FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Media_Beat

Columbia Pictures VP Devon Franklin: ‘If You Write a Good Script, We’ll Find It’

It’s Devon Franklin‘s job as VP of production for Columbia/Sony Pictures to buy film scripts and see them through the development and production process. So, how can aspiring scribes keep their work out of the slush pile? Take a screenwriting class, enter film competitions, and polish your drafts until they’re perfect.

“Do everything you can to work on these ideas,” Franklin, the man behind Jumping The Broom, explained in our @mediabeat interview. “And I promise you — people think this is crazy — we need good scripts in Hollywood. So, if you write a good script, even if you’re in Nebraska, Ohio — you could be in the most remote part of the world — if you write a good script, I promise you somehow we’ll find it.”

Franklin applied the same principles of diligence and faith in his own life, which he details in his new book Produced By Faith: Enjoy Real Success without Compromising Your True Self (Simon & Schuster).

“The book is a metaphor for your life as a movie, and every movie starts with a big idea,” the author and motivational speaker explained. “My whole big idea for my life is to inspire and encourage, and God has called me to use film as part of a way to do that.”

You can also watch this video on YouTube.

Part 1: Jumping The Broom Production VP Brings Spirituality to Hollywood

Part 3: Columbia Pictures VP Devon Franklin Talks Netflix, Social Media

StumbleUpon CEO: ‘We Refer Almost As Much Traffic As Facebook’

In the overwhelming world of social networks, it’s easy for a publisher, author, or article to get lost in the crowd. The discovery engine StumbleUpon helps millions of readers sort through the mess–generating some impressive traffic in the process.

This week we interviewed StumbleUpon CEO Garrett Camp for mediabistro.com’s Media Beat video show. In the video embedded above, Camp offered some surprising statistics about StumbleUpon’s traffic.

Here’s an excerpt: “We have just under 15 million registered users doing 800 to 850 million Stumbles a month. In terms of traffic, we refer almost as much traffic as Facebook. Which means–if you think about the number of people that click on an external link in a Facebook feed and the amount of people who click on a link in StumbleUpon is about the same in North America.”

Read more

Johnny Temple: ‘You Can’t Keep All Your Eggs in One Basket’

Akashic Books publisher Johnny Temple joined us for a Media Beat interview this week, talking about how he moved from playing in a band to leading a publishing house.

Here’s an excerpt from the interview: “When the bottom fell out of the music business, suddenly record sales plummeted and musicians had to look for multiple income streams to stay afloat. That’s one of the things I learned as a musician–you can’t keep all your eggs in one basket.”

Below we’ve included more interview excerpts with Temple–a publisher and Girls Against Boys bassist. Visit Akashic Books to explore the publisher’s long and varied list.

Read more

Johnny Temple: ‘Authors Don’t Need Agents To Submit To Us’

Akashic Books publisher Johnny Temple joined us for a Media Beat interview this week. In today’s installment, he shared advice for aspiring writers hoping to pitch his literary press.

Here’s an excerpt from the interview: “All of us book publishers these days are inundated with submissions–so many people are writing and there is a great diversity of voices being published. But the flip-side of that is that it is crowded. I think the best way to reach Akashic (or really any publishing company or literary agent for that matter) is to do an end-around–to find someone who we know and trust to recommend you.”

Below we’ve included more interview excerpts with Temple–a publisher and Girls Against Boys bassist. Visit Akashic Books to explore the publisher’s long and varied list.

Read more

Johnny Temple: ‘We in the Publishing Business Need to Complain Less’

Akashic Books publisher Johnny Temple joined us for a Media Beat interview this week, talking about how he transitioned from rock star to literary publisher over the last 10 years.

Here’s an excerpt from today’s installment (embedded above): “I had no publishing background, but looking back, I think it gave me a boost … I was unburdened by this morose attitude in book publishing, [thinking] ‘Nobody reads books anymore, our business is in decline’–all these doom and gloom attitudes. Unfortunately, I’ve never had that.”

Below we’ve included more interview excerpts with Temple–a publisher and Girls Against Boys bassist. Visit Akashic Books to explore the publisher’s long and varied list.

Read more

James Ellroy: ‘It Took Me 6 Published Novels to Tenuously Earn a Living as a Writer’

Novelist James Ellroy joined us for a Media Beat interview this week, talking about his recent memoir (The Hilliker Curse) and outlining his upcoming six-part television series.

Here’s an excerpt from today’s installment (embedded above): “I had a blast as a kid writer … Nobody told me I couldn’t write a novel first crack. Nobody discouraged or encouraged me. I had no family. I had good, clean outdoor work. I caddied at country clubs …  I got sober preceding this. So I was clearheaded, healthy, and very, very ambitious. It took me six published novels to tenuously earn a living as a writer. But I don’t view it as a struggle.”

