InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Obituaries

Comic Book Artist Nick Cardy Has Died

aquamanVeteran comic book artist Nick Cardy has died. He was 93 years old.

Cardy was best known for his work with DC Comics and his work drawing Teen Titans and Aquaman. According to NickCardy.com, Cardy worked for the Iger/Eisner studio drawing for Fight Comics, Jungle Comics, Kaanga Comics for Fiction House. In the fifties he drew the Tarzan comic strip. When he started his career at DC Comics, he drew The Legends of Daniel Boone, a comic with only a couple of issues. In the 1970s he created artwork for movie posters including: Apocalypse Now, Movie, Movie and California Suite.

In 2005, Cardy was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame. (Via Comicbook.com)

 

Ann Jonas Has Died

9780688099862Picture book creator Ann Jonas has passed away. She was 81-years-old.

Jonas studied at Cooper Union. She worked in the graphic design industry prior to establishing a career as a writer and illustrator.

Here’s more from Publishers Weekly: “She published her first picture book, When You Were a Baby, in 1982, and 15 additional titles, many released by Greenwillow, followed. Her books include Round Trip (1983), an ALA Notable Book and a New York Times Best Illustrated Book, The Quilt (1984), Color Dance (1989), Aardvarks, Disembark! (1990), Splash! (1995), Watch William Walk (1997), and Bird Talk (1999).

Oscar Hijuelos Has Died

u7143

Cuban American novelist Oscar Hijuelos has passed away. He was 62 years old.

He became the first Latino to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction with The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love in 1989. Hijuelos wrote eight novels and a memoir called Thoughts Without Cigarettes. In an interview about that memoir, the novelist reflected on his early inspiration as a kid growing up in New York City:

I don’t think the New York of my youth did a “better job” of fostering creativity, which comes from within and not from without, but it did offer the average kid a much broader range of choices in terms of affordable and inspiring activities; just about everything was much cheaper. And there were a greater range of interesting mom-and-pop shops to enjoy: For example, I miss the old second-hand bookstores that one could find on Fourth Avenue and getting lost in that world. Surely you can find the same stuff these days on the Internet, but it’s just not as much fun. I can remember how one could walk into the Pierpont Morgan Library for free—now it’s about twenty dollars—and the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a buck or two, or see a Broadway show for ten bucks.

Tom Clancy Has Died

TomClancy304Bestselling novelist Tom Clancy has passed away, ending a legendary career in espionage fiction.

Three of his books were turned into movies: The Hunt for Red October, Patriot Games, and The Sum of All Fears. His work was adapted into a number of video game franchises, including: Rainbow Six, Ghost Recon and Splinter Cell. CNN had the sad news:

[Clancy] died on Tuesday in a hospital in Baltimore. He was 66. The author Tom Clancy in 1996. Ivan Held, the president of G. P. Putnam’s Sons, his publisher, did not provide a cause of death.

Robert Barnard Has Died

4325_1528497

UK crime novelist Robert Barnard has passed away. He was 76-years-old.

Throughout the course of his career, Barnard (pictured, via) wrote 40 books and earned eight Edgar Award nominations. He enjoyed a following both in his native Great Britain and the United States. Here’s more from the New York Times:

Mr. Barnard called his work ‘entertainment’ and ‘deliberately old-fashioned.’ His murders, set mainly in small villages drolly christened with names like ‘Hexton-on-Weir’ and ‘Twytching,’ were plotted with an ingenuity and precision that made him popular among aficionados of what is known in publishing as the English cozy — mysteries with a picturesque setting, colorful locals and minimal violence. Reviewers said that many of his books crossed into the comedy-of-manners genre.

Conan Gorenstein Has Died

Hachette Book Group sales rep and bookseller Conan Gorenstein passed away this week. He was 64 years old.

