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Readers

Doctors Prescribe Books to Treat Depression

books304Doctors in Britain are experimenting with a new form of therapy to fight depression that involves reading books. It’s called bibliotherapy and the goal is to help people overcome their disorders by prescribing self-help books including: Overcoming Depression, Mind Over Mood, or The Feeling Good Handbook.

According to a report in The Boston Globe, this new form of therapy goes beyond doctor’s offices. In fact, some booksellers and curating reading lists for people to help them cure their depression. Check it out:

In London, a painter, a poet, and a former bookstore manager have teamed up to offer over-the-counter “bibliotherapy consultations”: after being quizzed about their literary tastes and personal problems, the worried well-heeled pay 80 pounds for a customized reading list. At the Reading Agency, a charity that developed and administers Books on Prescription, a second program called Mood-Boosting Books recommends fiction and poetry. The NHS’s public health and mental health budgets also fund nonprofits such as The Reader Organization, which gathers people who are unemployed, imprisoned, old, or just lonely to read poems and fiction aloud to one another.

Downtown Boston to Become the First Literary Cultural District in the U.S.

27888_10151611296351031_1933499669_nThe downtown Boston area will become the first literary cultural district within the United States. The coordinators behind this initiative will work on boosting tourism, taking part in literary events, and offering for families within the neighborhood.

The initiative came into fruition after a team of book-related organizations won the Adams Planning Grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council. This group includes the Grub Street nonprofit, the Boston Public Library, the Boston Athenaeum, the City of Boston, the Drum and the Boston Book Festival.

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World Book Night Titles Announced for 2014

lwqzpyn7y8q8dmnbh44f-292x300On April 23, 2014, thousands of bibliophiles will give away half million books in the United States to celebrate World Book Night.

Below, we’ve listed the all of the titles that will be given away. To take part in this event, follow this link to learn more details and fill out an application to be a book giver.

Shelf Awareness reports that this year’s selections “includes the first graphic novel, first university press title and first Asian-American authors. As before, one book is in English and Spanish, and two are available in large-print editions. In addition, the 35 titles were an increase from the previous years’ 30, allowing more authors and publishers to be represented.”
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How Technology Empowers Blind Readers

Legal scholar and activist Ron McCallum gave a TED Talk called “How Technology Allowed Me to Read.” Born blind, McCallum is “a voracious reader.”

We’ve embedded the video above–how has technology empowered you as a reader?  McCallum explored how reading technologies helped him become a successful lawyer, an academic researcher and a lifelong reader. Here’s more from the TED blog:

In this talk, McCallum takes us on a tour of the people and technology that allowed him to read — from those who transcribed into braille to the maker of the first blind computer with speech synthesizer, to the inventor behind the Kurzweil reader that scan books and reads them aloud. It’s a fascinating look at something sighted people tend to take for granted.

47% of Adults Engaged in Literary Reading Last Year

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The National Endowment for the Arts released its annual Public Participation in the Arts report, revealing that 54 percent of adults read books that were not required for work or school last year. Are you surprised?

Beyond that figure, 45 percent of adults read novels or short stories. As you can see by the chart embedded above, electronic media was the dominant medium for art consumption. Check it out:

Adults are included in this category if they did at least one of the following types of reading in the preceding 12 months: Books not required for work or school (54 percent of adults) Literary reading (47 percent of adults). Types of literature may have included: Novels or short stories (45 percent of adults) Poetry (7 percent) Plays (3 percent) … adults’ rates of literary reading (novels or short stories, poetry, and plays) dropped back to 2002 levels (from 50 percent in 2008 to 47 percent in 2012).

What Books Should You Read By Age 30?

What books should you read before turning 30?

Glo surveyed 500 people and its editors to compile a list called “30 books every woman should read by 30.” The list includes titles from fifteen different genre categories.

Some of the books that made the cut include Bossypants by Tina Fey (celebrity memoir), The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot (biography), and Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn (mystery). What titles would you add to this list? Do you think this list also applies to men?

Stories in Memory of 9/11 Victims

As we remember those who died on September 11, 2001, you might want to listen to a few September 11 stories on StoryCorps.

For years, the nonprofit has been collecting stories from the family and friends of 9/11 victims. They also created a series of animations based on 9/11 stories. StoryCorps and NPR teamed up for a longer “We Remember” broadcast as well. Here’s more about the project:

StoryCorps set a goal with the 9/11 Memorial to record at least one remembrance for  each of the nearly 3,000 people killed in the attacks. To date, StoryCorps has memorialized 583 individual victims—almost a fifth of the 2,983 men, women, and children killed on 9/11 and February 26, 1993. StoryCorps is also collecting stories of rescue workers and survivors. In total, StoryCorps has recorded and archived 1,193 September 11th stories.

How to Celebrate Book Lovers Day

Happy Book Lovers Day!

According to Holiday Insights, the holiday is listed on two dates, but a “vast majority of sites list it on August 9th. A smaller number of sites have it recorded on the first Saturday in November.”

How will you celebrate? Below, we’ve created a list of five suggestions. (Photo Credit: brewbooks)

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OED Seeks Early Example of ‘Def’ Usage

The editors of the Oxford English Dictionary have reached out to readers around the globe, seeking an example of “def” used in popular culture before 1981. You can read the current “def” definition at this link.

Do you remember reading or listening to that word before 1981? You could get your find added to the prestigious dictionary. Here’s more from the editors, but you should read the whole fascinating post:

The word def, meaning ‘excellent; outstanding; “cool”’ is one of the earliest and most prominent terms to come to mainstream slang from hip-hop, but its early history is shrouded in confusion. The first clear example recorded in the OED is actually from language writer William Safire … it seems likely that def originated among rap musicians as a variant of death in expressions like to be death on in the sense ‘to be extremely good at’.

Homemade Book Dress Goes Viral

Reader Jorimoo created an entire dress out of book pages, earning more than 86,000 views online for her literary creation.

We’ve embedded her photos above–what do you think? Here’s more from the photo gallery of the dress: “here is the long awaited photos!!! A dress I made entirely from the pages of a book! Modeled here by myself at a readers and writers festival”

If you are looking for more, Google has a massive collection of images called “Dress Made of Books.” (Via Ted Weinstein Lit.)

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