InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Dungeons & Dragons Monster Manual Aids Psychologist’s Experiment

Inspired by his 12-year-old son’s advice, University of British Columbia psychologist Alan Kingstone used the beloved Dungeons & Dragons Monster Manual in an experiment.

According to Discover’s Not Exactly Rocket Science blog, the psychologist was studying why people “automatically look where other people are looking,” trying to figure out if we automatically follow other people’s eyes or if we orient on the middle of people’s faces. The D & D monster manual offered a variety of images to test how we see. Check it out:

He thought it would be easy to discriminate between the two ideas: just use the Monster Manual. This book will be delightfully familiar to a certain brand of geek. It’s the Bible of fictional beasties that accompanied the popular dice-rolling role-playing game Dungeons and Dragons. Regularly updated, it bursts with great visuals and bizarrely detailed accounts of unnatural history. It has differently coloured dragons, undead, beholders … Levy knew that the Manual contained many nightmarish monsters whose eyes are not on their faces. If people still looked at the eyes of these creatures, it would answer the question.

You can learn what the psychologist discovered at this link. His son even earned a byline on the official report. (Via mr_dude_guy)

Mediabistro Course

Fashion Writing

Fashion WritingStarting September 23, work with the contributing editor at ELLE.com to get your writing published in fashion magazines and websites! In this course, you'll learn how to write fashion headlines, runway reviews, and fashion features, write compelling pitch letters, and gain insight into the fashion industry. Register now!