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Posts Tagged ‘David Foster Wallace’

David Foster Wallace’s The Pale King Is On Our Desk

That’s our new galley copy David Foster Wallace‘s final, unfinished novel (click to enlarge the image). The 547-page book won’t be published until April 15, but we’ll line up a couple Pale King features to get you prepared.

Performing a bit of literary detective work, The Millions spotted the first sentence of the novel in a 2002 literary journal. At the same time, The Rumpus collected links to six different short stories that will live inside the novel, including: “The Compliance Branch” and “Backbone.”

Here’s an excerpt: “We know that David Foster Wallace had been working on The Pale King since 1996. From this we can only speculate on the other stories that have already been published that will be included in TPK … You can read more about possible inclusions over at The Howling Fantods.”

Jonathan Lethem: ‘Brooklyn Is Repulsive with Novelists, It’s Cancerous with Novelists’

In a LA Times profile over the weekend, novelist Jonathan Lethem took a shot at all the novelists living and working in Kings County, declaring:  “Brooklyn is repulsive with novelists, it’s cancerous with novelists.”

What do you think? Can living in a borough packed with writers actually hurt a writer? Or will all the creativity ultimately help a writer develop?

Here’s more from our sibling blog, FishbowlLA: “A lot of people found it odd when Brooklyn novelist Jonathan Lethem decided to uproot last year and head to SoCal to take David Foster Wallace‘s former teaching position at Pomona College. After all, there weren’t too many writers more closely associated with a location than Lethem was with Brooklyn. But in what looks to be a Sunday LA Times story, posted early online, Lethem says the move was much needed, and is working out well.”

Best Book-Based Netflix Movies Online for People Who Hate Valentine’s Day

netflixlogo.pngWe know there are a few readers out there who dread Valentine’s Day. Inspired by eBookNewser’s Top 10 Most Romantic Adaptations list, we’ve created a Best Book-Based Netflix Streaming Movies for People Who Hate Valentine’s Day list.

Below, we’ve picked the best Netflix streaming movies based on literary works full of drama instead of flirtation; obsession instead of romance; and madness instead of love. What is your favorite adaptation to watch when you are fed up with love?

Thousands of Netflix users enjoy the “Watch Instantly” section of the  popular DVD rental website–streaming movies straight to their  computers or televisions. We’ve made Instant Movies for Readers lists for months, including: the best streaming movies based on contemporary lit, the best Netflix instant movies adapted from plays, and the best Netflix streaming movies based on comic books.

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Authors Who Doodled

Flavorpill has collected the doodles of famous authors, including Sylvia Plath, David Foster Wallace, Vladimir Nabokov, Franz Kafka, Samuel Beckett, Allen Ginsberg, Mark Twain, Henry Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, and Jorge Luis Borges.

The drawings ranged from insect portraits to nightmare images. Wallace drew one of the funnier pieces, doodling glasses and fangs on a photo of Cormac McCarthy.

Vonnegut (pictured with his artwork, via) incorporated many of his drawings into his books. He even had his own art gallery exhibitions. What author should illustrate their next book?

David Foster Wallace and His Philosophy Thesis

In December, Columbia University Press will publish David Foster Wallace‘s undergraduate philosophy thesis from Amherst. During his senior year, the aspiring author also finished a 500-page creative writing thesis that became his book, The Broom of the System.

Entitled Fate, Time, and Language: An Essay on Free Will, the new book features an introduction by James Ryerson. In the introduction, Ryerson tells the story of how Wallace completed a massive creative writing thesis and philosophy thesis in a single year.

Here’s an excerpt: “Despite the heavy workload, Wallace managed to produce a first draft of the philosophy thesis well ahead of schedule, before winter break of his senior year, and he finished both theses early, submitting them before spring break. He spent the last month or so of the school year reading other students’ philosophy theses and offering advice … By the end of his tenure at Amherst, Wallace decided to commit himself to fiction, having concluded that, of the two enterprises, it allowed for a fuller expression of himself.”

David Foster Wallace Archive Open for Research

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The David Foster Wallace Archive is now open for research at the Harry Ransom Center. Above, we’ve embedded two annotated pages from David Foster Wallace‘s battered teaching copy of Thomas Harris‘s bestselling novel, The Silence of the Lambs–an image courtesy of the Harry Ransom Center.

Here’s more from the Center: “The collection is made up of 34 boxes and is divided into three main sections: works, personal and career-related materials and copies of works by Don DeLillo. The works section covers the period between 1984 and 2006 and includes material related to Wallace’s novels, short stories, essays and magazine articles. The personal and career materials section covers 1971 through 2008 and includes juvenilia, teaching materials and business correspondence.”

