InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘Dave Eggers’

Where the Wild Things Ended Up at the Box Office

wildthingsare.jpgAs the Dave Eggers-scripted adaptation of Where the Wild Things Are hit theaters recently, blockbuster-watchers have been comparing the film’s ticket sales to other adaptations of classic books.

The adaptation of Maurice Sendak‘s beloved storybook provides an interesting look at the relative success of other literary adaptations for young readers. Here’s Box Office Mojo‘s report on the film’s first week at the box office: “While Where the Wild Things Are wasn’t earth-shattering, it clawed its way into the top tier among debuts for children’s book adaptations that aren’t Harry Potter and was mightier than Bridge to Terabithia, Jumanji and other comparable titles.”

One week later, Box Office Mojo noted the film’s 57 percent drop at the box office, knocked down the indie horror flick, Paranormal Activity: “Wild Things rustled up $14 million, lifting its total to $53.6 million in ten days, but its drop was much steeper than Bridge to Terabithia and other similar titles.”

McSweeney’s Launches iPhone App

iPhonePreview.jpgMcSweeney’s, the Dave Eggers-founded publishing outfit, has entered the smartphone age with a brand new iPhone and iPod Touch app that sells for $5.99 in the Apple App store. What do you think–in a world of free literary iPhone applications (from IndieBound to Stanza, will readers pay for mobile content?

UPDATE: Yes they will… GalleyCat reader Tina Pohlman notes that the app has risen to number one on the “Top Paid App” category in the Books section of the Apple App store. According to the release, subscribing to the app will deliver six-months worth of iPhone-exclusive content, along with choice selections from the publisher’s online content site, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. Nevertheless, the unconventional press promised to maintain a focus on “books, paper, and exploring the possibilities and challenges of our physical objects.” Upcoming projects include a prototype newspaper and pentagonal book.

Here’s more from the site: “Small Chair [is] a weekly sampler from all branches of the McSweeney’s family. One week you might receive a story from the upcoming Quarterly, the next week an interview from the Believer, the next a short film from a future Wholphin. Occasionally, it might be a song, an art portfolio, who knows. Early contributors will include Spike Jonze, Wells Tower, Chris Ware, and Jonathan Ames. This material will not be available online and is pretty sure to be good stuff.”

NBF Will Celebrate Gore Vidal and Dave Eggers

nba.jpgThe National Book Foundation (NBF) announced that Gore Vidal will receive the 2009 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters and Dave Eggers will receive the 2009 Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community.

Both awards will be given out at the 60th National Book Awards Ceremony in New York City on November 18, an evening hosted by writer and actor Andy Borowitz. Vidal will be the twentieth author to receive his prestigious award, which was shared by writers like Joan Didion, Norman Mailer, and Toni Morrison.

National Book Foundation executive director Harold Augenbraum had this statement: ““Vidal and Eggers have made a significant impact on the literary culture of the United States, in two very distinct eras. Although one could call both ‘men of letters,’ their approaches to their craft and to their writing and public lives can be described as very distinctive models of the American artiste engagé.” (Editor’s note: The headline of this post has changed.)

Brief History of Authors vs. Critics

Following yesterday’s posts about authors confronting critics on the Internet, Salon.com writer Mary Elizabeth Williams published a fascinating history of the critic-bashing genre.

The story collected of other notable literary feuds from the 21st Century: Dave Eggersemail exchange with a NY Times reporter, Caleb Carr‘s angry words about a Salon review, and Stanley Crouch‘s confrontation with a well-known critic.

Finally, in a follow-up post Williams noted that author Ayelet Waldman had left an angry Twitter post about a recent review she received in The New Yorker: “May Jill Lepore rot in hell. That is all.” GalleyCat grabbed that screenshot from Waldman’s Twitter feed:

tweettweet.jpg

Dave Eggers Completes Nonfiction Book about Hurricane Katrina

3611182842_2abca4623e.jpgDave Eggers made literary headlines once again, breaking the news that his new nonfiction book, “Zeitoun,” will come out next month–a story about how one Muslim-American family experienced Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans.

Eggers discussed the book in a long interview at The Rumpus. In the last week, Eggers has kept the literary news cycle churning: launching a film he co-wrote, penning a new storybook-based novel, and reassuring readers about the future of print.

Here’s more from the interview: “We vet books as thoroughly as anyone, but then when they’re ready to go to press we send them to press. There’s not much of a delay between when they’re ready and when they’re available to readers. For Zeitoun, the gap was about six weeks. We sent it to press in mid-May and it’ll come out in early July, depending on how far from the printer we need to truck the books. The printer’s in Canada, so maybe if you’re in Canada you’ll get it at the end of June.”

