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Posts Tagged ‘Bob Woodward’

Michael Chabon, Bob Woodward & Ellen Hopkins Debut on the Indie Bestseller List

We’ve collected the books debuting on Indiebound’s Indie Bestseller List for the week ending September 16, 2012. Reported by independent booksellers around the country, the list gives you a peek at the books everybody will be talking about next month.

(Debuted at #2 in Hardcover Fiction) Telegraph Avenue by Michael Chabon: “When ex–NFL quarterback Gibson Goode, the fifth-richest black man in America, announces plans to build his latest Dogpile megastore on a nearby stretch of Telegraph Avenue, Nat and Archy fear it means certain doom for their vulnerable little enterprise.” (September 2012)

(Debuted at #2 in Hardcover Nonfiction) The Price of Politics by Bob Woodward: “The Price of Politics chronicles the inside story of how President Obama and the U.S. Congress tried, and failed, to restore the American economy and set it on a course to fiscal stability. It spans the three and a half tumultuous years beginning just before Obama’s inauguration in early 2009 and lasting through the summer of 2012.” (September 2012)

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Bob Woodward to Publish The Price of Politics September 11

Journalist Bob Woodward has revealed the subject and release date for his 17th book.

The Price of Politics will be published September 11, a $30 hardcover and a $14.99 eBook. Interviews with Diane Sawyer and George Stephanopoulos have already been planned  The Washington Post will run the first excerpt. Here’s more about the book:

Based on 18 months of reporting, Woodward’s 17th book is an intimate, documented examination of how President Obama and the highest profile Republican and Democratic leaders in the United States Congress attempted to restore the American economy and improve the federal government’s fiscal condition over three and one half years.  Drawn from memos, contemporaneous meeting notes, emails and in-depth interviews with the central players, THE PRICE OF POLITICS addresses the key issue of the presidential and congressional campaigns: the condition of the American economy and how and why we got there.  Providing verbatim, day-by-day, even hour-by-hour accounts, the book shows what really happened, what drove the debates, negotiations and struggles that define, and will continue to define, the American future.

Tracey Guest Promoted to VP At Simon & Schuster

Tracey Guest, director of publicity at Simon & Schuster, has been promoted to vice president, director of publicity.

Guest has been with Simon & Schuster since 1998. In her time at the publisher, she has worked on a wide range of books by authors including: Hunter S. Thompson, Bob Woodward, Don Rickles, Mike Birbiglia, Bob Dylan, Paula Deen and Sylvia Nasar. Guest’s most recent publicity campaign was for Jaycee Dugard‘s bestseller, A Stolen Life. Guest began her career at Dutton/Plume in 1991.

In an email, Adam Rothberg, SVP, corporate communications at Simon & Schuster, wrote: “Through it all, Tracey has demonstrated excellent judgment, warmth, spirit, and an ability to make good things happen for our authors in all forms of media.”

Huffington Post Points to ‘Lifted Passages’ in George W. Bush’s Memoir

bushbook.jpgThe Huffington Post has published a long investigative feature by Ryan Grim, comparing similarities between George W. Bush‘s memoir and other works written about his Presidency.

We’ve included two similar passages below, showing similarities HuffPo reporters found between Bush’s memoir and Bob Woodward‘s Bush at War. Other books mentioned in the article included: Robert Draper‘s Dead Certain, Ahmed Rashid‘s The Mess in Afghanistan, and General Tommy FranksAmerican Soldier.

Read the article–what do you think? Here’s more about Woodward similarities: “The Bush White House challenged the accuracy of Bob Woodward’s account of the administration’s march toward war when he turned critical, but Bush relied heavily on those texts.”

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Pakistani Truck Artist Paints Granta Cover

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Today Granta unveiled that gorgeous cover for Granta 112, painted by truck and bus artist Islam Gull from a Bhutta village in Karachi.

Released this fall, the new Pakistan-themed issue will feature work by Daniyal Mueenuddin, Fatima Bhutto, and Lorraine Adams working with Ayesha Nasir.

Here’s more from the journal: ” Gull, born in Peshawar, has been painting since the age of thirteen. Twenty-two years ago he settled in Karachi, where he now teaches his craft to two young apprentices. In addition to trucks and buses, Gull decorates buildings and housewares and has worked for several consulates in Karachi, as well as traveling to Kandahar, Afghanistan to paint trucks there. Commissioned with the assistance of the British Council in Karachi, Gull produced two chipboard panels to be photographed for the magazine’s cover, using the same industrial paints with which he embellishes Pakistani trucks.”

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Bob Woodward Cover Unveiled for Obama’s Wars

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Simon & Schuster has unveiled the cover for journalist Bob Woodward‘s forthcoming book, Obama’s Wars. The 441-page tome will hit shelves on September 27th, Wooward’s 16th book.

