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Posts Tagged ‘travel writing’

Outside Seeks Inspiring Adventure Stories With a Strong News Hook

Outside-Oct-2014-coverOutside, which was founded in 1977, has gone through plenty of reinventions. These days, the mag’s audience is 70 percent male and the pub targets not only those whose days typically involve black-diamond runs, but the city office worker as well, holed up in his cubicle as he saves vacation days for an epic outdoor adventure.

Best bets for Outside newbies are “Dispatches,” from the FOB and “Bodywork,” the magazine’s fitness section, which accepts news items as short as 100 words and reports as long as 1200. Whether you’re pitching stories on exploration, sports, fitness or the environment, make sure it’s timely:

Don’t pitch travel roundups without a news peg. “A pitch on the best hikes in the National Parks probably won’t get you far,” said [senior editor Abe Streep]. But travel news that leads to actionable service — say, a story on how the Grand Canyon’s new permitting system for rafters affects readers — is very welcome. News that leads to service is the ideal: new lodges, new technology, new training tools.

For more advice, including what to pitch to the website, read: How to Pitch: Outside

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Skift Aims to Be the ‘Homepage of the Travel Industry’

Travel writing never seems to lend itself to hard facts or analysis, but, instead, more dramatic tales of great (or terrible) vacations. However, Skift, the website founded by Jason Clampet and Rafat Ali, has a mission to be the hub for travel news — or, as Clampet put it, ”the homepage of the travel industry.”

The two-year-old site publishes stories that are analysis based and thoroughly reported. All departments are open to freelancers, and these cover everything from transportation and hotel news to tourism company initiatives.

And one section is devoted to tech:

“Digital” is another data-driven department that includes tech-related travel stories, such as how travel companies are using apps and other new technologies to boost their business. Clampet said stories covering online booking are often found in this section.

For more pitching tips and the editor’s contact information, read: How to Pitch: Skift.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Market Yourself as a Freelance Travel Writer

Travel writing careerTravel writing is something many freelancers fantasize about. Getting paid to travel the world and eat amazing food — where do I sign up?

Although it sounds exciting in theory, the reality of life as a travel writer is just as stressful and unglamorous as any other freelance career. In the latest Mediabistro feature, one writer discusses the lessons she’s learned after 10 years in the business. One of the most important ones? Market yourself to death:

Years ago I joined Mediabistro’s Freelance Marketplace, and it paid dividends. Soon after I joined, the editor of an in-flight magazine contacted me via my profile, and I wrote a bi-monthly column for him for four years. I continue to be a member and update my clips regularly. You never know when an editor will be looking for a writer just like you! I also read Mediabistro’s How To Pitch articles. Not only do I look at the travel-specific magazines, but also the lifestyle titles to find out how travel pieces I have in mind might fit into their books. At the end of the day, as with all freelance writing, it’s about being innovative and finding unique perspectives on topics that have already been covered, and making the pitch.

To hear more tips on how to create a lasting travel writing career, read: Embarking On My Greatest Adventure: Freelance Travel Writing.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.