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NaNoWriMo

NaNoWriMo Tip #7: Always Carry a Notepad

evernoteIdeas can come at any time. All writers, that certainly includes NaNoWriMo participants, should get in the habit of carrying around a notepad to jot down their thoughts at a moment’s notice.

These days, there are other ways to doodle and scribble besides using pen and paper. The Evernote team recently released the Penultimate app for iOS mobile device users; the developers made it a mission to give users the “most natural digital handwriting experience on iPad.”

This is our seventh NaNoWriMo Tip of the Day. To help GalleyCat readers take on the challenge of writing a draft for a 50,000-word novel in 30 days, we will be offering advice throughout the entire month.

NaNoWriMo Tip #6: Get Comfortable With Telling Lies

When author Mac Barnett gave a talk at TEDx SonomaCounty, he described his occupation as writing “honest lies” for children. Barnett is not the first (nor will he be the last) to point out that being an artist sometimes requires spinning a few tall tales.

To help NaNoWriMo participants get in the right mind frame, we’ve embedded an animated video above that focuses on “The Language of Lying.” We’ve also collected three tips from this TED-Ed lesson:

(1) “Liars reference themselves less when making deceptive statements.”

(2) “Liars tend to be more negative.”

(3) “Liars typically explain events in simple terms.”

This is our sixth NaNoWriMo Tip of the Day. To help GalleyCat readers take on the challenge of writing a draft for a 50,000-word novel in 30 days, we will be offering advice throughout the entire month.

NaNoWriMo Tip #5: Start With a Memorable Introduction

How should you start your NaNoWriMo project? Locking down a memorable introduction may be the best course of action.

The animated video above features a TED-Ed lesson called “The Power of a Great Introduction.” Towards the end, educator Carolyn Mohr shares this warning: “If you’re bored while writing, your reader will be bored while reading.”

This is our fifth NaNoWriMo Tip of the Day. To help GalleyCat readers take on the challenge of writing a draft for a 50,000-word novel in 30 days, we will be offering advice throughout the entire month.

NaNoWriMo Tip #4: 3 Methods to Trigger Story Ideas

Oliver Jeffers 200Before one word is written down, every National Novel Writing Month project starts with a single thought. The question now becomes, what can writers do to trigger story ideas? We’ve collected a list of three helpful methods.

1. The Huffington Post suggests giving “freewriting” a try. This exercise entails that people write without adhering to any sort of structure or restrictions.

2. SHOUTmkt’s infographic, “Simple Ideas to Stimulate Creativity,” recommends that writers “do something different.” The intention behind this act is to break up monotony and allow for new notions to surface.

3. Don’t be a stickler to a schedule! When we sat down for an interview with children’s book creator Oliver Jeffers (pictured, via), he pointed out that “you can’t plan creativity.”

This is our fourth NaNoWriMo Tip of the Day. To help GalleyCat readers take on the challenge of writing a draft for a 50,000-word novel in 30 days, we will be offering advice throughout the entire month.

NaNoWriMo Tip #3: Plant Some Greenery On Your Desk

desk plantWhen tackling a difficult project, looking after one’s well-being can mean the difference between success and failure. If you are trying to write a NaNoWriMo book, perhaps it’s time to put down a plant on your desk.

Scientific research suggests that adding a little greenery to your work environment could help with improving and maintaining wellness. Some of the healthy benefits include clean air, stress reduction, and better focus.

Here’s more from The Huffington Post: “Research shows that keeping plants at our desks can boost our well-being at work – something that’s desperately needed when we hit that 3 p.m. slump each day. Plus, there’s a plethora of research showing that spending time in nature or amidst the color green can lift our moods and boost creativity. With so many perks, why not bring those benefits indoors?”

This is our third NaNoWriMo Tip of the Day. To help GalleyCat readers take on the challenge of writing a draft for a 50,000-word novel in 30 days, we will be offering advice throughout the entire month. (Photo Credit: thechosenrebel)

NaNoWriMo Tip #2: Get Some Pep

Kami GarciaNeed some pep in your step? Every year, the organizers behind National Novel Writing Month reach out to authors to write “pep talks” so that participants can turn to a source of encouragement as they work on this daunting task.

