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Posts Tagged ‘Vivian Schiller’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Schiller Joins Twitter | Finke Leaving Deadline | NYT Editor to Politico

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Vivian Schiller to Leave NBC News for Twitter (NYT)
In a bid to reinforce Twitter’s mutually beneficial relationships with the news industry, the social networking giant on Thursday appointed Vivian Schiller to a newly created position, head of news and journalism partnerships. Schiller, the chief digital officer for NBC News, will leave NBC and join Twitter in January. At Twitter, she will oversee partnerships with news organizations like NBC, NPR and The New York Times; she worked for all three organizations earlier in her career. Reuters “Excited to join @Twitter as Head of News in January. Leaving @NBCNews at year’s end. Grateful to my beloved colleagues for 2+ great years,” Schiller tweeted on Thursday. Schiller has been considered the front runner for the role meant to be a liaison between Twitter and news organizations. TheWrap In her new position, Schiller will help Twitter take on a more proactive and focused role in newsgathering and reporting. Though Twitter has become a near-essential tool for many reporters and a source of traffic to news sites in its relatively short life, it’s never had a central, dedicated team in place to reach out to newsrooms and articulate the platform’s strategy. TVNewser Schiller resigned from NPR in March 2011, following two controversies, including the very public firing from NPR of Fox News analyst Juan Williams. Prior to NPR, Schiller was a senior vice president of NYTimes.com and, before that, she spent four years as SVP of the Discovery Times Channel, a joint venture of The New York Times and Discovery Communications.

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Vivian Schiller to be Twitter’s Head of News

The screenshot on the right is why we love media reporting. All Things D posted on All Things D that All Things D is reporting that Vivian Schiller, NBC News’ senior VP and chief digital officer, will be Twitter’s head of news.

Schiller has the chops to fill the role, which will require her to bridge the gap between Twitter and the media. Prior to her time at NBC, she served as NPR’s president and CEO for two slightly controversial years. Before that Schiller was a senior VP at The New York Times.

But never mind all that. Did anyone miss All Things D’s involvement in this story? We hope not. Because that is important.

No one does a better job of making themselves part of the news than media reporters. Today we saw some strong work by All Things D.

Ousted NPR CEO Says She Plans to Stay in Journalism

Former NPR CEO Vivian Schiller sat down for an interview with the International Women’s Media Foundation, and announced that despite her controversial ouster from NPR in the fallout of the James O’Keefe sting, she has no plans to leave journalism. She also dismissed charges that sexism had anything to do with her exit.

We couldn’t agree more. Sexism didn’t do Schiller in, it was the cowardice of the NPR board of directors and the organization at large.

NPR Fights Back: Survey Shows Most Listeners of NPR Are Conservative

Steve Inskeep, co-host of NPR’s “Morning Edition,” is stepping up to the plate in defending NPR. He writes for the Wall Street Journal on Thursday:

I can point out that the recent tempests over “perceived bias” have nothing to do with what NPR puts on the air. The facts show that NPR attracts a politically diverse audience of 33.7 million weekly listeners to its member stations on-air. In surveys by GfK MRI, most listeners consistently identify themselves as “middle of the road” or “conservative.”

As for James O’Keefe, the activist whose video prank led to NPR chief executive Vivian Schiller losing her job, Inskeep loftily recounts hearing of the story while he was reporting from Egypt. When he had dinner that night with the NPR Cairo bureau, they barely discussed the NPR news back home. Writes Inskeep:

I noticed a contrast between the news that NPR reports from the Arab world and the news NPR has lately made at home. Each news story revealed the values of the people reporting it… I congratulate Mr. O’Keefe for upholding his values: faith in the power of video to mislead.

Zing! NPR could have used some of Inskeep’s backbone when the O’Keefe story broke, before it fell over itself apologizing and getting rid of people. Now this latest defense might just be too late.

NPR President Vivian Schiller Resigns Over Project Veritas Sting

The NPR board of directors just announced this morning NPR CEO and president Vivian Schiller is stepping down from her positions, effective immediately, in the wake of the Project Veritas undercover sting operation which caught senior fundraiser Ron Schiller–no relation to the newly departed CEO–saying nasty things about the Tea Party.

Board chairman Dave Edwards said in a release: “The Board accepted Vivian’s resignation with understanding, genuine regret and great respect for her leadership of NPR these past two years.” Joyce Slocum, NPR’s senior vice president of legal affairs, will now take over as interim CEO.

Just to put in our two cents, Schiller’s resignation strikes us as completely cowardly and unnecessary. It’s admitting some kind of sweeping wrongdoing where there is none. The sting itself isn’t what may just cost NPR its Federal funds, it’s the organization’s handling of the fallout. NPR made the immediate mistake of admitting organizational wrongdoing–calling Ron Schiller’s statements “appalling” and apologizing like they’d systematically shot the dog of every Tea Party member in the country.

