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Posts Tagged ‘Barnes & Noble’

Who Could See Your eReader Information?

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has released a series of charts comparing privacy policies on various e-reading devices.

They asked an important question and found some unexpected answers: With whom can they share the information collected in non-aggregated form? As you can see by the chart above, Google, Barnes & Noble, Amazon and Sony could all potentially share information with law enforcement officials or civil litigants.

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Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace Is Currently $4 on Amazon, B&N and iTunes

AmazonBarnes & Noble and Apple are running $4 sale on David Foster Wallace‘s masterpiece, Infinite Jest.

As of this 5:23 p.m. ET writing, the same book currently costs $8.89 on Google Play and $9.99 on Kobo. This week, Hachette dropped the agency model for eBook pricing, allowing digital book marketplaces to price books as they wish. Will we see eBook price wars without these price restrictions?

paidContent has more about the new eBook contracts: “Hachette’s new contracts with ebook retailers following the publisher’s September settlement with the Department of Justice are now place. As of Tuesday, Amazon had begun discounting some Hachette ebooks slightly; today, the discounts are larger, and Google and Barnes & Noble is discounting as well. Apple is not discounting the ebooks yet.” (link via ohhaiworld)

Barnes & Noble Has Credit Card Breach In Stores

Barnes & Noble has been attacked by hackers and the PIN pads in 63 of its stores have been compromised. In response, the book retailer has discontinued the use of PIN pads in all of its stores nationwide. The company is recommending that customers who shopped in the affected stores in September should change the PINs on their ATM cards and check their credit card  statements for any suspicious charges. (Follow this link for a list of the stores affected).

The New York Times broke the news last night. Check it out: “The company discovered around Sept. 14 that the information had been stolen but kept the matter quiet at the Justice Department’s request so the F.B.I. could determine who was behind the attacks, according to these people.”

Barnes & Noble said in a press release that its customer database is secure and that Barnes & Noble.com, Nook and Nook mobile apps were unaffected.

B&N To Release Exclusive Music CDs

Barnes & Noble, in conjunction with bigHelium Records, announced the launch of its exclusive new CD collection, SundayMusic (R), “designed to introduce sophisticated adults to sophisticated music from unique artists that might otherwise go undiscovered.” The first two albums of the series features artists including Norah Jones, Jeff Buckley, Sara Tavares and Jacob Golden. Steve Riggio, chief executive officer of Barnes & Noble, said, “Though embracing many genres and styles, the SundayMusic (R) compilations have one consistent voice, carried by some of the best singers and writers in the world, comprising the perfect soundtrack for a quiet day.”

B&N Settles Stock Option Lawsuits

Reuters reports that Barnes & Noble agreed to pay $2.75 million to settle shareholder lawsuits alleging the book retailer improperly dated certain stock option grants.

According to the settlement, which covers all shareholder suits pending in state and federal court, Barnes & Noble has agreed to institute certain corporate governance and internal control measures and pay plaintiffs’ counsels’ fees and expenses, but has not admitted any liability.

10 Months In, A Tepid Response to the Sony Reader

The Sony Reader may have arrived with serious splash ten months ago, but as Business Week reports, reviews of the tiny handheld book-reading device have been tepid at best, and Sony has consistently declined to release sales figures, which just might tell you something. Many users say they are unhappy with the interface (too many buttons and not intuitive) and complain that books for the Reader can only be purchased at Sony’s online service, Connect. Less than a tenth of the titles on the shelves of your average Barnes & Noble or Borders are available at Connect. Lisa Phillips, a vice-president at Random House Direct who received her Sony Reader as a gift last December, is turned off by Sony’s closed system. “An open format where you could go to different places and not just use their system would be helpful,” she says.

So Sony has decided to roll out with a few bells and whistles, especially on the marketing front. The price has been cut by $50 and Sony is offering new buyers, who are also registered Connect users, credit for 100 free classic titles, such as GREAT EXPECTATIONS and MOBY DICK. “In terms of timing, with people going back to school, there is a lot of interest in classic literature,” said Jim Malcolm, director of marketing for Sony Electronics. “It gives people an incentive to buy.” They also plan a more targeted approach to travelers instead of the broad-based campaigns of old. But will it work? With Amazon fast approaching with its own reader, Kindle, Sony might be left behind – or the battle for e-book readers’ eyeballs may rage for quite some time…

Could a Borders-B&N Merger Be Possible?

