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Posts Tagged ‘The Guardian’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Coulson Gets 18 Months | SiriusXM Fires Opie & Anthony‘s Cumia

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Andy Coulson Gets 18 Months in Tabloid Phone Hacking (NYT)
Andy Coulson, a former senior editor in Rupert Murdoch’s news empire and a onetime adviser to Prime Minister David Cameron, was sentenced on Friday to 18 months in prison for his part in the phone hacking scandal that convulsed Britain’s press, police and political elite and inspired calls for tighter regulation of journalists. HuffPost / AP Coulson was convicted June 24 after an eight-month trial triggered by a tabloid-wrongdoing scandal that led Murdoch to shut down the News of The World in 2011. Another former editor, Rebekah Brooks, and four others were acquitted. The Guardian The offense carries a maximum sentence of two years’ imprisonment, but Coulson received a discount of several months for his previous good character. He could be out in less than nine months because, as a non-violent offender, he is required to serve just half his sentence. THR Three other former News of the World staffers and one private investigator who hacked phones for the paper also pleaded guilty to hacking and also received their sentences Friday. They are former news desk editors Greg Miskiw, James Weatherup and Neville Thurlbeck, as well as Glenn Mulcaire, a private investigator who was used for hacking. Miskiw and Thurlbeck were sentenced to six months each, Weatherup got a suspended sentence of four months, and Mulcaire was given a suspended sentence of six months. Variety Coulson faces a retrial along with former royals editor Clive Goodman on separate charges that they made illegal payments to police officers to obtain royal phone directories. Over a period of more than a decade, journalists at the now-shuttered Sunday paper listened in on thousands of voicemails belonging to celebrities, politicians and crime victims.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: USA Loss Draws 22 Million | WSJ Cuts Newsroom Staff

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21.6 Million Watch USA-Belgium Match on ESPN, Univision (TVNewser)
Between ESPN and Univision, 21.6 million viewers watched Tuesday’s USA-Belgium World Cup match — 16.5 million on ESPN and another 5.1 million on Univision. New York Post The broadcast’s workday time slot meant ESPN’s coverage of USA-Belgium was only the second most watched World Cup game so far. ESPN said the viewership of Tuesday’s nailbiter failed to top the USA-Portugal game, which drew 18.22 million viewers. That game aired on a Sunday evening. Deadline Hollywood While not the record-breaking 10.4 million who tuned in for Mexico’s loss on June 29 to the Netherlands nor the 6.5 million who saw Portugal tie Team USA, Tuesday’s Univision viewership was better than the 3.4 million who watched America’s 1-0 loss to Germany on June 26. Online, Univision Digital saw a record-breaking 1.8 million unique viewers watch Tuesday’s game. AllFacebook The Facebook Data Science Team reported that the match yielded 21 million interactions (posts, comments and likes) from 13 million users globally, including more than 6.5 million interactions from some 4.1 million U.S. users. Variety For the World Cup through the Round of 16, ESPN and ABC averaged 4.08 million viewers — a record audience for the tournament, up 44 percent from 2010 (2.84 million) and 122 percent from 2006 (1.84 million).

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When Working, Henry Blodget Prefers to Stand

BusinessInsiderLogoAs Business Insider prepares to launch this fall its seventh international site – Business Insider UK – Guardian U.S. business correspondent Dominic Rushe caught up with CEO Henry Blodget in New York. Rushe’s article leads off with an intriguing, HB work habits reminder:

His desk is easy to spot in the open newsroom. It’s raised so he can spend the day working on his feet. The desks on either side are raised too. “That’s peer pressure for you,” he says.

He decided to stop sitting after reading articles on BI’s website about the health hazards. “More Terrifying Facts About How Sitting Will Kill You,” reads one. “ARE YOU SITTING DOWN? Watch Out! Your Job May Be Literally Killing You,” reads another.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Abramson Gets New Gig | Twitter COO Resigns

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Jill Abramson to Teach at Harvard (FishbowlNY)
Jill Abramson, the former executive editor of The New York Times who was unceremoniously fired last month, has a new gig — teacher. Abramson is joining Harvard University’s English department this coming fall to teach undergraduate courses on narrative nonfiction. NYT Abramson, the first woman to hold the top editing post at the Times, was abruptly dismissed last month by the newspaper’s publisher, Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr. Her firing stunned the Times newsroom and the media world in general. Sulzberger said she was dismissed because of her management style, while other published accounts said she was paid less than her predecessor, Bill Keller, an allegation that Sulzberger denied. Capital New York Abramson, a Harvard alum, will hold the title of visiting lecturer at the university for the 2014-2015 school year. THR “Narrative non-fiction journalism is more important than ever,” Abramson said in a statement. “Its traditions and how it is changing in the digital transition are fascinating areas of study.” Politico / Dylan Byers on Media During a May commencement address at Wake Forest, her first and only public appearance since her termination, Abramson said she did not know what her next career move would be after the Times. Abramson has previously taught journalism seminars at Yale and Princeton.

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Who Should Oliver Stone Cast as Edward Snowden?

ShutterstockEdNortonOliver Stone calls the narrative at the center of Guardian journalist Luke Harding‘s tome The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World’s Most Wanted Man “one of the greatest stories of our time.” With the announcement that Stone will work closely with the British newspaper to adapt the book into a big-budget Hollywood movie, the next question becomes our headline.

