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Posts Tagged ‘Susan Plagemann’

Vogue.com and Style.com Share Floor at One WTC

Staffers for Vogue.com and Style.com are getting cozy. WWD reports that the teams will share the 29th floor at Condé Nast’s new headquarters, One World Trade Center. We know. This is a bit much. It’s a story only a media reporter could love. Okay, maybe “love” is too strong. This is a story a media reporter could give a hearty handshake.

Initially, the plan was for Vogue’s staff — both digital and print — to occupy the 25th floor. This would’ve been a change for Vogue, which had kept digital and print staff separate at 4 Times Square. But in a dramatic change of events, Vogue.com and Style.com staffers recently learned they would both be taking over the 29th floor.

The change makes sense. In November we learned that Style.com’s brass would be reporting to Vogue’s brass. Style.com’s publisher Matt Rice now reports to Vogue’s publisher Susan Plagemann, and Style.com’s editor Dirk Standen now reports to Vogue’s editor Anna Wintour. Might as well combine the two websites’ teams too.

[Image: Instagram/Condé Nast]

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Style.com Changes Reporting Structure

Style.com is getting swept under the Vogue rug. Well, maybe that’s a bit dramatic. According to WWD, the site’s publisher Matt Rice and will now report to Vogue’s publisher Susan Plagemann. Likewise, Style.com’s editor — Dirk Standen — will now report to Vogue’s editor, Anna Wintour.

The move seems to indicate that Condé Nast execs aren’t too pleased with Style.com. At the very least, they want to give the site a kick in the pants via changes in content and strategy.

As WWD reports, a Style.com/Vogue combo is actually quite retro:

Fourteen years ago, the site was established as the online home of Vogue and W magazines. But Wintour lobbied for years for her own site for Vogue, and so, in 2010, Style.com was pushed out of Condé Nast to Fairchild Fashion Media. It was shuffled back to Condé this summer, when Fairchild was sold to Penske Media Corp.

Outlander Author Diana Gabaldon on Writing Best Sellers and Playing Nice With Hollywood

LunchAtMichaelsJudging by the decibel level at Michael’s today the media mavens and swells had plenty to talk about between bites of their Korean tacos (delish!) and Cobb salads. There’s always a flurry of activity on the last Wednesday in July before most of the last remaining power lunchers depart for their much-needed vacations in August. You can only be fabulous (or pretend to be) for so long before you have to regroup and refuel.

For us, July isn’t going out with a whisper but rather with a bang as I had one of the most fascinating Michael’s lunches in eons with best-selling author Diana Gabaldon, whose wildly popular Outlander novels rocket right to the top spot on The New York Times best-seller list as soon as they’re published. She has sold a head-spinning 25 million books that have been translated into 24 languages. The mind reels. Her most recent, Written in My Own Heart’s Blood (how’s that for a title?) came out in June, the same week Hillary Clinton‘s book did. I guess you know whose publisher had a better week. I was “the last stop” on Diana’s magical mystical media tour, which has included an SRO appearance at Comic-Con, a sell-out conversation at the 92nd Street Y and, just this morning, an appearance on CBS This Morning with the two lead actors of the new original series based on the books that premieres August 9 on Starz.

Diana Gabaldon and Diane Clehane.

Diana Gabaldon and Diane Clehane

It’s always a bit of a crapshoot sitting down with someone I’ve never met to make conversation over lunch with the expressed purpose of learning as much as I can about my companion in about an hour while fielding the numerous “newsflashes” that come courtesy of the diners around the room. I was grateful I got a good night’s sleep last night because simply put, Diana is a force of nature. I could barely keep up as she recounted the story of how she decided “to write a book just to learn what it took to do it; I did it for practice” and how her pragmatic approach to novel writing (which hasn’t changed much, by the way) has catapulted her to international stardom.

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Vogue Posts Ad Page Gain for Vital September Issue

For fashion magazines, the September issue is extremely important. People need to know what to buy for the upcoming holiday season because they all need new things that will become old within months, and advertisers are very eager to tell them.