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NPR Creates New Senior Management Role Focused On Diversity

Keith Woods.jpgNational Public Radio is increasing its focus on diversity with the addition of a new senior manager role.

Keith Woods, the dean of faculty at the Poynter Institute, has been named as the first vice president in charge of Diversity in News and Operations for the nonprofit organization. In his new role, Woods, a former consultant to NPR, will “lead the development of NPR’s vision and strategy for diversity, and will play a central role in its implementation across the NPR newsroom, throughout the organization and in the public radio community as a whole,” NPR said. He will join NPR full-time in February.

Woods, a journalism veteran who has served on two Pulitzer Prize juries, will work with NPR’s CEO Vivian Schiller to help broaden the radio network’s content in order to reach a more diverse audience. He will also provide coaching and training throughout the organization and its member stations to help deal with issues of “content, recruiting and workplace environment strategies,” the company said.

Full release after the jump

NPR’s Schiller: “Our Plans For Going Forward Is More”

(Photo by Kenny Irby)

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WNYC Throws A Gala To Thank NYT For Selling Classical Music Station

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Last night, New York public radio station WNYC threw a gala at Gotham Hall to celebrate its recent acquisition of New York’s classical radio station WQXR and honor its former owner, The New York Times Co.

Hosted by Alec Baldwin, the evening featured performances by folksinger Judy Collins and opera diva Deborah Voigt. David Sanger, a New York Times correspondent and host of the “Washington Report” on WQXR — and grandson of the station’s founder Elliott Sanger — presented the Times Co. with an award, accepted by Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr., commemorating the company’s stewardship of WQXR since 1944.

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Later, Baldwin announced that the winner of the evening’s raffle would get a radio — actually, an Internet radio tuned to WQXR. “The New York Times got a piece of glass, for the millions and millions of dollars they’ve coughed up,” he said. “A piece of glass. The winner of the raffle gets a radio.”

(Video and more pictures after the jump)

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The News Literacy Project: Bringing Accountability Into the Classroom

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Vivian Schiller, Soledad O’Brien and Alan Miller Photo via Meredith Goncalves

Last night, Time Warner hosted a litany of major media players, all gathered in support of The News Literacy Project. Founded by Alan Miller, who left his investigative reporter position at the Los Angeles Times to do the unthinkable – teach students to think critically about the barrage of information thrown at them on the Internet — the program attracted the attention of board members like NPR CEO Vivian Schiller, CNN‘s Soledad O’Brien and Paul Mason, formerly of ABC News. Also on hand yesterday evening was The New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr., one of the evening’s co-hosts and participants in last night’s silent auction to raise money for the NLP.

Launched last spring, the NLP brings journalists from across the media world to social studies, English, and history classes in middle and high schools in New York City, Maryland, and Chicago where they teach students how to think critically and pick out reliable information from the overwhelming amount of news that bombards them every day.

Last night’s fundraiser included panels with some of the inaugural members of the program, including Anabel Rivas, a graduate of New York’s Facing History School (one of the three public schools that participated in the first NLP program), as well as Facing History’s principal Gillian Smith, Vice Principal Mark Otto and AP English teacher Kristina Wylie, whose classroom was one of the first to benefit from the News Literacy Program.

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Former Microsoft, Evri Exec To Lead Public Media’s Corporate Sponsorship Firm

moss.jpgNational Public Media, the corporate sponsorship firm for NPR, PBS and Boston-based WGBH, named Stephen Moss its president and chief executive officer yesterday.

It’s a perfect time to announce the change, as NPR is coming off its pledge week and CEO Vivian Schiller just last week proclaimed that her organization had the tools to survive the recession that’s bogged down the media industry.

Moss, a former technology executive with a background in print media, joins NPM from the web technology company Evri, where he served as vice president of business development. Prior to that, Moss worked for Microsoft as VP of sales, and general manager of Bill Gates-owned Corbis. While there, he helped launch the MSN video service. Moss also previously worked as CEO of Internet ad network DoubleClick Media.

Moss started his career in advertising sales at McGraw-Hill‘s magazine publishing division, and he went on to lead sales divisions for Thompson Financial‘s American Banker and BusinessWeek in Asia. He also worked on the agency side at Seavex Limited, working with clients like BusinessWeek and CNN.

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NPR’s Schiller: “Our Plans For Going Forward Is More”

schiller.jpgNPR president and CEO Vivian Schiller claims she is an optimist, yet she opened her keynote address at mediabistro.com’s UGCX conference with a scary premise. “I’d like to start by really, really depressing you,” she said.

Schiller then took a moment to run quickly through some sad statistics of the media industry — statistics we know all too well. Like, for example, 11 percent of full time news jobs were cut in 2008. Or that major newspapers in San Francisco and Boston lose about $1 million a day. Ouch.

“This is pretty grim stuff,” Schiller admitted. “But we’re in the middle of such a change, an evolution or revolution in the news business.”

Schiller said she remains optimistic because new models will rise out of the ashes of the dying media business model.

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