The first name that popped to mind for FishbowlNY is Edward Norton, and not just because he shares the same first name. Yes, Norton is considerably older than the 30-year-old Snowden, but this terrific, fiercely intellectual actor could easily handle that challenge and certainly wouldn’t be the first thespian to portray someone younger on screen. Norton previously starred in Stone’s 1996 drama The People vs. Larry Flynt.

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Brooklyn Magazine Spotlights the Concept of ‘Duende’

TableTalkLogoEsoteric doesn’t even begin to describe Table Talk, a print magazine launched last week at The Schoolhouse in Brooklyn’s Bushwick neighborhood.

The magazine’s 21-year-old publisher, Benjamin Moe, is the son of two Columbia University language professors; one of the contributors to the first issue, Jazra Khaleed, is a Chechen poet who writes in Greek; and as a whole, Table Talk is aiming to wedge into the vacant space between faculty and student publications to popularize the concept of “duende.” From Guardian U.S. weekend editor Martin Pengelly‘s report:

As the first issue of Moe’s magazine points out, duende does not just mean, in the words of the Spanish poet Federico García Lorca, “the mysterious power everyone feels but no philosopher explains” when confronted by great art or performance.

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Aron Pilhofer Joins The Guardian; Elle and Mashable Add Editors

A few more moves today, involving The Guardian, Elle and Mashable. Details are below.

  • Aron Pilhofer is leaving The New York Times for The Guardian. Pilhofer had been with the Times since 2005, most recently serving as associate managing editor for digital strategy. At The Guardian, Pilhofer will serve as executive editor of digital, a new role at the company.
  • Elle has added Rebecca Traister and Amanda Fortini as contributing editors. Traister will continue as a senior editor at The New Republic. Fortini’s work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, New York and more.
  • Louise Roug has been named Mashable’s first global news editor. Roug was formerly the foreign editor for Newsweek and The Daily Beast, from 2010 to 2013.

Guardian Critic Slams Cannes Film Festival Opener

Grace of MonacoA few lucky New York journalists are in the south of France today for the start of the Cannes Film Festival. Although if you go by Guardian film critic Peter Bradshaw‘s assessment of the opening night gala, not so lucky if they have to sit through Grace of Monaco starring Nicole Kidman.

From Bradshaw’s one-star review of the forthcoming Weinstein Company drama:

It is a film so awe-inspiringly wooden that it is basically a fire-risk. The cringe-factor is ionospherically high. A fleet of ambulances may have to be stationed outside the Palais to take tuxed audiences to hospital afterwards to have their toes uncurled under general anaesthetic…

The resulting film about this fantastically boring crisis is like a 104-minute Chanel ad, only without the subtlety and depth. Princess Grace herself is played by Nicole Kidman, wafting around the Palace with dewy-eyed features and slightly parted lips which make her look like a grown-up Bambi after a couple of cocktails, suddenly remembering mother’s violent death in the forest.

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Peekster Adds NYT, WSJ and Washington Post Content

TechCrunch’s Disrupt NY 2014 is in full swing. And to frame some first-day news shared by free UK App Peekster, the site turned to its London-based reporter Natasha Lomas.

As Lomas explains, the App is targeted mainly at 35-and-over print newspaper readers who do a lot of newspaper reading during their daily public-transit commute. To a mix of six British newspapers, Peekster has as of this week added the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and Washington Post:

Users of Peekster can whip out their Smartphone and digitally ‘clip’ an article from the paper edition they’re reading by scanning a few words from the headline or first paragraph.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Court Torn Over Aereo | Time Inc. Board Revealed | Comcast Gains Soar

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Supreme Court Justices Express Concern Over Scope of Aereo Ruling (TVNewser)
While hearing oral arguments from attorneys representing the broadcast networks and Aereo Tuesday morning, the Supreme Court justices “appeared unsure” how to rule in the case. Reuters Aereo, backed by media mogul Barry Diller’s IAC/InterActiveCorp, could be forced to shut down if the court rules for the companies challenging the startup. A win for Aereo could spur innovation in the television industry by paving the way to new, cheaper ways for consumers to watch shows. A decision is due by the end of June. Bloomberg Hearing arguments Tuesday in Washington, some justices suggested they viewed Aereo as violating broadcaster copyrights by using thousands of dime-sized antennas to get over-the-air signals without paying fees. “There’s no technological reason for you to have 10,000 dime-sized antennas other than to get around the copyright laws?” Chief Justice John Roberts asked. At the same time, the hour-long hearing didn’t clearly indicate the likely outcome, as justices including Stephen Breyer repeatedly asked whether a ruling favoring the broadcasters would imperil the cloud computing business. Variety Some of the justices on Tuesday suggested that they faced a challenge in defining just what Aereo is, and drawing a line on where privately used consumer technology ends and a publicly performing service begins. The Washington Post Aereo argued that its thousands of antennas are essentially rented to subscribers of its $8-a-month service for users to pull programs from the public airwaves legally and then store in Internet server files to watch at their convenience. In that way, it is just a mediator, the company argued, with consumers in control of how they use the company’s antennas and storage files for pulling and recording programs from the airwaves. Most of the arguments, which lasted more than an hour, were focused on the justice’s queries about the definition of public and private performances in copyright law and how Aereo differs from cable, satellite and other Internet video firms that pay broadcasters retransmission and other license fees.

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