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Archives: November 2013

NaNoWriMo Tip # 20: Don’t Be Self-Critical

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is almost over, as writers around the globe try to finish a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our twentieth tip is: Don’t Be Self-Critical. You are almost there, keep writing. Finish the text. Save the criticism for your editing phase, and make sure it is constructive. We gleaned this advice from the Jean V. Naggar Literary Agency’s blog, which includes 44 helpful tips. http://jeanvnaggarliteraryagency.blogspot.com/2013/11/44-nanowrimo-tips-and-tricks-from-24.html

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Freelancing 101 Online Boot Camp

Freelancing 101Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. By the end of this online boot camp you will have a plan for making a profitable career as a freelancer, and the skill set to devote yourself to it. Register now! 

Children’s Book Art Auction is Running Through December 3rd

lizboydShopping for holiday gifts? Maybe you’d like to buy some children’s book art and support a good cause. The Holiday Children’s Book Art Auction, a project that supports free speech for children, is running on eBay through December 3rd. The auction is the online version of an annual auction that takes place at BookExpo America.

Over the next few days, more than 70 pieces of children’s book art are up for auction. The collection includes works from artists: Eric Carle, Chris Raschka, Judy Schachner, Bob Staake, Tom Lichtenheld, and Alexandra Boiger.

The auction is sponsored by American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression (ABFFE), the bookseller’s voice in the fight against censorship, the auction supports the Kids’ Right to Read Project (KRRP) and Banned Books Week.

Who’s More Creative – eReader or Tablet Users: INFOGRAPHIC

Screen Shot 2013-11-27 at 3.28.03 PMCaseable and eBookFriendly.com created an infographic called, “Who’s More Creative – eReader or Tablet Users,” which explores how device owners are personalizing their tech toys.

The graphic explores how eReader and tablet owners customize their devices and change things like the color, the typeface and the alignment of their screens. According to the graphic, 58 percent of eReader owners have customized their device’s covers and 42 percent of tablet owners have done so, for instance.

We’ve embedded the entire infographic after the jump for you to explore further.

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62% of Young Adults in the UK Prefer Print to eBooks: Voxburner

voxThe majority (62 percent) of 16-to-24 year-olds in the UK prefer print books to eBooks, according to a new report from Voxburner.

The report included responses from 1,420 participants who were surveyed them between September 25th and October 18th 2013.

The main reasons that the respondents prefer print are that print books are a good value, and that readers have an emotional connection to books. Fifty-one percent of participants said that they liked to hold the product. Twenty percent said that they are not restricted to a particular device. Ten percent responded that print is easier to share. Six percent said that they can sell a print book when they are done with it.

Interestingly, respondents picked books as the media they most prefer in print. Forty-percent of respondents said that they prefer physical copies of movies,  47 percent prefer print newspapers and magazines to digital, 32 percent prefer CDs to MP3s, and 31 percent of these young people prefer physical video games to digital ones. (Via The Guardian).

A Steampunk Picture Book is On Kickstarter


Ryan Dunlap hopes to raise $6,000 for his steampunk picture book, The Littlest Clockwork. The story follows the friendship of a young boy and a clockwork girl.

The funds will be used to cover costs of self-publishing, printing, and shipping. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

The Littlest Clockwork is a children’s picture book featured in the novel, The Wind Merchant, a steampunk fantasy novel I Kickstarted back in early 2012. In the novel, the children’s book goes by the title The Littlest Elder, which is another name for a Clockwork person in that world.”

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Ken Liu Inks Multi-Book Deal with Simon & Schuster

kenAward-winning writer Ken Liu has landed a multi-book deal with the new imprint at Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing. The first title in The Dandelion Dynasty series, entitled The Chrysanthemum and the Dandelion, will be release in 2015.

Liu revealed in a blog post that the idea for this series came from a desire to retell Chinese historical legends. Executive editor Joe Monti negotiated the deal with Russell Galen of the Scovil Galen Ghosh Literary Agency. Altogether, Monti acquired three books and one short story collection.

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The Hunger Games is Making Archery Popular Among Young Women

hungergames1Katniss Everdeen looks pretty cool operating her bow and arrow in The Hunger Games and young women in the U.S. have taken notice. In fact, Suzanne Collins‘ series is leading to a resurgence in archery among young adults in the U.S., especially among girls.

Membership in USA Archery, the association related to the sport, has doubled over the past two years. NPR has the story:

But Denise Parker, CEO of USA Archery — the governing body for the Olympic sport — says the boom following The Hunger Games original movie in 2012 caught many by surprise. ”We didn’t see that coming,” she says. “We’ve had archery in other movies, but never kind of that whole momentum at one time.”

NaNoWriMo Tip #19: Power Write Through The Holiday Weekend

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is slowly coming to an end, as writers around the globe try to finish a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our nineteenth tip is: Power Write Through The Holiday Weekend. The final days of the month are closing in, but lucky for many there is a long four-day holiday weekend upon us. If you have a day job, chances are that this weekend you’ll have a nice long break from it, a great excuse to finish your novel. That’s 96 hours to get your book done. Take full advantage of this situation and get writing.

Happy ReaderThanks Day!

UnknownWhat are you thankful for this year?

For the third year in a row, Colleen Lindsay from Penguin is urging readers to share their literary thanks at the #ReaderThanks hashtag. The campaign is running on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

 

We’ve collected a few of our favorites below… Read more

Melody Anne’s Advice For Self-Published Authors: ‘Hire an Editor You Can Trust’

melodyanneSelf-published author Melody Anne is speaking at our upcoming Self-Publishing Intensive, a three-week virtual intensive dedicated to publishing your own book.

During her presentation, Anne will be giving advice on how to market and sell your eBook once it is ready for publication. In preparing for the session, we asked her to share a tip for self-published authors. Here is what she said:

By far, my number one piece of advice for self-published authors is to hire an editor that you can trust, who knows what they are doing, is educated and knows the changing rules out there. Who also knows you and your voice and doesn’t try to change that. I have 2 editors who I absolutely adore, and if either left me now, I would be devastated! That’s how good your editor(s) should be.”

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