Here’s more from the release: “Working behind the scenes for 18 months, Woodward has written the most intimate and sweeping portrait of Obama making the critical decisions on the Afghanistan War, the secret war in Pakistan and the worldwide fight against terrorism. Drawing on internal memos, classified documents, meeting notes and hundreds of hours of interviews with most of the key players, including the president, Woodward offers an original, you-are-there account of Obama and his team in this time of turmoil and uncertainty.”

The cover image is embedded above. In addition, The Washington Post will publish excerpts from the book on the week of publication.

Bob Woodward on All the New President’s Men

bwcolor-highres.jpgOver at Politico, journalist Michael Calderone examined three forthcoming books about President Barack Obama. Along the way, he filed a progress report about Bob Woodward‘s new book–which is reportedly is “coming out this year.”

Woodward, one half of the investigative duo that cracked the Watergate scandal wide open, spoke about his new project and his old methods. While his unnamed sources have raised eyebrows in some circles, the co-author of “All the President’s Men” stuck by his journalistic record.

Here’s an excerpt: “Woodward balks at the idea that he was simply ‘recreating’ scenes in his books. ‘It’s reported,’ he said. ‘So-and-so was there and they said this. There are meeting notes and so forth.’ His new book, which he said is ‘going very well,’ will use the same methods, and a White House official confirmed that Woodward is getting access to senior officials and will likely sit down with the president.”

Publicist Explains Book Embargoes

9780743274067.jpgBook publicists around the world cringed when the NY Times broke Hachette Book Group’s embargoes on Ted Kennedy‘s memoir last week. The company was so flustered by the break, that they hired a private detective to follow the trail of the leak.

In a new web essay, publicist Yen Cheong explained the logic behind embargoes and outlined the delicate procedures book publicists follow to keep embargoes intact in this difficult publishing environment. Cheong also explores the history of the book embargo, which some think began with Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward‘s 1976 book “The Final Days.”

Here’s more from the post: “In a world in which media outlets are all fighting to survive (and publishing houses are jockeying for shrinking book coverage), it’s not unexpected that access to a hot commodity would be limited. Enter the embargoed book. For book publicists working on embargoed titles, planning publicity campaigns and scheduling interviews becomes an intricate dance in which one false–if unintended–step can torpedo the relationships we work for years to build.”

Do You Think Simon & Schuster Really Cares If Paul Begala Hates Its #1 Bestseller?

obama-nation-cover.jpgActually, the question Leon Neyakh posed in yesterday’s Observer “Media Mob” blog was “Will Simon & Schuster have to answer for [Jerome] Corsi?” But it amounts to the same thing: Neyfakh picks up on a Ben Smith Politico post about how S&S “doesn’t seem to have suffered any collateral damage, or provoked public complaints from any of its prominent liberal authors,” after the publication of Corsi’s Obama Nation. So Smith chases down some of those “prominent liberal authors” and puts them on the spot—and, lo, Paul Begala, who’s publishing Third Term: Why George W. Bush ♥ John McCain with S&S next month, emails back that “Corsi deserves a thorough de-lousing.”

Of course, criticizing an author is nowhere near the same thing as criticizing his publisher, which you’ll notice Begala didn’t do—and, no, “I can assure you the folks at Threshold have had nothing to do with my upcoming book” doesn’t count. (Nor does having a spokesperson field Smith’s inquiries, which is how Hillary Clinton evaded the issue, especially when all it produces is a variant on Begala’s line.)

Neyfakh promises “more on this later in the week,” but we can spare you the anxiety: No serious liberal who has recently been paid, is currently being paid, or thinks he or she has halfway decent odds of being paid good money from Simon & Schuster is going to say anything genuinely negative about the company or anybody who works there except possibly Corsi’s editor, Mary Matalin. And that goes double for anybody who has Bob Barnett arranging their book deals. “Oh, that’s not my Simon & Schuster” is as harsh as it’s going to get, and Smith and Neyfakh will give this up by Friday at the latest to dedicate themselves to trying to peek inside Bob Woodward‘s book before the laydown date. If they haven’t already.

Halberstam Selected As Next Out of the Book Author

Powell’s has made their choice for the next “Out of the Book” film after debuting the concept with Ian McEwan‘s ON CHESIL BEACH. This time, they will debut a film based on David Halberstam‘s THE COLDEST WINTER: AMERICA AND THE KOREAN WAR, published by Hyperion on September 25. The 28-minute film will be produced by series creator Dave Weich of Powell’s Books. The director is once again Doug Biro of Hudson River Films.

Shelf Awareness further reports that the movie will premier on November 11, when McNally-Robinson shows it at Two Boots Pioneer Theater. Between November 12 and December 15, the film will be shown across the country at events hosted by 75 independent booksellers that, as with the Ian McEwan film (shown by 54 booksellers), will include panel discussions, live music, special guests – the latter part especially important in light of Halberstam’s recent passing. The film will rely on some of Halberstam’s friends and feature commentary from Joan Didion, Seymour Hersh, Robert Caro and Bob Woodward.