The David Foster Wallace archive at contains 300 books, titles ranging from a well-loved copy of C. S. Lewis’s The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe to a heavily annotated paperback of Stephen King‘s Carrie.

We’ve included a few screen shots below from this enormous collection of well-loved books, courtesy of the Harry Ransom Center.

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David Foster Wallace Footnotes Horatio Alger

joesluck.jpgAs we enter the final week of our World’s Longest Literary Remix contest, submissions are still pouring in–including editor Meryl Gross‘ elegant use of David Foster Wallace‘s effusive footnotes to brighten up a dull patch of a novel. Read her complete submission after the jump.

Gross joined a brave crew of readers in rewriting one page from a Horatio Alger novel for fun and prizes–read his entry after the jump. 150 pre-registered GalleyCat Reviews readers have signed up to rewrite one page of Joe’s Luck: Always Wide Awake (cover pictured, via).

We will publish the remixed text as a free digital book. Each remix contributor will be eligible for a random drawing of special giveaway prizes. If you want to participate in the next remix contest, email GalleyCat to get on the list.

Three excellent sponsors have donated prizes: 1-Scribd.com and Blurb.com are donating 10 printed copies of the completely remixed novel, using the company’s new print-on-demand service.

2- The remixing experts at Quirk Books will give one lucky winner an assortment of Quirk Classics books, posters, and audiobooks–a prize package worth over $100.

3-The multimedia literary journal Electric Literature will donate “Electric Literature: Year One”–a complete set of the first four issues of the journal–a $40 value.

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Best Netflix Streaming Movies for Readers: Dramas Based on Contemporary Literature

netflixlogo.pngThousands of Netflix users enjoy the “Watch Instantly” section of the popular DVD rental website–streaming movies straight to their computers or televisions. Still, it can be difficult to find the perfect movie amid the overwhelming selection.

To help literary minded movie fans with Netflix accounts surf through the overwhelming selection, here are our ten favorite Dramas Based on Contemporary Literature from the “Watch Instantly” section of Netflix. We also made a list of the ten best plays adapted into films that you can watch instantly on Netflix. Add your favorites from the Dramas Based on Contemporary Literature in the comments–we’ll do more lists for other adaptation categories soon.

Starting Out in the Evening: This Brian Morton novel adaptation stars the brilliant Frank Langella

Devil in a Blue Dress: Denzel Washington stars in this smoking adaptation of Walter Mosley‘s novel.

Iris: A critically-acclaimed adaptation of John Bayley‘s memoir about author Iris Murdoch.

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N+1 Editor Scores $650,000 for First Novel

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Bloomberg News has a long profile up about Chad Harbach, an n+1 editor who recently auctioned his first novel to Little, Brown for $650,000.

Little, Brown was not the highest bidder for the book, but Harbach went with it because he wanted to work with Michael Pietsch, who edited David Foster Wallace‘s Infinite Jest. Harbach, a Harvard grad with an MFA from the University of Virginia, doesn’t get paid to be executive editor of the Brooklyn-based literary magazine, so he lives in a three-bedroom in Brooklyn and scrapes together rent with part-time copy-editing jobs.

This paragraph is fun: “Of the five n+1 founders, Harbach is the third to publish a novel. Benjamin Kunkel‘s Indecision, sold 48,000 copies, according to Nielsen BookScan, which covers about 75 percent of U.S. retail sales. All the Sad Young Literary Men, by Keith Gessen, sold 7,000 copies.”

Harbach’s novel, tentatively titled The Art of Fielding, is nearly 500 pages and focuses on a baseball team at a fictional college in Wisconsin. It’s expected out in late 2011.

Enhanced eBook Edition of David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest Coming

9780316073851_154X233.jpgEnhanced eBooks have been the talk of the town this week–from SXSW to bestselling novelists. Over at Daily Finance, Hachette revealed a few new projects to create digital books with fancy new features, including a “NASCAR-oriented app” and “a synchronized text/audio edition” of Echo Park by Michael Connelly.

Even better, they plan to offer “standalone app” version of David Foster Wallace‘s sprawling novel, Infinite Jest. Out of all the writers slated for an enhanced edition, Wallace’s work could be perfect–with plenty of footnotes, inter-textual references, and endless cultural allusions.

What would you like to see in this app? Here’s more from Maja Thomas, senior VP of Hachette digital–quoted in the article: “We thought, wouldn’t it be great if, when a footnote appears, there’s a symbol in the e-version of the text, and if you tap on it, you can go right to the footnote, and then tap back into the text at any time.”

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