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Year in Review

March 2009: Top Publishing Stories of the Year

200px-Chesley_Sullenberger_honored_crop.jpgMarch 2009 opened with a bang as disgraced governor Rod Blagojevich landed a six-figure book deal. In even darker news, the NEA reported that 6.6 Percent of writers and authors were unemployed. The son of Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes committed suicide.

In better news, Fictionwise announced that they had sold five million eBooks, another milestone for digital readership. A few agents launched #queryfail day on Twitter, publishing bad query excerpts and dishing out pitching advice in 140-character bursts. The SXSW Festival’s “New Think for Old Publishers” panel discussion generated controversy and dialogue online.

Finally, Captain Chesley Sullenberger scored a $3.2 million two-book deal with HarperCollins’ William Morrow imprint following his Hudson River airplane landing.

Welcome to GalleyCat’s annual year-end roundup of publishing headlines. It’s a chance to celebrate our good news and reflect on our bad news after a long, challenging year for the industry. Visit our Year in Review link to read all about what happened to publishing in 2009. Include your favorite headlines in the comments section…

February 2009: Top Publishing Stories of the Year

M.A. Song Photo.jpgFebruary 2009 brought a fake Twitter feed and a major horror author’s endorsement of a digital reader.

Early that month, a Citi Investment Research analyst made headlines by estimating that Amazon.com (AMZN) had sold 500,000 Kindles. Within days, we interviewed novelist Stephen King at the launch of Kindle 2.

The comic book world celebrated at a sold-out NYC Comic-Con, and GalleyCat scored interviews with publishing innovators about their work in comics, videogames, and graphic novels. In addition, an early Twitter book deal was signed and a fake Maya Angelou Twitter feed was exposed.

February also marked one of publishing’s darkest moments, as HarperCollins shuttered the Collins division. Dubbed the “YouTube for print,” Scribd counted 50 million readers. That same month, Publishers Weekly also launched a page collecting contact information from laid-off publishing employees.

Welcome to GalleyCat’s annual year-end roundup of publishing headlines. It’s a chance to celebrate our good news and reflect on our bad news after a long, challenging year for the industry. Visit our Year in Review link to read all about what happened to publishing in 2009. Include your favorite headlines in the comments section…

Top Publishing Stories of the Year: January 2009

obama_portrait_146px.jpgJanuary 2009 dawned with a flurry of layoffs and closures around the industry, but a few happy stories broke that cold month as well. An accidental book trailer for an out-of-print book scored 30 million views on YouTube. The iPhone digital reader Stanza counted one million downloads, making headlines for a scrappy start-up.

There was plenty of sad news. Novelist John Updike passed away. Layoffs rocked Publishers Weekly and Criticas magazine closed. Book World, the Washington Post‘s book supplement, ceased stand-alone print publication. Online, the closure of the Ficlets writing site sent waves through the digital writing community.

Finally, booksellers, writers, and this GalleyCat editor attended the historic inauguration of President Barack Obama.

Welcome to GalleyCat’s annual year-end roundup of publishing headlines. It’s a chance to celebrate our good news and reflect on our bad news after a long, challenging year for the industry. Visit our Year in Review link to read all about what happened to publishing in 2009. Include your favorite headlines in the comments section…

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