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Posts Tagged ‘Calvin Trillin’

Elizabeth Gilbert & Barbara Shoup Get Booked

Elizabeth GilbertHere are some literary events to pencil in your calendar this week.

To get your event posted on our calendar, visit our Facebook Your Literary Event page. Please post your event at least one week prior to its date.

The Sexy Librarian will headline a reading event for the Big Book of Erotica story collection. Hear her on Thursday, September 4th at the Good Vibrations Store (Polk Street branch) from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. (San Francisco, CA)

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2013 Thurber Prize Finalists Announced

Three finalists have been picked for 2013 Thurber Prize for American Humor. The $5,000 prize, named after author James Thurber, honors an “outstanding book of humor writing” for the year.

The finalists include Dave Barry and Alan Zweibel (Lunatics), Dan Zevin (Dan Gets a Mini-Van), and Shalom Auslander (Hope, A Tragedy). Past winners of this award include David SedarisSteve Hely, and Calvin Trillin. Here’s more from the release:

Now celebrating its 29th year, Thurber House is based in the boyhood home of author, humorist, and New Yorker cartoonist, James Thurber, in Columbus, Ohio. The award is an annual prize and will be presented with the support of the Greater Columbus Arts Council at a ceremony at Carolines on Broadway in New York City on September 30.

Calvin Trillin Wins the 2012 Thurber Prize for American Humor

Calvin Trillin, author of Quite Enough of Calvin Trillin: Forty Years of Funny Stuff, has been named the winner of the 2012 Thurber Prize for American Humor. He won $5,000 in prize money and a crystal plaque.

The announcement was revealed last night at a ceremony held in New York City. This year’s judging panel consisted of former New York Times reporter Ralph Blumenthal, novelist Jennifer Crusie and fiction writer Luanne Rice.

This prize, awarded annually, was established to honor the legacy of humor writer/cartoonist James Thurber. Here’s more from the release: “Trillin, age 76, who became The Nation’s ‘deadline poet’ in 1990, has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1963. He is the author of 20 books including the bestselling About Alice and Obliviously on He Sails. His new book, Dogfight: An Occasionally Interrupted Narrative Poem About the Presidential Campaign, will be published in December.” (Photo Credit: Leslie Miller)

Nate DiMeo, Patricia Marx & Calvin Trillin Named Thurber Prize Finalists

Three finalists have been picked for 2012 Thurber Prize for American Humor, a list that includes two New Yorker writers and TV comedy tie-in book.

The finalists are: Nate DiMeo for Pawnee: The Greatest Town in America, Patricia Marx for Starting from Happy and Calvin Trillin for Quite Enough of Calvin Trillin: Forty Years of Funny Stuff. The $5,000 prize and a commemorative crystal plaque honors the “outstanding book of humor writing” for the year, and is named after author James Thurber.

Here’s more: “The award is an annual prize and will be presented with the support of the Greater Columbus Arts Council at a ceremony at Carolines on Broadway on October 1. The host for the evening will be Randy Cohen, former ‘Ethicist’ columnist for the New York Times Magazine from 1999-2011, and author of the upcoming book, Be Good: How to Navigate the Ethics of Everything.”

Writer Calvin Trillin on New Yorker Job Titles

newyorker23.jpgIn a recent interview, a writer gave a behind-the-scenes look at the work-life at one of the country’s most coveted literary workplaces–dispelling some myths about job titles.

When The New Yorker hired 26-year-old Amelia Lester to serve as managing editor of the prestigious magazine, GalleyCat readers responded passionately. This week the interview series Big Think ran a long interview with New Yorker writer Calvin Trillin about how the office works.

Here’s an excerpt from the video interview: “There didn’t used to be any of those titles, but now there are and I don’t know who that is now, but oh, maybe 10 or 15 years ago it was somebody who was the same age; we called him editor boy, and the managing editor is not like the managing editor of a news magazine who’s in charge of something. He’s actually a sort of traffic cop who makes sure that whatever piece is ready for that issue gets in or something.”

Random House’s Longest-Serving Editor Is Feted

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After reading Dinitia Smith‘s story about Robert Loomis, who’s just turned 80 and has spent a record 50 years as an editor at Random House, I feel very red-faced. Because Korda, Mayhew, Mehta and Gottlieb are names that trip easily off my publishing-wonk tongue, but Loomis? Alas, my industry vocabulary hadn’t included him – until now. But then, he’s an editor of the classic mold, content to stay in the background and let the spotlight shine upon authors such as William Styron, Calvin Trillin, Edmund Morris, Maya Angelou, Shelby Foote, Jonathan Harr and Pete Dexter.

“About 25 years ago, I began to think, ‘I’m a stick in the mud,’” Loomis told an audience of close to a hundred – including many of the authors he helped launch to stardom – in the trustees room of the New York Public Library last week, at a tribute celebrating his 50 years at Random House. “‘Why wasn’t I moving on?’” Why wasn’t he like so many other editors jumping from house to house in search of bigger, better opportunities? Because, simply put, he loved his authors too much, and if one needed years to write a book, he’d wait patiently for the finished product. But as for the retirement question, Loomis is quick to shrug it aside. “It makes people nervous.” He will always be attached to Random House, he said.