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Posts Tagged ‘social media’

Morning Media Newsfeed: NYT‘s Embargo Fiasco | AOL EIC Out | SpaghettiOs’ Tweet

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NYT Scoops Itself (Politico / Dylan Byers on Media)
The New York Times had a “groundbreaking” story, and the Las Vegas Sun published it first. Just before 8 p.m. on Sunday, New York Times political editor (and soon-to-be Washington bureau chief) Carolyn Ryan announced via Twitter that her paper had “a very unusual, groundbreaking” story due for publication later that evening. “I can’t say too much but it’ll make u rethink- well, I should stop. Stay tuned,” she wrote. Ryan’s tease gave way to a torrent of inquiries and speculation from fellow journalists — the hashtag #nytguesses became a popular meme. Gawker As time paused for Ryan, the Las Vegas Sun, a subscriber to the New York Times wire, found the story slug and eventually published the full piece on the Sun website around 8 p.m. NY Mag / Daily Intelligencer BuzzFeed’s Andrew Kaczynski noticed that the Times News Service’s raw budget appeared on the website of the Las Vegas Sun, and that one story sure seemed to fit the bill, as described by Ryan. The Sun appears to have violated its contract with Times News Service. Toward the bottom of the budget, a paragraph stipulates that sharing the document constitutes a violation of the contract terms. Just after midnight the Sun pulled the story and apologized, appropriately, via Twitter. Facebook / Las Vegas Sun “Due to a technical problem, the Las Vegas Sun prematurely published a New York Times News Service story Sunday on the Sun’s website. The problem occurred when a new wire feed that the Sun implemented last week failed to recognize that the story was embargoed for publication at a later time. The Sun has pulled the story from its site and apologizes for this inadvertent error.”

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Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

Victor Cruz: I Wouldn’t Be Opposed to a Twitter Editor

Back from two weeks’ vacation, Dan Patrick and the Danettes relaunched things in the Man Cave this morning with a timely guest: New York Giants wide receiver Victor Cruz. The athlete explained why he deleted his controversial Twitter reaction to the George Zimmerman verdict, replacing the message with an apology and several other more heartfelt observations:

“In the moment, when it happened – I’m not going to lie, I was a little angry. As a father, you think about if that was your son, if that was your kid… I put out the tweet as a reaction to what I was seeing on Twitter, to what my friends and family were writing on Twitter.”

“And I put the tweet out there and once I put it out, I thought, ‘Man, it’s not the right thing to say.’ There’s kids that follow me and I don’t want them to think that I’m trying to incite violence on anyone. Those aren’t my intentions, I’m not that type of guy. Where I come from, I heard violence outside my window each and every day, and I don’t want to be someone to promote that even more so.”

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7 Tips for Responding to Negative Social Media Feedback

Social media can be a boon and a bane to companies and consumers alike. It’s undoubtedly true that brands and consumers can have a constructive dialogue on Twitter and Facebook. Case in point: A WSJ subscriber misses an issue and tweets his displeasure to head honcho Rupert Murdoch himself. Not only did he get a reply, but some quality customer service as well!

Unfortunately, trolls abound in the online world and can drown out those offering constructive criticism. How can you tell the haters from those that are worth responding to? And how can you manage your time when it comes to responding to criticism? In the latest Mediabistro feature, social media experts weigh in on how to handle negative feedback in a way that’s best for you and your audience.

One big piece of advice: don’t just delete.

“How you handle a negative comment says much more about you than the comment itself,” said Shama Kabani, CEO of The Marketing Zen Group. “Removing a comment can lead to others accusing you of censorship and, at worst, can lead to a PR disaster.”

For more, read 7 Tips for Responding to Negative Social Media Feedback. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

5 Digital Skills Every Journalist Should Have

multimedia skills“[Journalists] are increasingly being required to take away from time doing actual reporting to do a million other things,” said Menachem Wecker, education reporter for U.S. News & World Report. Which is why, if you want to succeed in the world of new media, having certain digital skills is a requirement. In the latest Mediabistro feature, seasoned journos tell which skills are the most important for journos to have, and give tips on how to boost your social media presence and resume. Below, an excerpt:

1. Social Media Management

Once you’ve written the perfect post, monitor how well it does through platforms like Chartbeat and Google Analytics. Find out how many shares you’re getting through Facebook posts or whether Twitter fans are actually reading your stories or just retweeting them. Then, take it a step further and promote your stories during the times of day when your audience is the largest. Tweetdeck will let you “future post” updates, as will other apps like Twuffer or twitmessenger. Now that social media is no longer just a fad, your goal should be to familiarize yourself with any and all platforms that will bolster the efficacy of your accounts.

For the full list, read 5 Digital Skills Every Journalist Should Have. [subscription required]

New York Times’ Social Media Policy: Use Common Sense, Idiot

While many big media companies have a slew of social media guidelines for its staffers, The New York Times doesn’t. According to Phil Corbett, the Times’ associate managing editor for standards, that’s because they just feel like it isn’t needed.

