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Posts Tagged ‘The Washington Post’

Two More Awards for New Yorker Freelance Writer Sarah Stillman

Sarah Stillman is a New York-based journalist. She has written about Iraq and Afghanistan for several publications or online sites, including Slate, The Washington Post, the Nation and the Dallas Morning News.

Stillman, the inaugural winner of the New York University Carter Journalism Institute’s Reporting Award, has added two trophies to her mantle. Her piece in the June 6, 2011 issue of the New Yorker was entitled “Invisible Army.”  She documents poor treatment of Third-World nationals working on U.S. military bases in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“Sarah’s compelling story is a perfect representation of the work we’re trying to encourage at a time of cutbacks in editorial budgets,” said Stephen Solomon, associate director of the Institute.

The Reporting Award, in its second year, funds articles on under-reported subjects in the public interest.

Stillman was decorated with the Hillman Prize for Magazine Journalism and National Magazine Award in the category of public interest.

WaPo Names John Temple New Managing Editor

The Washington Post has named John Temple its new Managing Editor. Temple was most recently the founding editor of Honolulu Civil Beat, an online news site. Prior to that he was the Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of the Rocky Mountain News, which folded in 2009. Marcus Brauchli, the Executive Editor of WaPo, said Temple was the perfect candidate for the job.

“As a managing editor for The Post, John will ensure that the coverage we provide to our print and digital audiences is smart, original and acutely attentive to our audience,” said Brauchli. “He’ll help us to build on the rapid growth we’ve enjoyed recently with readers who come to us through our website, on mobile devices, or through new platforms like the incredibly successful Washington Post Social Reader on Facebook.”

Temple’s first day is April 30.

WaPo, New York Times, WSJ Run Same Photo on Front Page

It’s extremely rare for three of the biggest papers in the nation to run the same photograph on their front pages on the same day, but that’s exactly what happened today. The Washington Post, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal all ran Rodrigo Abd’s picture of a young boy mourning the loss of his father — who was killed by a sniper — in Syria.

Merrill D. Oliver, the Times’ Page One Photo Editor for Thursday, said Abd’s photograph was too powerful to pass up. “It’s always horrible when people are grieving a death, but something about a child just raises it to be that much more painful,” Oliver explained. “The emotion in his face just kind of takes you by the throat.”

[Paper pic via Romenesko]

WaPo Offers Buyouts to Some Staffers

Newspapers offering buyouts is beginning to become quite common. The latest to offer staffers a paid way out the door is The Washington Post, which has offered buyouts in the past. Per a memo from Executive Editor Marcus Brauchli, only a limited amount of people will be able to accept the offer, since WaPo can “absorb staffing changes better in some areas than in others.”

The announcement unfortunately comes the same day as this Forbes story, which details how WaPo missed out on becoming one of the earliest investors in Facebook. That’s some bad timing.

More from the memo, which was obtained by Jim Romenesko:

In those departments where we do offer the buyout, there will be caps on the number of people who can participate, in order to moderate the impact and preserve our competitiveness in core coverage areas. In addition, we may turn down some volunteers if we feel their departure would impair our journalism. That said, it is important that we achieve real savings.

Any measure like this is difficult. But we believe this approach is a sensible and effective way of addressing the economic forces affecting our industry.

WaPo Managing Editor Moves Back to WSJ

Raju Narisetti has departed the Washington Post and rejoined the Wall Street Journal. He will be the Managing Editor of The Wall Street Journal Digital Network, which includes wsj.com, SmartMoney.com and MarketWatch.

Narisetti will also be Deputy Managing Editor of the Journal. Narisetti last worked for the company in 2006, as editor of the Wall Street Journal Europe.

“Raju has done remarkable work as the digital czar at the Washington Post, integrating print and online businesses, building a successful web site, and developing key relationships with the digerati,” said Robert Thomson, Editor-in-Chief of Dow Jones and Managing Editor of the Journal.

Narisetti succeeds Kevin Delaney, who departed wsj.com yesterday.

Former Engadget EIC to Pen Column for The Washington Post

Joshua Topolsky, the former Editor-in-Chief at AOL’s Engadget and founding Editor-in-Chief of The Verge, is going to have a weekly column in The Washington Post. The column, which will cover technology culture and reviews, debuts today online, and in print on Thursday.

According to a press release obtained by Poynter, the column is part of a collaboration with the Post and The Verge, a technology news site that is launching later this year. As part of this agreement, once the site launches its writers will have their content featured in the Post as well.

“I am looking forward to sharing my passion for technology with The Washington Post’s broad readership at a time when the cultural influence and accessibility of personal technology has never been greater,” said Topolsky.

Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories for the Week

Here’s a look at what FishbowlNY stories made the most buzz this week.

  1. Judge Rules that Reposting an Entire Article Without Permission is “Fair Use,” June 21
  2. How Alec Baldwin Got an Overworked AOL Blogger Fired, June 22
  3. New York Launches Dating Website, June 20 (left)
  4. Gothamist is Looking for Journalists to Write Long-Form Features, June 23
  5. Why The Washington Post Passed on the Vargas Story, June 23
  6. AOL/Huffington Post Considering Paid Content, June 21
  7. Pulitzer Prize Winning Journalist Reveals He’s an Illegal Immigrant, June 22
  8. Al Qaeda “Hit List” Targets Media Execs, June 17

Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign-up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Why The Washington Post Passed on the Vargas Story

Yesterday FishbowlNY told you about the fascinating revelation by Jose Antonio Vargas that he was an illegal immigrant. We also mentioned that a piece by Vargas would be published in the upcoming New York Times Magazine, and as the day went on, we found out that The Washington Post had passed on the story.

It was a puzzling decision, especially since it’s such an interesting tale and Vargas had won a Pulitzer for his work at the Post. Today, we get some insight into why, exactly, the paper let Vargas’ story go to another outlet. Apparently the piece was all set to run in the Post’s Outlook section, when concerns over some facts in Vargas’ article arose:

Read more

New York Times Adds Web Editor from The Washington Post

Mike McPhate is leaving his position as Entertainment & Lifestyle Web Editor for The Washington Post to join The New York Times. According to a memo obtained by our friends at FishbowlDC, McPhate will be working on the homepage for the Times’ website.

McPhate’s last day at WaPo is June 1st.

Media Giants Gang Up on News Reader App Zite over Alleged Copyright Violations

The Apple iPad news reader app Zite has been making some powerful enemies.

Kara Swisher reports that a round-up of scary media giants including The Washington Post, AP, Gannett, Getty Images, Time, Dow Jones, and many other organizations issued a cease-and-desist letter today to Zite, a content aggregator, citing a ton of copyright violations.

“The Zite application is plainly unlawful,” said the letter to Zite CEO Ali Davar.

“It’s a bummer that they did this, but we expected it,” Davar told Swisher, sounding less terrified than we would have thought. Yeah, it does seem like sort of a bummer.

Davar said Zite, which aggregates personalized content by getting cues from user interest, would comply with the cease-and-desist letter by shifting the content from its “reading” mode to a Web one, which actually points to publisher sites.

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