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Readers

How to Celebrate Book Lovers Day

Happy Book Lovers Day!

According to Holiday Insights, the holiday is listed on two dates, but a “vast majority of sites list it on August 9th. A smaller number of sites have it recorded on the first Saturday in November.”

How will you celebrate? Below, we’ve created a list of five suggestions. (Photo Credit: brewbooks)

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OED Seeks Early Example of ‘Def’ Usage

The editors of the Oxford English Dictionary have reached out to readers around the globe, seeking an example of “def” used in popular culture before 1981. You can read the current “def” definition at this link.

Do you remember reading or listening to that word before 1981? You could get your find added to the prestigious dictionary. Here’s more from the editors, but you should read the whole fascinating post:

The word def, meaning ‘excellent; outstanding; “cool”’ is one of the earliest and most prominent terms to come to mainstream slang from hip-hop, but its early history is shrouded in confusion. The first clear example recorded in the OED is actually from language writer William Safire … it seems likely that def originated among rap musicians as a variant of death in expressions like to be death on in the sense ‘to be extremely good at’.

Homemade Book Dress Goes Viral

Reader Jorimoo created an entire dress out of book pages, earning more than 86,000 views online for her literary creation.

We’ve embedded her photos above–what do you think? Here’s more from the photo gallery of the dress: “here is the long awaited photos!!! A dress I made entirely from the pages of a book! Modeled here by myself at a readers and writers festival”

If you are looking for more, Google has a massive collection of images called “Dress Made of Books.” (Via Ted Weinstein Lit.)

SiriusXM Closes Book Radio Channel

Satellite radio provider SiriusXM has closed its SiriusXM Book Radio channel. In a statement to listeners, the company said “our commitment to books and authors remains high across many channels.”

A number of Book Radio shows have moved to other stations. The “Pia Lindstrom Presents” show has moved to SiriusXM Stars (SiriusXM channel 106) on Saturdays at 12 p.m. ET. Former Book Radio host Maggie Linton now has a daily show on SiriusXM Urban View (SiriusXM channel 110) running Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET.

Classic radio theater and stories continue on Radio Classics (SiriusXM channel 82), and audiobooks air on our “Late Night Read” show at night on SiriusXM Stars … Additionally, we will continue our “Author Confidential” series, featuring top authors, and former publisher Judith Regan continues her weekly interview show on Saturdays at 10am on SiriusXM Stars. We encourage you to tune in to a wide variety of author interviews and discussions on many of our shows and channels, including Bob Edwards on SiriusXM Public Radio (Sirius channel 205 and XM channel 121) and Pete Dominick on SiriusXM Indie (SiriusXM channel 104).

(Via R.L. Stine)

How To Share Books with Prisoners

As you enjoy your summer reading this year, you should take some time to remember all the readers in prison around the country.

To find out more about sharing books with prisoners, we caught up with author and former inmate John Espinosa Nelson. Nelson is raising funds on Kickstarter for his prison memoir, Where Excuses Go to Die. He reminded us why these books matter in prison:

I once knew a voracious reader who’d struggled with his wife over a gun; it had gone off and he’d been given life for her murder. He never spoke of mitigating circumstances or of his trial. The guy looked like Jack Lemon with a mustache and was just as nice. He possessed photo albums stuffed with happy family pictures, and few of us believed he’d killed his wife on purpose. But who can say? We did know that he read an epic novel every five-day week   –Michener, Clavell, Clancy, Rand, King–   plus smaller titles on the weekends. Reading was his passion and his one “tell” that betrayed his fear of inward thought. He was witty, short, and only about 40, but he was tragic and lonely too. He would have read every book in that facility’s library had it not been for the paperback donations that arrived each month. I think those saved him. I know they helped saved me. I clerked for two civilian employee prison librarians.

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The Top of the Top Books Lists

One reader created a massive chart collecting and comparing the top 100 books mentioned across eleven different top 100 lists. Joseph HellerVladimir Nabokov and  F. Scott Fitzgerald led the rankings, appearing on ten out of the eleven lists.

You can explore the complete list at the Scribd link embedded below (along with how many times the individual books appeared on the eleven different lists). Below, we’ve also linked to free samples of the top ten books on this list. Check it out:

This post linked to 10+ “Top 100″ book lists from sources such as TIME magazine, Entertainment Weekly, Modern Library, etc. They were all in such different formats, and such different ways of being presented that I wanted to amalgamate all of these into one master “list” in order to compare them (thirteen lists in total since I also added in the first 100 of the Reddit’s 200 favorite books). I have since thrown this into a pdf file on Scribd if anyone is interested. My next step was to compare each of these and see what books are most recommended in top lists … I made one giant list that combined 11 “Top 100″ Book Lists.

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How To Turn Off Royal Baby Coverage

Are you sick of all the coverage about the royal baby about to be born in London?

The Guardian newspaper will help you turn off all the news about Prince WilliamKate Middleton and royal baby coverage.

Simply click the “Not a royalist” button in the upper right hand corner of the Guardian website to read the news in peace. Unfortunately, they have not developed a similar button for your Facebook and Twitter feeds.

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Gilmore Girls Inspires Reading Challenge

During the seven year run of Gilmore Girls, main character Rory Gilmore read 340 books on screen. Now one writer aims to read them all in real life.

Australian writer and playwright Patrick Lenton has launched the Rory Gilmore Reading Challenge online, aiming to tackle that massive reading list. Read his first post and check out the massive list of books that Rory read:

In Gilmore Girls, aka the best show ever written, bright-eyed Rory Gilmore is continually seen reading a wide array of books. Whether in preparation for Harvard or for her time at Yale, she is always improving herself via literature. Juxtapose this with Patrick Lenton, who found himself re-reading The Wheel of Time for the seventeenth time, grimly hoping the ingrained misogyny might somehow disappear if he just believed hard enough. What happened to his days of challenging himself? What about that one time he read Moby Dick and felt good for eight years? Patrick decided to take a leaf out of Rory’s books and read Rory’s books.

Books on the Underground Campaign Shares Free Books

A creative at London’s Leo Burnett ad agency launched Books on the Underground, a charity project to share books in the subway. Creative Hollie Belton explained her nonprofit project:

I started it by leaving my own books, or raiding charity shops … The idea is to take an incredible book you want to share with the world, sticker it up, and leave it on the tube, where it can be taken, read, shared, and most importantly, enjoyed. Think of us as your local library, but without the late fees. Just be sure to put them back when you’ve finished.

Anyone can participate, leaving a book on the subway with a special Books on the Underground sticker that encourages readers to share photographs or tweet about where they discovered the book.

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Why You Should Read Introductions at the End of the Book

One Reddit user posted a photograph (embedded above) of a single note scribbled in the introduction of a library book: “This intro reveals the novel’s end.” I wholeheartedly support this annotation.

When do you read the introduction to a book? As a reader, I hate spoilers. If I really care about a book or an author, I won’t read the reviews until after I’ve finished the book. I like forming my own opinions, and then arguing with the reviewer later (in my head).

Introductions work the same way. They are usually written by a great scholar or writer, but they generally spoil plot points or reshape the way you read a book. I like to save the introduction of a book until after I’ve read everything–you will look at the book in a whole new way.

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