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Posts Tagged ‘Steve Coll’

CJR Finds Its New EIC

LizSpaydTwitterProfilePicJoe Pompeo has the scoop on an important succession.

Liz Spayd (pictured), formerly at The Washington Post, is replacing Cyndi Stivers as editor-in-chief of the Columbia Journalism Review. Stivers left in the spring to become EIC of AOL.com. From Pompeo’s item:

“We’re very excited about Liz’s arrival and have high hopes that she will lead CJR into a new era of influence and digital adaptation,” Columbia Journalism School Dean Steve Coll, himself a Post veteran, wrote in a Thursday morning internal announcement obtained by Capital New York.

According to Pompeo’s previous reporting, Spayd beat out former Roling Stone executive editor Eric Bates. Read the rest of his item here.

[Photo courtesy: @spaydl]

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Steve Coll Named Dean of Columbia Graduate School of Journalism

Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and former Washington Post managing editor Steve Coll has been named dean of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. He will succeed Nicholas Lemann, who has announced he was stepping down as dean last October. Lemann had been the school’s dean since 2003.

Coll was most recently the president of The New American Foundation and worked at WaPo from 1985 to 2004. He is also the author of seven books, a frequent contributor to The New Yorker.

“Steve Coll is one of the most experienced and respected journalists of his generation,” said Columbia’s president, Lee Bollinger, in a statement. “Sweeping changes in digital technology and the global marketplace have created unprecedented challenges and opportunities for the news media that demand our constant reflection on the mission and substance of a modern journalism education. Our Journalism School is thriving today because of its innovative response to these developments, and Steve’s breadth of experience as a reporter, editor, author and executive make him ideally suited to lead the School in the years ahead.”

Pulitzer Board Adds Three

Columbia University has added three new members to its Pulitzer Prize Board. Joining the group are Steve Coll, Quiara Alegría Hudes and Aminda Marques Gonzalez.

Coll, a two-time Pulitzer winner, has spend 20 years at The Washington Post, eventually serving as managing editor. He has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 2005 and has written seven books.

Hudes, the winner of the 2012  Pulitzer for drama, has had her work celebrated for years. She also serves on the Dramatists Guild Council and as a Board Member for the Philadelphia Young Playwrights.

Gonzalez was named executive editor of The Miami Herald in 2010. She is the first Hispanic to hold that role. During her time at the paper the Herald has been nominated for several Pulitzers.

The New Yorker Chooses 9/11 for First e-Book

We’re not quite sure how much of an audience there is for e-books, but The New Yorker is certainly grabbing some attention with its first venture into the territory. The Cutline reports that the magazine’s first e-book — titled After 9/11 — will center on 9/11, and features writing that will make it attractive to readers:

[The book] includes vignettes from the magazine’s trademark ‘Talk of the Town’ section by Hendrik Hertzberg, John Updike, Jonathan Franzen, Susan Sontag, Calvin Trillin and George Packer; deeply reported features by Adam Gopnik, Seymour Hersh, Jane Mayer, Jon Lee Anderson and Steve Coll; criticism by Malcolm Gladwell; and fiction by Don DeLillo. It also includes Nicholas Schmidles recent account of the raid that killed Osama bin Laden.

The New Yorker’s Deputy Editor, Pam McCarthy, said that if the book is successful, the magazine will look to do more.

After 9/11 is available for $7.99 on the Kindle or Nook.

Huffington Says The Internet Isn’t Killing Newspapers At Senate Hearings

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Wednesday, the US Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation held a hearing on “The Future of Journalism” with testimony from experts on new media and the newspaper industry. Committee Chairman Sen. John Kerry called for the hearing to examine what, if anything, the government can do to save the newspaper industry from seemingly unstoppable decline.

Many of the day’s speakers had ideas for improving the state of print journalism. They also seemed ready to take on news aggregators like Google and the Huffington Post.

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The Sarah Palin Interview Day Four, Or, TVNewser Fact Checks The New Yorker

gibson_9-15(2).jpgTVNewser has taken a closer look at Steve Coll‘s column today in the New Yorker and finds it “short of facts and long on attacks.”

The New Yorker‘s Steve Coll spends a column today blasting ABC News over a variety of issues relating to Charlie Gibson‘s interview with Gov. Sarah Palin. But the overriding theme — that ABC attempted to turn the interview into an entertainment event — appears factually incorrect.
Apparently the decision to air the interview in three parts wasn’t just a ratings ploy, it was ABC’s way of turning “the material as fast as we can. There’s a real overriding public interest in hearing from Gov. Palin.” Uh huh. Also, there was no collaboration between ABC and the McCain camp. Also, ABC is not happy with Coll’s column. Of course, tomorrow this could all just be conversation for the soup kitchen line-up. Stay tuned!

Is Obama Playing Media Favorites?

url.jpgA line slipped in near the end of Mike Allen‘s Politico article about the media coverage of Barack Obama‘s overseas trip, is making some waves. Per Allen: “Among those for whom there was no room was Ryan Lizza, Washington correspondent of The New Yorker. The campaign, which was furious about the magazine’s satirical cover this week, cited space constraints in turning him away.” (Hmm, sort of like the time John McCain neglected to invite the NYT to his health records viewing party.) Over at Eat the Press Rachel Sklar says the decision “sends a clear — and worrisome — signal from the Obama campaign: If we don’t like it, man, will you know it.” A decision, she points out, which merely reinforces a quote made in Lizza’s (amazingly researched, though not terribly flattering) article : “[Obama] earned a reputation that “‘you’re not going to punk me, you’re not going to roll me over, you’re not going to jam me.’”

It should be noted The New Yorker was not the only one cut out of the “Trip of the Century”; 200 people applied and only 40 were allocated spots. That said, The New Yorker is hardly your average magazine. As Gawker’s Ryan Tate points out,

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