Corbett told Poynter that strapping staffers down with a lot of rules is counterproductive. He then added some obvious points:

They need to realize that social media is basically a public activity, it’s not a private activity, and that people will know that they work for the Times, that they are Times journalists, and will identify them with the Times. And so they should just keep that in mind and be careful not to do anything on social media that would undercut their credibility.

In other words, use common sense and don’t be an idiot. Seems pretty straightforward to us.

Meet Devon Franklin, Oprah’s New BFF

DevonFranklinOprahOWN (1)new.jpgDeVon Franklin, VP of production for Columbia/Sony Pictures, had a very big weekend. On Saturday, he tied the knot with Jumping the Broom actress Meagan Good,  and Sunday his hour-long interview with Oprah Winfrey aired on the OWN network’s Super Soul Sunday program.

But, before he was making all of these headlines, the preacher and author of Produced By Faith sat down with Mediabistro just over a year ago, as part of our Media Beat series. In the three-part interview, he discussed his impressive rise from intern to VP in the film industry, as well as how his faith has positively impacted his career and personal life. “My whole big idea for my life is to inspire and encourage, and God has called me to use film as part of a way to do that,” he said.

Watch the first part of our interview below and check out Parts 2 and 3 after the jump.

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Social Media Marketing Boot Camp Starts Tomorrow

If you want to build your brand or generate revenue for your business, make sure you check out Mediabistro’s Social Media Marketing Boot Camp online conference and workshop, starting tomorrow, Thursday, June 7. You’ll learn how to launch a social media marketing campaign and measure its results.

Over eight weeks, you’ll hear from leading social media innovators and put a complete social media marketing strategy into place across Facebook, Twitter, and other popular social media platforms. Your social media strategy will include content management, brand building, and data analysis.

You’ll learn in an innovative online format that participants love: live keynote speeches via video, practical how-to sessions, small group workshops with peers, and one-on-one feedback from an advisor.

Speakers include:

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6 Huge Mistakes Journalists Make in Social Media

No. 3? You don’t have a plan.

Whether you’re looking to increase followers, drive clicks back to your website, or just get people buzzing about your stories, you need to have a plan for any social media platform you join. A good strategy will help you avoid wasting resources or, worse, breaking your company’s social media policy.

Chris O’Brien, business and technology columnist at the San Jose Mercury News, said his paper’s policy “is like a one-page, basic ‘use your head’ philosophy.” Don’t appear to be biased if you are a beat reporter. “Keep in mind that you are representing the organization out there,” he explained.

Are you using social media wisely? Find out in The Biggest Mistakes Journalists Make in Social Media.

ag_logo_medium.gif This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Rewrite That Headline To Make Your Story Go Viral

When readers are skimming through a site on their browsers or Twitter feeds, the headline is the only thing that tells them whether a piece is worth their time. So, when tackling headlines for the Web, remember that clarity trumps cleverness (unless you’re writing for the front page of The New York Post).

“Headline writing for the Web isn’t headline writing for magazines — this is the land of the literal,” said Sara Wilson, a senior editor for The Huffington Post.

But that doesn’t mean a headline can’t also be engaging. “You want a strong ‘clicky’ headline that entices readers: a burning question, a big secret, a thing-you-need-to-click-on-this-headline-to-find-out,” she said. “But it should accurately reflect the ideas in the piece, or the readers will be annoyed.”

For eight more tactics on getting your article the buzz it deserves, read 9 Ways to Get More Comments, Tweets and Likes for Your Story.

Toure Lights Up the Twittersphere with a Debate on… Tipping?

If you ever needed proof that a non-Kardashian can rule Twitter, look no further than Toure. Seriously. Go ahead — look at his timeline.

Whether it’s a line-by-line breakdown of the song “Otis,” his take on the final season of Entourage, or the truth behind that Michael Vick article, the noted journalist and cultural critic has amassed over 36,000 followers by posting more than just links.

“I seem to look at it as if I’m on a panel, and there’s thousands of people there. And it’s a Q&A-type situation, so I make a statement that would relate to many people,” the author of Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness explained in our Media Beat interview. “I do want it to be conversational in that you can have an opinion back or an answer back to me; I can respond back to that. And there is an impulse to be ADD-ish on Twitter, to say one thing and to move on. And I wanna have a conversation. I wanna spend 10 or 15 minutes or 10 or 20 tweets talking about one thing and drilling down on one idea. Look, I hate small talk.”

So, what’s the one topic that got the Twittersphere in a tizzy? Tipping. Watch the full video to find out why.

You can also view this video on YouTube.

Part 2: Toure Tackles Watermelon, Fried Chicken and Post-Blackness in New Book

Part 3: Toure on Pitching, Getting Assignments, and That R. Kelly Interview

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