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Posts Tagged ‘Stephen Adler’

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: The Year’s Biggest Moves In Media

door.jpgThis year — full of flux and uncertainty about where the media is heading — has resulted in a vast number of job changes and departures across all matter of media companies and publications. In almost every field of journalism, big names have either been fired, promoted, retired, or simply moved on to more lucrative positions. Here, we take a look back at the biggest industry shakeups of 2009.

The Biggest Move in Magazines: Stephen Adler leaving BusinessWeek.
When editor Stephen Adler announced his departure from BusinessWeek this October following the magazine’s sale to Bloomberg LP, he wasn’t just making a statement, he was starting a trend. Soon he was followed by some of his former colleagues, like John Byrne and BusinessWeek‘s president Keith Fox, who decided to stay with magazine’s original parent, McGraw-Hill. (Not to mention all of those who involuntarily left the pub not long after.) It takes a lot of chutzpah to up and quit your editor gig in the middle of this turbulent media landscape, it takes even more to get your coworkers to come with you. Fortunately for Adler, he’s already landed another gig at Thomson Reuters.

Runners Up: Time.com managing editor Josh Tyrangiel comes on board as editor at Businessweek; Marie Claire‘s publisher Susan Plagemann joins Vogue; Nancy Berger Cardone of shuttered Gourmet takes Plagemann’s spot at Marie Claire; Janice Min leaves Us Weekly; Mariette DiChristina becomes Scientific American‘s first female editor-in-chief.

More after the jump

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Report: Thomson Reuters To Cut 240 From Legal Division

westlaw.jpgOne day after former BusinessWeek editor Stephen Adler was named editorial director of Thomson Reuters‘ Professional division, Dow Jones reports that the media company will lay off 240 employees from one of that division’s sub-sectors.

According to Dow Jones, the cuts will come from Thomson Reuters’ legal division, which includes the Westlaw database and other information and services for legal professionals. The division employs 13,000 people, meaning layoffs of this size will decrease the staff by less than two percent.

Update: A Thomson Reuters spokesman has confirmed to FishbowlNY that the company’s legal division today told 240 people “across a number of its North American businesses and locations that their positions have been eliminated.” Those let go were “primarily in software and content operations.” Severance packages and “outplacement support” is being offered to all those affected, the rep added.

Thomson Reuters To Cut 240 Positions In Legal Business –Dow Jones Newswires

Previously: Former BusinessWeek Editor Adler Finds A New Home At Reuters

Former BusinessWeek Editor Adler Finds A New Home At Reuters

westlaw.jpgThompson Reuters announced today that departed BusinessWeek editor Stephen Adler is joining the media company in the newly created position of senior vice president and editorial director of its Professional division.

The Professional division of Thompson Reuters, which includes the company’s Westlaw legal database as well as research and info for tax, healthcare and science professionals, is separate from its newswire division. However, the company was quick to add that Adler would “play a central role in helping to leverage editorial content across the organization,” and will serve as a member of Reuters News editor-in-chief David Schlesinger‘s “leadership team.”

Adler announced he would be stepping down as editor-in-chief of BusinessWeek shortly after Bloomberg LP acquired the business mag. Adler joined BusinessWeek in 2004 from The Wall Street Journal. He also formerly worked as an editor at The American Lawyer magazine and holds a JD from Harvard Law School, no doubt giving him plenty of experience with Westlaw.

Full release after the jump

Previously: BusinessWeek Editor Adler Heads For The Door

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John Byrne BusinessWeek Departure Rumors Turn True

johnbyrne .jpgWhen false reports of the deaths of Lady Gaga or Jeff Goldblum get blasted all over Twitter, it becomes a trend piece in The New York Times. “The Internet Who Cried Wolf” serves as a gentle reminder that not everything you read online is true.

The media equivalent of course, would be Anna Wintour‘s departure from Vogue. There have been so many rumors, sworn testimonies and first-hand accounts of the editrix leaving Condé Nast that sometimes it seems like she’s hanging on there just to spite the morning’s headlines.

But recently, the magazine departure watchdogs have had a new person of interest: BusinessWeek.com‘s editor-in-chief John Byrne. Except this time, the gossipers were right. Turns out, Byrne is leaving the Bloomberg LP-owned business magazine to launch a digital media company in San Francisco.

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Bloomberg Looks To Cut BusinessWeek Staffers

businessweek cover new.jpgIt’s been a busy week for the new Bloomberg LP-owned BusinessWeek. First, there was the appointment of a new editor, Josh Tyrangiel, to succeed Stephen Adler. And now, the layoffs are upon us.

According to reports, Bloomberg is looking to cut about 100 positions from BusinessWeek, or about 25 percent of the magazine’s total staff. Some of those layoffs have already reportedly started, with more to come today.

The Wall Street Journal reports that, over the last few weeks, Bloomberg has been asking BusinessWeek editorial staff members to submit “resumes, news clips and 250-word statements about their personal qualifications,” to their new bosses. If that info helps to determine who stays and who goes, it sounds like these staffers had to basically reapply in order to keep their jobs.

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Time Editor Tyrangiel To Lead Bloomberg’s BusinessWeek

tyrangiel.jpgThis morning, Bloomberg LP named Time magazine’s deputy managing editor Josh Tyrangiel as the next editor of the recently acquired BusinessWeek.

