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Posts Tagged ‘Dan Brown’

“I Write Like” Program Compares Your Writing to Famous Authors

I write like
Dan Brown

I Write Like by Memoires, Mac journal software. Analyze your writing!

Today the web-based “I Write Like” game distracted the online literary and publishing set. Created by Coding Robots and the journal-writing software Memoires, the program measures your prose against famous writers.

You just cut and paste a sample piece of text to play the game. According to the program, this GalleyCat editor writes like Dan Brown in blog post and Believer stories. However, when writing in the first person, the program compares our writing to Chuck Palahniuk.

Who do you write like? Share your reactions in the comments section–we’d love to get a cross-section of the literary influences in the audience. (Via Edward Champion)

Try to Top the “Most Laudatory Quote Ever Attached to a Book”

endland.jpg.pngToday The Guardian teased a blurb written by Nicole Krauss for David Grossman‘s upcoming novel, To the End of the Land–calling it “possibly the most laudatory quote ever attached to a book.”

Here’s an excerpt from the blurb: “Grossman may be the most gifted writer I’ve ever read; gifted not just because of his imagination, his energy, his originality, but because he has access to the unutterable, because he can look inside a person and discover the unique essence of her humanity.”

In the comments section, the Guardian urged reader to top the quote with even more flowery language. However, readers must write the blurb for Dan Brown‘s bestseller, The Da Vinci Code. Follow this link to join the summer fun.

Malcolm Gladwell, William P. Young, & Dan Brown Top “Most Highlighted Passages of All Time” List on Amazon Kindle

kindlebeta.pngAmazon recently launched a “Popular Highlights” feature that showcases the book passages underlined by Kindle readers–a 21st Century twist on literary quotation.

So far, the list has been dominated by bestselling books: The Shack by William P. Young, Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell, and The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown.

Here’s more about the program: “AmazonKindle also introduces a “Popular Highlights” feature that identifies the passages that are most highlighted by the millions of Kindle customers. We combine the highlights of all Kindle customers and identify the passages with the most highlights. The resulting Popular Highlights help readers to focus on passages that are meaningful to the greatest number of people.”

After the jump, check out the Most Underlined Passage of All Time (at least since Amazon launched the program).

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Large Hadron Collider in Book Reviews

lhc.jpgThis morning the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) broke world records for smashing together elementary particles at high levels of energy–a physics project that has inspired a generation of authors with doomsday scenarios.

That photo (via CERN) shows scientists reacting to the experiment. To celebrate, GalleyCat Reviews rounded up reviews of books that use the Large Hadron Collider as plot device. Most famously, novelist Dan Brown wrote an apocalyptic scenario in Angels and Demons.

Here’s Janet Maslin‘s breathless review: “With ‘Angels and Demons,’ Mr. Brown introduced Robert Langdon, a Harvard professor of art history and religious symbology who is loaded with ‘what his female colleagues referred to as an ‘erudite’ appeal.’ No wonder: the new book finds the enormously likable Langdon pondering antimatter, the big-bang theory, the cult of the Illuminati and a threat to the Vatican, among other things.”

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Digital Reorganization at Random House, Inc., Part Two

RH_Logo_Sm.jpgAs we noted earlier this afternoon, Random House, Inc. announced some sweeping adjustments in digital responsibilities at the conglomerate publisher. In a staff memo, Sales, Operations, and Digital president Madeline McIntosh explained the changes and gave some insight into recent projects–returning to Random House leadership after a stint at Amazon.

Among the many changes, V.P. of Online Marketing Pete McCarthy will have expanded responsibilities. The memo praised his department’s “work with Doubleday on the ‘second wave’ campaign for Dan Brown‘s The Lost Symbol [as] an excellent example of the sales magic that can be created by combining corporate technology and analytics expertise with the publisher’s stellar creative campaign.” In addition to his old responsibilities McCarthy will now oversee Christine McNamara in her new role as V.P. of Partnership Development.

Crown Publishing V.P. of Group Sales Director Amanda Close will now serve as V.P. of Digital Sales and Business Development. McIntosh explained why: “she stepped in with great agility when Jaci and I asked her to coordinate the cross-functional team evaluating Apple’s new e-book program.”

Finally, Random House’s V.P. of Digital Matt Shatz will be leaving to serve as Head of Strategic Content Relationships at Nokia.

Read more about the changes here. The full memo follows after the jump.

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GalleyCat Reviews: How Do You Review a Vook?

annerice.pngYesterday we reported that novelist Anne Rice will release her first Vook on March 1st, a digital version of her 1984 vampire story, “The Master of Rampling Gate.” In addition, more Janklow & Nesbit Associates authors will soon follow with their own multimedia Vooks that combine social networking, video, Internet links, and text.

This all raises a crucial question for the book review community. How do you review a Vook? Here are some links to the first round of Vook Reviews. Add your own links and thoughts in the comments section.