Some of the writers who have contributed essays this year include Divergent trilogy author Veronica Roth250 Things You Should Know About Writing author Chuck Wendig, and Beautiful Creatures series co-author Kami Garcia (pictured, via). Here’s an excerpt from Garcia’s piece:

“Give your friend Doubt a name, and then block his calls. I’m not a fast writer. I type with three fingers, and there’s a video on YouTube to prove it. The way I finish my novels is one word at a time. Don’t focus on 50,000 words or 30 days. Just write one word at a time, and focus on hitting your word-count goal one day at a time.”

This is our second NaNoWriMo Tip of the Day. To help GalleyCat readers take on the challenge of writing a draft for a 50,000-word novel in 30 days, we will be offering advice throughout the entire month.

110 Writing Tools in a Single Post

NaNoWriMo LogoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched over the weekend! During November, writers around the globe attempt to write a draft for a 50,000-word novel in a 30-day period.

To help GalleyCat readers who are taking this challenge, we will be offering advice throughout the month. Last year, 310,095 NaNoWriMo participants wrote a book in 30 days. Since 2006, the writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels.

Every year, we collect and publish links to writing tools and tips to lend a helping hand. For today, we’ve rounded up four years’ worth of advice in a single post for GalleyCat writers. We hope these 110 writing tools will aid those who have signed up to tackle this daunting task.

Read more

Blurb Establishes the Coffee & Quill Society For NaNoWriMo Participants

NaNoWriMo CoverPrepping to take the NaNoWriMo challenge this November? Blurb, an independent book and magazine publishing platform, has established a partnership with National Novel Writing Month.

NaNoWriMo writers are invited to join Blurb’s newly launched Coffee & Quill Society to receive support as they work on their projects. During the 30-day marathon, participants will receive tips through webinars and emails to help with outlining the story of the novel and meeting daily writing goals. Follow this link to watch a webinar featuring Blurb senior content manager Forrest Bryant, NaNoWriMo founder Chris Baty, and NaNoWriMo executive director Grant Faulkner.

Here’s more from the press release: “Blurb is such a believer in new and emerging writers that all Coffee & Quill Society members who complete the NaNoWriMo challenge will receive one copy of their novel in print and ebook form for free. Blurb is the only platform supporting the challenge that enables writers to upload their manuscript and create an ebook and print book from one file. Once writers have uploaded their book, they can utilize the Blurb Global Retail Network that, through a partnership with Ingram Content Group, will enable them to distribute their work to online retailers and bookstores around the world, helping global sales.”

Grammarly Writing Group Publishes NaNoWriMo Novel

grammarlyLast November a group of team members at Grammarly, the online site dedicated to proofreading, wrote a novel during National Novel Writing Month.

This week the group published their book The Lonely Wish-Giver: A Grammo WriMo Novel on Amazon. The eBook is available for $.99 and all of the proceeds will be donated to the Make-a-Wish Foundation.

The book was written by around 300 writers from 27 countries. They called the project #GrammoWriMo. Collectively, the team wrote 130,927 unedited words, almost three times the goal of the challenge’s 50,000 words. Follow this link to read our interview with the group about their experience writing as a team.

 

Grammarly Writer Shares NaNoWriMo Group Writing Experience

nanowrimoA group of team members at Grammarly, the online site dedicated to proofreading, set out to write a novel as a group during National Novel Writing Month. Some of the participants had been a part of NaNoWriMo before, but this was the first time any of the participants had worked on a group novel. The project was a success. Collectively, the team wrote 130,927 unedited words, almost three times the goal of the challenge’s 50,000 words.

GalleyCat caught up with Allison VanNest, head of communications at Grammarly, to discuss the process.

GC: Why did you decide to do a NaNoWriMo novel as a group?

AV: Many of us on the Grammarly team are – or have been – participants in National Novel Writing Month. It is a great mental exercise for participants who want to get into the habit of writing more frequently. However, life is busy. Some people are scared away from signing up for NaNoWriMo by the 50,000-word writing requirement. Although this is an attainable goal, we wanted to create an opportunity for writers to participate in NaNoWriMo that would not be so time-consuming. Read more

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