Tyrangiel, who was also the managing editor of Time.com, was instrumental in the recent relaunch of the Web site. He will be replacing Stephen Adler who announced that he was stepping down from his post last month after Bloomberg acquired the weekly pub in early October. Tyrangiel will be reporting to Norman Pearlstine, Bloomberg’s chief content officer, who in turn will report to Matthew Winkler, editor-in-chief of Bloomberg.

Pearlstine, a former editor-in-chief of Time Inc., first met Tyrangiel while working at the magazine publisher. “I saw Josh in a number of leadership positions as he took on increasing responsibilities at Time…” Pearlstine said. “Josh is recognized within Time Inc. and its parent, Time Warner Inc., as an ‘editor’s editor’ and a natural leader. His understanding of the ways in which print and online publications can work together will serve Bloomberg well as we expand our consumer media offerings.”

Before joining Time, Tyrangiel worked at Vibe and Rolling Stone and produced news for MTV.

Full release after the jump

Long form journalism on the Web is “not working,” TIME.com Managing Editor –Beet.TV

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Bloomberg Starts To Put Together BusinessWeek Staff

businessweek_3.pngToday’s New York Times “Media Decoder” blog post about the restructuring of BusinessWeek post-Bloomberg LP‘s acquisition has a funny ring to it. We already know that editor Stephen Adler is stepping down, as well as president Keith Fox. So who will be manning the new magazine?

Apparently, the people who decided to stick around. But, unless you’re reading carefully, you’d never know it. The Times mentions Bloomberg “has selected a few staff members to make the leap to Bloomberg BusinessWeek,” but you can’t tell right away if those staffers are from the magazine or Bloomberg. Except if you are intimately familiar with the BusinessWeek masthead.

The “new” magazine editors — Ellen Pollock, John Byrne, and Ciro Scotti — are actually just continuing in their former positions. (Mainly, it seems like the story is just there to address rumors of Pollock and Byrne’s departures.) Jessica Sibley, who came in to help the ailing magazine in the role of senior vice president and worldwide publisher back in February of 2008 will be the new magazine’s publisher as Fox stays behind at McGraw-Hill. The Times post is titled “Bloomberg Builds a Staff For BusinessWeek” but it should really be “Bloomberg Announces Who’s Decided Not To Leave.”

Someone who is leaving — Roger Neal, the current general manager of BusinessWeek.com. His staff will now report to Bloomberg’s Kevin Krim.

Also of note: All BusinessWeek employees will be moving to Bloomberg headquarters on December 4, unless they already work in New York, in which case they can stay at their former offices until the Bloomberg building has room for them.

Memo to BusinessWeek staffers after the jump.

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Last Week at BusinessWeek

businessweek_cover.jpgWe would have awarded the media fatigue prize last week to Condé Nast and all the speculation of what they’d cut next but, let’s face it, every week is a Condé Nast week.

Last week, the true speculation has been about Bloomberg LP‘s acquisition of BusinessWeek from McGraw-Hill: Who’s staying, who’s going, and who should step up to the plate and run the publication.

Read on for a recap of BusinessWeek news.

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BusinessWeek Editor Adler Heads For The Door

bw_cover.jpgAfter much speculation about how Bloomberg LP’s acquisition of BusinessWeek would affect the magazine’s staff, it looks like editor-in-chief Stephen Adler will be the first casualty of the deal.

Yesterday afternoon, Adler sent a memo to the pub’s staff announcing his plans to depart after the sale to Bloomberg is completed later this year.

“It was hugely important to me to help find the right home for BusinessWeek and to work closely with our business-side colleagues to ensure that staffers would be provided appropriate benefits under any circumstance,” Adler said in his memo. “Now that these goals have been accomplished, I’m considering other opportunities, and I believe it makes sense for a new owner to move forward with a new editor.”

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Bloomberg “Most Aggressive” Bidder For BusinessWeek

businessweek cover.jpgAlthough BusinessWeek‘s media columnist Jon Fine has already departed for his six-month sabbatical, his publication is still closely tracking its own sale.

Bids for the business magazine were due yesterday to BusinessWeek‘s owner McGraw-Hill, and at least four parties have submitted revised bids, according to Tom Lowry, who has taken over Fine’s “On Media” column:

“Among those submitting revised bids were financial data giant Bloomberg LP, private equity firm Open Gate Capital, and investment firm ZelnickMedia LLC. At least one other bidder, which BusinessWeek was not able to identify, also submitted a bid.”

Although details of the bids are unknown, Lowry said Bloomberg has been “the most aggressive in its pursuit of BusinessWeek.” According to Lowry, Bloomberg’s chief content officer Norm Pearlstine met with various members of the BusinessWeek editorial team last week, including editor-in-chief Stephen Adler, executive editors Ellen Pollock and John Byrne and Ciro Scotti, BusinessWeek‘s managing editor. These meetings discussed topics like the possibility of integrating content from Bloomberg into the magazine and adding more editorial pages to the book, which “suggests Bloomberg might be looking at tinkering with BusinessWeek‘s traditional 60-40 mix of editorial pages to ad pages,” Lowry said.

Right now, it’s all speculation. The sales process is just at the beginning, but we’re bound to learn more as it progresses. But a successful media company like Bloomberg taking over the reins of a struggling pub like BusinessWeek certainly seems promising, even if the editorial mix of the mag may change in the future. If BusinessWeek survives in any form, and jobs are saved, it’s better than the fate suffered by other magazines, like Portfolio.

BusinessWeek Accepts Revised Bids From Potential BuyersBusinessWeek

Earlier: Getting The Skinny On The BusinessWeek Deal As Bid Deadline Looms

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