According to Adweek, Vogue’s September issue will have plenty to offer. The magazine closed with 584 ad pages, an increase of 50 pages over last year’s issue. Susan Plagemann, Vogue’s Publisher, attributed the gain to fashion and beauty advertising increases and healthy newsstand sales. “The brand’s relevance is at an all-time high,” she said.

Condé Nast Honors Top Executives

Last evening at Florida’s Ocean Reef Club Condé Nast CEO Charles Townsend hosted an award ceremony to honor the company’s outstanding performers.  Townsend handed out a lot of hardware Condé’s magazine’s had reason to celebrate.

Wired’s Howard Mittman was named Publisher of the Year and the magazine’s entire business staff was lauded for 24 percent ad page growth.

Vogue publisher Susan Plagemann and her sales team won the Peak Performance Award for a 16 percent rise in ad pages.

Rick Levine, Condé Nast’s SVP of editorial operations, took home the Corporate Executive of the Year Award for his work in the digital arena.

Vanity Fair editor-in-chief Graydon Carter and publisher Edward Menicheschi were recognized for spearheading the company’s largest profit gain by any magazine last year

Peggy Siegal, Pamela Fiori & the Winner of Lunch with Laurel

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— DIANE CLEHANE

While the regulars in the dining room at Michael’s chatted about their plans for the upcoming holiday weekend, it seemed only fitting that my lunch today was with Laurie Haspel Aronson, president of Haspel, the quintessential American company responsible for the creation of the classic seersucker suit. Laurie tells me it was the brainchild of her great grandfather, Joseph Haspel, who wanted to turn the fabric once favored by laborers for its cool comfort into a natty summertime staple of bankers and businessman everywhere.

Haspel, which was founded back in 1909, has dressed some pretty iconic fellows including Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch in To Kill A Mockingbird. Jimmy Smits, who wore Haspel during his stint on The West Wing, will be sporting seersucker this weekend when he hosts PBS’ July 4th special and on his upcoming series Outlaw that premieres this fall.

Laurie explains how the venerable label remains a current fashion favorite (Russell Brand is a fan) but hasn’t alienated its old school clientele this way: “The great thing about it is it can be worn by everyone and looks good on everybody. It takes on the personality of the wearer.” Indeed.

Here’s the rundown on today’s crowd:

1. Former Chanel president Arie Kopelman and his wife Coco with Pamela Fiori (in Chanel) and a distinguished looking gent we didn’t recognize.

2. A very blonde Peggy Siegal and a handsome young fellow.

3. Scribe Phoebe Eaton, looking very glam

4. Abernathy & MacGregor’s Jim Abernathy

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Slowly But Surely, Ad Pages Start to Climb For Women’s Mags

108861_whitney-houst-on-the-cover-of-instyle-january-2010.jpgFinally some good news: after two years of plummeting ad sales and scarce revenue for magazines, signs are pointing to money flowing back into print. Time Inc.one of the publishers hit hardest during the great magazine recession of the last few years — has seen its InStyle title jump 33.5 percent in ad pages for their March issue when compared to the same issue in 2009.

Meanwhile, Hearst‘s Marie Claire jumped 22.8 percent in their first quarter, and as we mentioned last week, Rodale‘s Prevention saw a 31 percent increase in ad pages for their March edition. Call it new blood — InStyle‘s recent hire of publisher Connie Anne Phillips last year, and Susan Plagemann from Marie Claire who was credited for the first quarter success (though she has now jumped to Vogue, which is also seeing ad increases) — or call it the recovery we’ve all been waiting for, but hopefully the trend of advertisers returning to magazines will continue. At least until we get this whole “selling ads on the Internet” thing figured out.

