirst, the show’s writer and producer, talks about his writing process in the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series.

“The key for me with historical characters is they’re interesting because they’re human beings,” he said. “A little bit of Hemingway goes a long way here, but journalists and writers should honestly look at their material and have a real interest, a real passion in what they want to write, and they should also have a lot of knowledge, as well. You don’t write police procedural stuff unless you really know that beat, but it’s ultimately not the procedure that makes the show work — it’s the people. The more real they are, the better.”

Read more in So What Do You Do, Michael Hirst, Creator of The Tudors and Vikings?

Writing Advice from Producer of The Tudors, History Channel’s Vikings

Just in time for the upcoming premier of Vikings on the History Channel, Michael Hirst, the show’s writer and producer, talks about his writing process in the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series.

“The key for me with historical characters is they’re interesting because they’re human beings,” he said. ”A little bit of Hemingway goes a long way here, but journalists and writers should honestly look at their material and have a real interest, a real passion in what they want to write, and they should also have a lot of knowledge, as well.”

“You don’t write police procedural stuff unless you really know that beat, but it’s ultimately not the procedure that makes the show work — it’s the people. The more real they are, the better.”

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So What Do You Do, Michael Hirst, Creator of The Tudors and Vikings?

O‘s Adam Glassman: ‘Even Oprah thought I was nuts in the beginning’

If only he had enough hours in a day. That’s the most challenging part of Adam Glassman‘s gig as creative director of O: The Oprah Magazine, a post where he’s constantly navigating the worlds of graphic design, fashion and media. In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series, Glassman recalls his groundbreaking decision to use real women over fashion models.

“I don’t want to say that we don’t ever use models because there are times that we do, but as we speak to these three generations of women, how can you do that?” he said. “You need something that is going to appeal to everyone. So I started using women of all ages, and not just all ages, but really all shapes. And I thought that was really key. Even Oprah thought I was nuts in the beginning. She was like, ‘You really want to do fashion on real people?’ And I said, ‘Yes, why not? You do it on the show. You show your people in makeovers; you have it in the audience. Let’s try it.’”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Adam Glassman, Creative Director at O Magazine?

Pitchfork Founder on the Loss of Music Magazines

Way back in 1995, Ryan Schreiber was a high school graduate working as a record store clerk. Finding little on the Internet about indie music, he decided to start his own Web page and launched Pitchfork. With no publishing experience, the site eventually became the online authority on indie music, and nowadays a review there can make or break a career.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series, Schreiber discusses what the success of sites like his means for print music magazines.

“I think if you’re going to be able to do a print publication that works in 2013, it has to really take advantage of that format, and the things that that format offers that are much more difficult to execute on the Web are having really expansive, beautiful layouts for your articles and features and making it feel like a desirable object.”

He continued, “It used to be that when you picked up a music magazine in, like, the 90s there was all this cheap, chintzy content thrown in there and goofy sidebars and just sort of filler, almost. And it’s really just not an option anymore. I feel like if people are willing to make an investment in a music magazine — or in a magazine of any sort, currently — they want something that feels substantial and feels significant. It’s not a joke. It’s a real thing.”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Ryan Schreiber, Founder and CEO of Pitchfork?

Pitchfork Founder to Bloggers: ‘Be willing to work for a long period of time for just the love of it’

Way back in 1995, Ryan Schreiber was a high school graduate working as a record store clerk. Finding little on the Internet about indie music, he decided to start his own Web page and launched Pitchfork. With no publishing experience, the site eventually became the online authority on indie music, and nowadays a review there can make or break a career.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series, Schreiber says that aspiring entrepreneurs should “be willing to put in the work for a long period of time for just the love of it.”

“Today, more so than any other time, it seems really difficult to make a living in the media, especially in the music media,” he explained. “It’s just so crowded, and at this point the publications that are really able to establish themselves are the ones that are the most passionate and the most relatable. I find that the publications I tend to connect with most are ones that are, in many cases, written by a single voice, somebody who has a really interesting viewpoint or perspective.”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Ryan Schreiber, Founder and CEO of Pitchfork?

Elvis Mitchell: ‘Showbiz journalism is even more shallow than I thought’

Since departing The New York Times in 2005, Elvis Mitchell has continued to host “The Treatment,” his popular weekly syndicated public radio show. But, after the media missed the biggest scoop in his Interview piece with Joaquin Phoenix, Mitchell called the field of entertainment news “shallow” and said his fellowjournos still have much work to do.

“Showbiz journalism is even more shallow than I thought it would be,” ”There is a pretty lengthy part of the conversation that is about race, which I thought was as worthy if not more so as to what he was saying about awards season,” said Mitchell in the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do series.

“That he walked away from a movie because he wasn’t happy with the way it was being handled, and he thought there was this inertia that plays on this really antiquated attitude towards people of color in the movies. And so far as I can see, almost nobody picked that up. I thought that would have been the thing that had people really jumping.”

Read more in So What Do You Do, Elvis Mitchell, Film Critic and Host of KCRW’s “The Treatment”?

Producer Nina Parker Reflects on Her Time at TMZ

If you happened to flip past TMZ sometime last fall, you probably noticed a familiar face was missing.

Nina Parker, who started off at the entertainment website as a runner in 2007 before she was promoted to producer, left last September for a position with The Insider as an on-air correspondent.

“Before I got there [TMZ], I had never worked that hard in my life,” Parker told Mediabistro. “I was literally at times sleeping in my car and then just going to work.”

For Parker, TMZ was the opportunity she needed to break into the business. After studying broadcast and electronic communication arts at San Francisco State University, the Sacramento native was working a regular 9-5 job back home.

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Why Richard Lawson Left Gawker For Atlantic Wire

It’s been almost eight months since entertainment writer and TV recapper extraordinaire Richard Lawson jumped into The Atlantic Wire. After racking up 2.4 million monthly views as Gawker’s most popular writer, you’d think Lawson would want to stay put.

But in Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview, the scribe said he left Nick Denton‘s empire simply because it was time to “grow up.”

“After a while, the Gawker snark — for lack of a less heavy word — can get a bit tiring. I think it’s great and I think it has its place, but I felt like I wanted to be a little more mature, I guess,” he said. ”I love all of the writing at Gawker still, but just for myself, I’m getting a chance to do more serious movie reviews and stuff I think wouldn’t have necessarily played out well on Gawker.”

Dan Savage on Alternative Weeklies, Savage U

Nationally syndicated sex columnist Dan Savage is known for discussing all things X-rated, but I recently had the chance to interview him for “So What Do You Do?” to discuss the future of alternative weeklies, how he branched out into other media outlets and his new MTV show, Savage U.

On if alternative weeklies will fare any better in the digital era:

DS: I don’t! The print media is in trouble everywhere and is having to transition and transition fast to the new economic models.

If his other media ventures were deliberate moves or did other outlets approach him:

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THR‘s Janice Min Talks Best Coast For Media

It’s been a crazy year for Janice Min. Since the powerhouse editor jetted off to the West Coast to take over The Hollywood Reporter, the 81-year-old publication has pulled in more than 55 billion media impressions and received more Web traffic than its three biggest competitors combined.

At first glance, it seems Min is settling in nicely with her big move to Los Angeles. But the publishing vet says there are some big differences of the media scene in both coasts that made the transition rough.

“It’s weird,” the editorial director told us. “New York is so media-centric. People find people in the media fascinating.” But L.A., said Min, isn’t down for fawning over big-name editors when there are Hollywood heavyweights stealing the limelight. “There’s no media hangout in L.A.”

Read more in So What Do You Do, Janice Min, Editorial Director of The Hollywood Reporter?

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