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Posts Tagged ‘Deborah Eisenberg’

Deborah Eisenberg Wins PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction

Deborah Eisenberg has won the 2011 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction. Below, we’ve created a literary mixtape linking to free samples of all five novels nominated for the prize.

The release has more information about the award: “The winner, who will receive $15,000, will be announced on March 15; the four finalists will receive $5,000 each.”

If you want more books, we made similar mixtapes linking to free samples of 2011 Edgar Awards finalists, the 2011 ALA Youth Media Awards winners, the 2011 Book Critics Circle Awards finalists, the Best Translated Books Longlist, the Believer Book Awards shortlist, and the Best Books of 2010.

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MacArthur Foundation to Announce $500,000 “Genius Grant” Winners

DANTICAT-PROFILE.JPGToday the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation celebrates 24 creative individuals who will receive one of the Foundation’s annual $500,000 awards–the famous “genius grants.”

Three writers were included among the winners: author Edwidge Danticat (pictured), short-story writer Deborah Eisenberg, and poet Heather McHugh.

Here’s more from Danticat, from a NY Times article: “It felt incredibly, wonderfully surreal … What artists crave and need most is time. It will definitely buy some time. It’s wonderful to have a sense of security, especially in these economic times.” (Via Publishers Weekly)

Scene @ the American Academy of Arts and Letters Annual Ceremonial

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What do Joan Acocella, Paul Auster, David Markson, Don DeLillo, John Updike, William Vollmann, Deborah Eisenberg, Stephen Sondheim, Reynolds Price, Richard Ford, Garrison Keillor, Jim Harrison, Mary Gordon, John Corigliano and many, many more luminaries in the literary, artistic and music worlds have in common? They all sat on the stage at the American Academy of Arts & Letters‘ Annual Ceremonial, held in the organization’s Harlem-area auditorium to honor the best and brightest in the arts. Some, like Gold Medal for Fiction winner Updike, have been members for nearly half a century; others, like Dana Spiotta, Junot Diaz, Tony D’Souza and Adam Rapp, received generous monetary awards honoring their recent writing-related outputs.

It may just be my own biased viewpoint that makes me think the Academy is a well-kept secret within the current state of the arts community, but then, it might not: while the turnout was strong, it was decidedly bereft of publishing professionals and those under the age of 35. And Academy President Ezra Laderman‘s opening remarks, highlighting how “we’re in an extraordinary time for the arts” thanks to questions about intellectual property, the decline of a proper arts curricula in any American school and eschewing artistic endeavors for market forces, had just the barest whiff of the old school. And yet it was remarkably clear how much the Academy, and its members, care about the arts and about ensuring that promising writers and artists continue the non-profit’s legacy, and how old school values produce a certain dignity that’s easy to admire. One need only listen to Updike’s spare remarks about how his induction into the Academy as its then-youngest member helped further his career by exposing him to peers as well as “magi-like writers” whom he revered. Bestowing awards onto Diaz and Spiotta is a step to the future, and I look with interest to see which younger writers the Academy recognizes from here on in.

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Roth Wins PEN/Faulkner Again

The Washington Post’s Bob Thompson reports that The PEN/Faulkner Foundation will announce today that Philip Roth has won its 2007 award for fiction for his novel EVERYMAN — making Roth the first writer to receive the award three times. He won in 1994 for OPERATION SHYLOCK and in 2001 for THE HUMAN STAIN. “I’m delighted,” he said in a telephone interview with Thompson. The PEN/Faulkner is a gratifying award, he said, because over the years “there just seems to be a consistency to the quality of the winners.” Other finalists for the award included Amy Hempel, Edward P. Jones, Charles D’Ambrosio and Deborah Eisenberg – all for short story collections.