Dave Eggers’ 300-Page Storybook Adaptation

51bsPAgjgfL._SL500_AA240_.jpgWhen the live-action adaptation of Maurice Sendak‘s classic storybook, “Where the Wild Things Are,” hits theaters in October, Dave Eggers will release his 300-page loose adaptation of the book.

Eggers co-wrote the film script with director Spike Jonze, and the experience inspired him to write much, much longer. Sendak fans around the Internets have fiercely debated the merits of the live-action film, and this book will undoubtedly stoke flame-wars into a towering inferno.

Here’s more from Amazon: “The Wild Things–based loosely on the storybook by Maurice Sendak and the screenplay cowritten with Spike Jonze–is about the confusions of a boy, Max, making his way in a world he can’t control. His father is gone, his mother is spending time with a younger boyfriend, his sister is becoming a teenager and no longer has interest in him. At the same time, Max finds himself capable of startling acts of wildness: he wears a wolf suit, bites his mom, and can’t always control his outbursts.” (Via Bookslut)

Dave Eggers Sends Soothing Mass Email

7857_eggers_dave.gifAs the Dave Eggers-penned film, “Away We Go” opens this weekend, the publisher and author made good on a promise to email anyone worried about the future of print.

During an Authors Guild event in his honor recently, Eggers offered to send a reassuring email anyone panicked about the future of newspapers, books, and the printed word. It turns out lots and lots of people were worried about the future, so Eggers sent a mass email to these readers.

Book Bench has an excerpt: “To survive, the newspaper, and the physical book, needs to set itself apart from the web. Physical forms of the written word need to offer a clear and different experience. And if they do, we believe, they will survive. Again, this is a time to roar back and assert and celebrate the beauty of the printed page. Give people something to fight for, and they will fight for it. Give something to pay for, and they’ll pay for it.”

Dave Eggers to Reassure Readers Personally about Print

7857_eggers_dave.gifAt an Authors Guild event in his honor, author and publisher Dave Eggers offered to email personally anyone worried about the future of newspapers, books, and the printed word.

Book Bench reported from the party in Tribeca, chatting with Zadie Smith about the print magazine Eggers founded, McSweeney’s. The article reprinted Eggers’ speech and email address so worried readers around the world could send the novelist their fears.

Here’s an excerpt: “I actually have established an e-mail address, deggers@826national.org–if you want to take it down–if you are ever feeling down, if you are ever despairing, if you ever think publishing is dying or print is dying or books are dying or newspapers are dying (the next issue of McSweeney’s will be a newspaper–we’re going to prove that it can make it. It comes out in September). If you ever have any doubt, e-mail me, and I will buck you up and prove to you that you’re wrong.” (Via Gawker)

Where the Wild Things Are Trailer Debuts

wherewild.jpgIf you are having trouble getting started this cloudy morning, then this trailer for Spike Jonze‘s new film, “Where the Wild Things Are,” will undoubtedly help. Embedded copies are hard to find, but you can watch the trailer at this Apple link.

Dave Eggers wrote the script for the live-action adaptation of Maurice Sendak‘s beloved children’s book, and book lovers have debated the merits of the project for months.

What do you think? Is this trailer blasphemy or genius? The film comes out October 16th. (Via Fimoculous)

Eggers Youngest to Win Heinz Foundation Award

Dave Eggers has become the youngest person ever to win one of the annual $250,000 awards from the Heinz Family Foundation, reports the Washington Post’s Bob Thompson. Eggers won for his work with 826Valencia, the nonprofit writing and tutoring center he founded in 2000 for literary issues pertaining to children ages six to eighteen. There are now seven centers around the US, and Eggers said the money would be split evenly among them.

“I think of it as a validation of the work that 826 does,” a grateful Eggers said in an interview. “Dave Eggers is not only an accomplished and versatile man of letters but the protagonist of a real-life story of generosity and inspiration,” said Heinz Family Foundation Chairman Teresa Heinz in a statement announcing the award. Interestingly, the news seems to have been sent around to most major media outlets (not to me, though) in advance with an embargo in effect – a stipulation that got the Literary Saloon’s M.A. Orthofer annoyed. “An embargo requires a contract, a mutual agreement, a quid pro quo — there has to be, to use the technical term, consideration, as the lawyers would have it. In the case of the e-mail we received, there was none. Just a hell of a lot of presumption.”

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>