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Posts Tagged ‘Clay Shirky’

TED Talks Speakers Recommend Summer Reads

TEDTalksLooking for something good to read this summer?

TED Talks speakers Elizabeth Gilbert, Melinda Gates, Bill Gates, Rashida Jones, Clay ShirkyUzoamaka Maduka, Amanda PalmerStanley McChrystal and Blood Orange have put together their lists of recommended reads.

Check it out: “Summer: the season for cracking open a good book under the shade of a tree. Below, we’ve compiled about 70 stellar book recommendations from members of the TED community. Warning: not all of these books can be classified as beach reads. And we think that is a good thing.”

Mediabistro Course

Food Writing

Food WritingStarting October 8, work with the food features editor at Everyday with Rachel Ray to develop your portfolio! Gabriella Gershenson will teach you how how to write a successful food piece, conceive story ideas, land assignments to get attention from foodies, and build authority in the food writing community. Register now!

Best Book Editors on Twitter

twitterlogo2323.jpgBook editors have had a rough time in recent years–layoffs, uncertain roles, and crazy workloads. To celebrate National Novel Editing Month and help aspiring writers connect with editors, we’ve updated our directory of the Best Book Editors on Twitter (collected below).

This list is not comprehensive, yet. Add your favorite editor (or yourself) to our growing list–because the digital future needs editors and we need to stay connected.

If you are looking for more people to follow, check out our Best Literary Agents on Twitter directory, our Best Book Editors on Twitter list, our Best Book Publicity and Marketing Twitter Feeds directory, our Best eBook News on Twitter list, our Best Library People on Twitter directory, and our Women in Publishing Twitter List.

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Why the Internet Won’t Ruin Literary Culture

wikipediahours.jpgIn a NY Times interview over the weekend, novelist Gary Shteyngart quipped, “I don’t know how to read anymore. I can only read 20 or 30 words at a time before taking out my iPhone and caressing it and snuggling with it.”

His new novel takes place in an unhappy future where the Internet and digital books have destroyed literary culture. At the same time, one Publishers Weekly editor is worried about burnout in a digital world.

To combat all this doom and gloom, we uncovered a remarkable graphic created by author David McCandless to illustrate how much time we waste on television compared to how much time it took for dedicated Internet writers to build Wikipedia–visualizing an awesome statistic from Clay Shirky‘s new book.

The image above is the tip of the iceberg. Follow this link to see the whole, inspiring graphic. Stare at the image for a few minutes. If more authors worked together online instead of spending time watching television, we could write some amazing things.

Emily Gould Is Offering You the Red Pill

emily-gould-headshot.jpgFormer GalleyCat contributing editor Emily Gould has done more this summer than completing the essay collection she sold to Free Press. She’s also got a byline in the latest issue of Technology Review, discussing books about online culture. “Like an expatriate who reads every new novel that’s set in her homeland,” she writes, “I read books about the Internet to remember the time I spent working and living there, to contrast my memories with the authors’ impressions and see how well they hold up.”

Then she sets up a point/counterpoint between classic Walter Benjamin and cutting-edge Clay Shirky over whether today’s digital environment is really serving the good: “Maybe… social-media technologies are creating simulacra of social connection, facsimiles of friendship… moving heedlessly toward a future where the basic human social activities that these new technologies are modeled on—talking, being introduced to new people by friends—are threatened.” Finally, she encourages readers to experiment with dropping out of the social media scene until “until you start to see your world opening back up again.” Sounds tempting, doesn’t it?