Gorenstein joined the publisher in 1991, working New York State, Vermont, Northeastern Pennsylvania and Connecticut. The publisher offered this tribute:

In his 22 years of service, Conan was a passionate sales rep, always interested in doing the best for HBG and his accounts Additionally, Conan was known far & wide for his cooking and kitchen experimentation – many accounts, authors & colleagues were delighted with his never-ending supply of baked goods … As many of us knew, Conan was a lover & aficionado of Magic, as his membership in the International Brotherhood of Magicians can attest to.

Ann Crispin Has Died

Author and Writer Beware co-founder Ann Crispin has passed away.

Making Light posted the sad news and novelist John Scalzi shared a tribute to the science fiction writer. Earlier this week, she posted a final message for readers and writers on Facebook:

I want you all to know that I am receiving excellent care and am surrounded by family and friends. I wish all aspiring writers the will to finish and a good contract. Please continue to monitor Writer Beware and be careful who you sign with. Victoria Strauss and Richard White are there to help.

Read more

Frederik Pohl Has Died

The great science fiction writer and editor Frederik Pohl has passed away. Over the course of his prolific career, Pohl won three Nebula Awards and six Hugo Awards for his visionary work.

At Wikipedia, you can see a long list of the science fiction books and stories that he wrote. A brief post about his passing noted that “Fred left a thick file of things he wanted to tell you,” promising to include more material on his blog. Here’s more about his life and work:

Apart from the field of science fiction, he is a noted lecturer and teacher in the area of future studies, and is the author of, among other non-fiction works,Practical Politics, a how-to-do-it manual of the American political process; Our Angry Earth, on the world’s environmental problems, written in collaboration with the late Isaac Asimov, which Sir Arthur C. Clarke calls “perhaps the most important book either of its authors has produced”; and, most recently,Chasing Science, on the uses of science as a spectator sport. He is also the Encyclopedia Britannica‘s authority on the First Century A.D. Roman emperor, Tiberius.

Read more

Seamus Heaney Has Died

Nobel Prize winning poet Seamus Heaney has passed away. He was 74.

Follow the links below to read free poems by Heaney from the Poetry Foundation. Here’s more about his early life from the Nobel Prize site:

The poet’s mother came from a family called McCann whose connections were more with the modern world than with the traditional rural economy; her uncles and relations were employed in the local linen mill and an aunt had worked “in service” to the mill owners’ family. The poet has commented on the fact that his parentage thus contains both the Ireland of the cattle-herding Gaelic past and the Ulster of the Industrial Revolution; indeed, he considers this to have been a significant tension in his background, something which corresponds to another inner tension also inherited from his parents, namely that between speech and silence. His father was notably sparing of talk and his mother notably ready to speak out, a circumstance which Seamus Heaney believes to have been fundamental to the “quarrel with himself” out of which his poetry arises.

Read more

Blind Wonder Cat Homer Has Died

A real life galley cat has passed away. Homer, the cat who starred in Gwen Cooper‘s Homer’s Odyssey: A Fearless Feline Tale, or How I Learned about Love and Life with a Blind Wonder Cat memoir, has died.

Cooper donates 10 percent of the royalties from Homer’s Odyssey to “organizations that serve abused, abandoned, and disabled animals.” In honor of the late cat, she has also created “Homer’s Heroes Fund”–a yearly donation to “a shelter or rescue group that does outstanding work with ‘special needs’ animals.” She wrote an online tribute to her beloved cat:

He was just one cat. One tiny, big-hearted, irrepressible, brave and loyal little cat. Who could possibly have foreseen that he would come to mean so much to so many? Those of us who work in animal rescue believe that every animal matters. We believe that every life—no matter how small, or how steep the odds are against it—can make a difference. Every animal who’s given the chance to love and be loved can make someone else’s life better, can fill up empty places in our hearts we didn’t even know were there until they were full. And, once in a great while, one tiny creature can have a spirit so big that it spills over and makes the whole world just a little bit better, and happier, and more inspired, than it was before. Even in the darkest places are small lights that can grow and grow until they warm us all.

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>