On face value the idea seems ludicrous, but after reading this piece in the Detroit News by Nathan Hurst, there is some reasoning to the possibility that Barnes & Noble and Borders could one day merge with each other. That is because last week, a federal court ruled that a combination of the nation’s largest organic grocers, Whole Foods and Wild Oats Markets, didn’t violate antitrust rules. U.S. regulators had argued that the merger could reduce competition and inflate prices for organic grocery shoppers. That deal closely mirrors a potential deal between Borders and Barnes & Noble and “could be perceived as a potential new precedent and open up meaningful discussions,” David Schick, an analyst at Stifel Nicolaus & Co. in New York, wrote in a report to investors earlier this week.

The talk of a potential merger of Borders and Barnes & Noble comes as both firms struggle against online rivals such as Amazon.com and big-box retailers such as Target. Online stores often offer lower prices, and big-box stores are offering a much wider selection than they have in the past. Those struggles have led many industry analysts to speculate that by combining forces, the two companies might be able to better tackle the competition. Whether this happens remains in question, but it’s certainly not impossible…

How Tana French Hit the Bestseller List 3 Months Later Than Expected

In these fractious publishing times, normally publishers espouse the belief that if a book doesn’t hit the list within at least the first two weeks of its initial publication, it never will. It’s not an absolute, of course – nothing is – but more and more, publishing resembles the movies in terms of books “opening big” on bestseller lists thanks to pre-orders, co-op and other machinery in place months before publication.

So imagine my surprise at checking the New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list dated September 2nd and seeing Irish crime writer Tana French‘s debut novel IN THE WOODS sneak in just under the wire, landing at #35 on the extended list. The book was published by Viking on May 17. It had, at least to the best of my knowledge, not been given extra co-op nor garnered some major media attention. Could this be a case of pure word-of-mouth, where readers who genuinely liked the book recommended it enthusiastically to their friends in chain-reaction fashion propelled a first novel to the bestseller lists months after its release date?

Yes and no, as French’s editor Kendra Harpster said in an email late yesterday afternoon. ” I do think that word of mouth has played a part here,” she said. “Nearly everyone I mention the book to, even non-publishing people, have heard something about it, which is definitely unusual for a first novel by a non-American.” But Harpster also pointed to a recent mention on NPR by Librarian to the Stars Nancy Pearl and more importantly, to the book’s selection by Barnes & Noble for its Discover New Voices program, which put it into their store promotions beginning early August and running through the end of October. So in the end, media and co-op did play a major role for IN THE WOODS, but that can happen to many books – and still not enough copies will sell to get that “NYT bestseller” tag.

B&N Earnings Preview

Barnes & Noble reports earnings for the fiscal second quarter on Thursday, and Forbes has a preview of what’s on tap. The company expects profit to range between 8 cents and 12 cents per share. The company has said it will incur expenses totaling 3 cents per share in the second and third quarters related to an adjusted store opening and closing schedule. Barnes & Noble expects same-store sales at bookstores to increase in the low- to mid-single digits, reflecting additional volume from HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS.

Deutsche Bank analyst Dave Weiner said brick-and-mortar book industry fundamentals are risky. He agrees that Harry Potter sales were clearly “extraordinary,” but expects gross margin to decline about 1.8 percent due to Harry Potter and other discounting. He maintained his “Hold” rating on the stock in a note to investors Tuesday and lowered his price target by $3 to $37.

LongPen To Debut in Bookstores

After limited success with Margaret Atwood‘s device at the Edinburgh Book Festival – enabling Norman Mailer and Alice Munro to make “appearances” – the book-tour substitute device will make its debut into a record store and several bookstores in Canada, the United States and England for a trial run that could bring fans and their idols closer together. The London Free Press reports that kiosks will be set up at the World’s Biggest Bookstore and HMV‘s flagship record store in Toronto, Barnes & Noble in New York and Waterstone’s in London beginning after Labour Day, and could expand elsewhere if successful.

Spokesperson Bruce Walsh says shops with a LongPen kiosk could soon become hubs for celebrity sightings of a new kind. “You could potentially see the talent in their dressing room, somewhere, and they could actually sign into a bookstore,” says Walsh. “It doesn’t really matter, if there’s a kiosk set up, you can sign all kinds of different kinds of talent into wherever the kiosk happens to be.” But tech observer Richard Worzel of Toronto was skeptical the device — with a fee of roughly $2,000 in Canada and the U.S. and $4,000 in England — would be worth it to a publisher promoting a new artist. “Something like this, you’d have to show quite a lot of demand,” said Worzel.

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