James Ellroy’s LA: City of Demons premieres on Wednesday, January 19th at 10 p.m. on Investigation Discovery. Follow these links to watch the rest  of the Media Beat interview:

Part One–James Ellroy On His New TV Show
Part Two: James Ellroy on Los Angeles

Read more

Bored to Death Creator Jonathan Ames Gives Screenwriting Tips

Jonathan Ames has written short stories, newspaper columns, and novels in his over twenty years as a writer and author.

In our Media Beat interview, he revealed how he added another title to his resume:  screenwriter and executive producer of HBO’s Bored to Death, a series based on his own short story about a writer turned private investigator.

“I read a number of scripts and I just quickly gleaned that you want to make the descriptions short and to the point and the dialogue lively,” Ames told mediabistro.com founder Laurel Touby. “I did learn as I went along to begin scenes late and end early. You don’t want people walking across the room a lot and ringing doorbells. You know, all that’s gonna chew up screen time and get thrown out anyway. It was just sort of adapting to a form, like adapting to a poetic form like a sonnet. What’s another one? A siesta. No, that’s a nap.”

Watch the full video for more tips (and humor) about Ames’ writing process and to find out why, despite his success, he’s still not ready to settle down.

Part 1: Bored to Death‘s Jonathan Ames on Sex, Insecurity and…Boxing?

Part 3: Jonathan Ames Brings “Jonathan Ames” to HBO’s Bored to Death

Terry McMillan’s Advice to Young Authors: ‘Focus on Your Stories, Not the Fame’

With millions of books sold and fans already salivating over news that a film version is in the works for her latest release Getting To Happy, Terry McMillan has accomplished feats in publishing that most scribes could only dream of.

So, what’s the one piece of advice she’d give to those looking to emulate her success?

“I tell a lot of young writers that they should be more concerned about their stories and characters than being famous and even getting published, because when they’re ready they will be published,” she said in the final installment of our Media Beat interview. “Too many of them now all they think about is how much money they’re gonna make, being famous, getting on The New York Times, that’s their goal. And that’s such a phony, superficial, shallow goal to have as a reason for writing.”

Watch the full video to get more of McMillan’s insights on the screenwriting process and to find out why she’s not a Kindle fan.

Part 1: Terry McMillan: From Waiting To Exhale To Getting To Happy

Part 2: Terry McMillan Puts the ‘Ugliness’ of Divorce Behind Her

Terry McMillan Puts the ‘Ugliness’ of Divorce Behind Her

One thing you’ll often hear fans praise about author Terry McMillan is her authenticity. And it doesn’t get any more real than the headline-grabbing drama surrounding her marriage and divorce to Jonathan Plummer.

After McMillan drew from the couple’s island courtship for How Stella Got Her Groove Back, Plummer later famously came out as a gay man. But McMillan says neither the novel nor its accompanying film were completely autobiographical.

“Yes, I went to Jamaica. Yes, I met a younger man. But most of what happened in that book and in the movie didn’t happen to us that way. It was fiction,” the Getting to Happy author explained in our Media Beat interview.

So, what does she think of her ex now? “We’re friends. I’ve forgiven him. One of the reasons I was able to tell [the story of Getting To Happy] is the fact that I really did overcome a lot of things, one of which was anger and bitterness,” she said.

And nothing like a little jerk chicken to ease the pain.

Part 1: Terry McMillan: From Waiting To Exhale To Getting To Happy

Part 3: Terry McMillan’s Advice to Young Authors: ‘Focus on Your Stories, Not the Fame’

Terry McMillan: From Waiting to Exhale to Getting to Happy

Back in the early 90s, Terry McMillan was just another author trying to make it. Then, came a little book called Waiting to Exhale. McMillan’s novel about four single women and their love lives helped birth a new genre of African-American fiction and became a hit film.

Now, over 15 years later, McMillan has released the sequel, Getting to Happy. But she said she never intended to revisit Savannah, Bernie, Gloria, or Robin — in fact, she wasn’t that in love with them in the first place.

“After Waiting to Exhale, I think that book never even crossed my mind when I was telling new stories. And, even with [Getting to Happy], I thought about [the characters] a lot differently,” McMillan said in our Media Beat interview. “I thought they were somewhat… They got on my nerves. I thought that they were a little desperate.”

Watch the full video to hear more of McMillan’s inspiration for Getting to Happy and to find out which segment of Black fiction she is not a fan of.

Part 2: Terry McMillan Puts the ‘Ugliness’ of Divorce Behind Her

Part 3: Terry McMillan’s Advice to Young Authors: ‘Focus on Your Stories, Not the Fame’

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>