First up, unexpected book critic Perez Hilton raved about the new Rice Vook in a post entitled Why Didn’t Stephenie Meyer Get This Memo?: “Anne explained she was excited to see how the technology will bring her over 25 year old story to a new generation … Sounds like it could be a lot of fun for die hard fans, if nothing else. Seriously, Twilighters: how come you guys don’t have cool shiz like this? Wouldn’t you just love a new way to girlishly squeal over a the story you’ve read over 400 times?!

Author Joanna Penn reviewed a Vook version of Embassy by Richard Doetsch on her site: “Having read Dan Brown‘s ‘The Lost Symbol’ last week, I can immediately see the application of these types of video to stories like that. I would have loved to see the Washington architecture as it was described, as well as the actual video that is used as a plot device by Dan Brown. I would also like to buy travel books with these types of video – not just the guides, but travel narratives. I recently reread Inhaling the Mahatma by Christopher Kremmer. I love India and have been myself, but I would love to see what he saw and wrote about. These video clips don’t need to be so ‘professional’ as the ones in the Vook, travel narrative could have raw local footage.”

Our digitally obsessed sibling eBookNewser reviewed Vook’s Sherlock Holmes Experience. Here’s an excerpt: “To the newbee, the videos might offer some useful background, but all the bells and whistles finally distract from the text itself, where the real action still takes place. This app raises a question: do we actually want our books–”e” or otherwise–to do more than display text? Is a product like Vook or the upcoming Blio the end of reading, or the beginning of something else?”

Glue Launches Book Giveaway Program

getglue.pngPassionate about a novel? Your favorite book could win you fame and prizes. Today the “social recommendation network” Glue updated its guru program–now users are ranked (and rewarded) by how often they comment and reply in relationship to a book, movie or album.

The social suggestion site will now reward active users, or “gurus.” Check out Dan Brown‘s The Lost Symbol on Glue to see how it works. Like Wikipedia with prizes, fans are awarded points for interacting with other fans and writing about the Brown’s bestseller. The site is still young, so avid readers still have time to grab a guru spot on the site.

Read more at the site: “Glue Gurus will be eligible to win movie tickets, books and more. We have partnered with Universal Studios, Random House, Hachette, Harper Collins, Willey and others to bring exciting rewards to our Gurus … The competition is based on points, where you get points for Replying to other users. You also get bonus points for being the first to comment, first to reply in a thread and also for joining new threads. You can see your current number of Guru points in the sidebar on each object page.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: Glue is not giving away The Lost Symbol. The book was only used to illustrate the guru program. They are giving away You Are Not a Gadget: A Manifesto.

CoverSpy Keeps NYC Under Literary Surveillance

slicemag.jpgSlice Magazine has dispatched a “team of publishing nerds” to take a digital census of the reading habits of New York City residents.

They collect the results at the CoverSpy Tumblr page. Each post describes the reader, filling a literary voyeur gap left since Seen Reading went on hiatus last October.

The CoverSpies spotted the expected books: “The Lost Symbol, Dan Brown (Older M, 45ish, wire glasses & Hemingway beard, book flat in lap, F train)” and the slightly more unexpected books: “The Sex Lives of Cannibals, J. Maarten Troost (F, 28, long blondish hair, sitting in corner seat, B train).”

The website also features the occasional photo of a Kindle, the book’s identity forever shrouded in digital mystery: “Title Unknown, Author Unknown (F, 37, a well-put-together lady overall w/ Prada purse, exited F at Delancey).”

Finally, the site also prowls for writers: “(Jonathan Lethem, typing, Clover’s in Brooklyn).”

Five New Books Break the College Bestseller List

the_lost_symbol-1.jpgThe Chronicle of Higher Education just released their top ten college bestsellers list, and five new books have grabbed spots on the reading lists of a coveted demographic. Nevertheless, Dan Brown held his coveted spot at the top of the list with “The Lost Symbol.”

The five new books are: Superfreakonomics by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner; Eclipse by Stephenie Meyer, Precious by Sapphire; What the Dog Saw: And Other Adventures by Malcolm Gladwell; and The Gathering Storm by Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson.

Here’s more about the list, drawn from a long list of college bookstores around the country: “Reports, which include data provided by Barnes & Noble and the Follett Higher Education Group, are for sales of hardcover and paperback trade books in November.” (Via Ron Charles)

How Did Publishing Survive the Great Depression?

z9199a.jpgMany are asking: How will publishing survive this recession? But maybe we should be asking something else: How did publishing survive the Great Depression?

Digital book blogger Mike Cane aggregated a stream of Great Depression research, highlighting some innovative solutions uncovered by publishers during the nation’s worst economic disaster. He quoted one article about The Book League of America: “The famous Board of Editors select[ed] for you 2 books each month: the best new book -AND- one of the greatest classics. The Book League of America supplies[d] these 2 books each month at 1/3 of the usual cost!” Cane wrote: “People were wailing over Dan Brown going for half-off. These were going for 66% off!”

This GalleyCat editor has been obsessed with the topic as well, studying how writers survived the Great Depression and uncovering more about Depression-era publishing.

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