Read More: Women’s Beauty/Fashion ‘Spring Preview’: InStyle is Up Strongly –minOnline

Previously: Prevention Sees Ad Pages, Revenue Climb In March, Surveying The Damage Of Yesterday’s Time Inc. Cuts

Marie Claire Publisher Proves Dreams Do Come True

prar01_cardone212-1.jpgWhen Gourmet folded nearly four months ago, its staff, including publisher Nancy Berger Cardone, found themselves adrift among a sea of unemployed media workers.

Not long after, Cardone sat down for lunch with Hearst Magazine’s chief marketing officer, Michael Clinton. Although he had no job to offer her, Clinton asked Cardone which Hearst title she would work for if she had her pick. Her answer: Marie Claire.

“Maybe it was wishful thinking,” Cardone said last night, as Clinton and Hearst president Cathie Black celebrated Cardone’s appointment as the latest publisher of the fashion magazine in a small gathering on the 44th floor of the Hearst building. As luck would have it, not long after her lunch date with Clinton, Marie Claire‘s publisher Susan Plagemann departed for Vogue, joining the very company, Condé Nast, that had just cast Cardone aside. Clinton acted fast, and Cardone was installed as publisher there by December 7.

Still, Cardone had to suffer through a few weeks of unemployment, and she confessed to us that she frequently trolled the job boards at mediabistro.com. To paraphrase Us Weekly: publishers, they’re just like us!

Also last night, after a heartfelt welcome of Cardone to the Hearst family, Black, wearing a black shift dress with a fur wrapped around her shoulders, said, “If it seems like I’m overdressed, I am. I’m going to Lady Gaga!”

Previously: Gourmet Publisher Finds A Home At Marie Claire

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: The Year’s Biggest Moves In Media

door.jpgThis year — full of flux and uncertainty about where the media is heading — has resulted in a vast number of job changes and departures across all matter of media companies and publications. In almost every field of journalism, big names have either been fired, promoted, retired, or simply moved on to more lucrative positions. Here, we take a look back at the biggest industry shakeups of 2009.

The Biggest Move in Magazines: Stephen Adler leaving BusinessWeek.
When editor Stephen Adler announced his departure from BusinessWeek this October following the magazine’s sale to Bloomberg LP, he wasn’t just making a statement, he was starting a trend. Soon he was followed by some of his former colleagues, like John Byrne and BusinessWeek‘s president Keith Fox, who decided to stay with magazine’s original parent, McGraw-Hill. (Not to mention all of those who involuntarily left the pub not long after.) It takes a lot of chutzpah to up and quit your editor gig in the middle of this turbulent media landscape, it takes even more to get your coworkers to come with you. Fortunately for Adler, he’s already landed another gig at Thomson Reuters.

Runners Up: Time.com managing editor Josh Tyrangiel comes on board as editor at Businessweek; Marie Claire‘s publisher Susan Plagemann joins Vogue; Nancy Berger Cardone of shuttered Gourmet takes Plagemann’s spot at Marie Claire; Janice Min leaves Us Weekly; Mariette DiChristina becomes Scientific American‘s first female editor-in-chief.

More after the jump

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Gourmet Publisher Finds A Home At Marie Claire

prar01_cardone212-1.jpgNancy Berger Cardone, formerly the publisher of the much-missed Gourmet, has been named vice president and publisher of Hearst‘s Marie Claire. She replaces Susan Plagemann, who left the women’s magazine last month to take on the role of publisher at Vogue, which is owned by Cardone’s former employer, Condé Nast.

The move marks a return to women’s magazine for Cardone, who served as publisher at Condé-owned Allure for eight years before making the move to Gourmet in 2008. During her short time at the epicurean mag, Cardone helped launch the social networking site GourmetGuestList.com and exec produced the magazine’s PBS series, “Gourmet’s Adventures With Ruth.” She will no doubt be looked to at Marie Claire to further brand expansion across many platforms, like the magazine’s current partnership with “Project Runway.”

Full release after the jump

Previously: Plagemann Jumps To Vogue, One Last Gourmet Party

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