FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘Deborah Rodriguez’

Kathy L. Patrick & Random House Launch Online Book Club Show

The producers of Dancing with the Stars haven’t cast season 12 yet, but we hope they consider our petitions for Kathy L. Patrick and Claire Cook. In the meantime, fans can watch Patrick’s new online book club show with Random House.

Random House marketing director Avideh Bashirrad explained in the release: “We’ve seen increased demand for digital content from book clubs, so we developed a program that would offer them more of what they love. Kathy Patrick was our ideal choice for the partnership since she has been an advocate of our books for many years.”

The first two shows aired on January 14th with Karen Abbott‘s American Rose and Paula McLain‘s The Paris Wife. Patrick founded the Pulpwood Queens Book Club, a group with 400 chapters across the country. Other authors who will appear on the new show include: Pat Conroy, Fannie Flagg, Helen Simonson, Deborah Rodriguez, Frank Delaney, Yann Martel, Janelle Brown, Melanie Benjamin, Susan Vreeland, and Lisa See. (Via Shelf Awareness)

EDITOR’S NOTE: We corrected a spelling error in this post.

Mediabistro Course

Memoir Writing

Memoir WritingStarting January 7, work with a published memoir writer to tell and sell the story of your life! In this course, Wendy Dale will teach you how to create your story around a marketable premise, hone your narrative voice, write a memoir with a solid structure, and sell your memoir before you've even finished writing it. Register now!

Another Day, Another Possible Fake Memoir

Just when we thought the whole “fake memoir” craze from last year had completely abated, along comes the New York Times’ Abby Ellin to upset the apple cart once more. The book up for scrutiny is Deborah Rodriguez‘s KABUL BEAUTY SCHOOL, whose tales of hairdressing in the midst of Islamic restrictions and fundamentalism propelled both book and author to bestsellerdom. Problem is, “Crazy Deb,” as Rodriguez refers to herself in the book, has raised the ire of six women who were involved at the founding of the Kabul Beauty School. The women say the book is filled with inaccuracies and inconsistencies. They argue that events did not unfold the way Rodriguez depicts them, and that she exaggerated her role in the formation of the school.

Though Random House notes on the copyright page that some personal, place and organization names have been changed, and some chronological details adjusted, Ellin explains, the women believe that the discrepancies are too vast to call the book a memoir. They even question whether the stories Rodriguez tells about Afghan women – disturbing, heartbreaking tales of abuse – are real. And they object to Rodriguez’s explanation of how she came to be in charge of the school, as she is today. They say that, instead of being its savior, as she represents, she plotted to move the school from the Women’s Ministry to the house she shares with her Afghan/Uzbek husband, Sher (called Sam in the book). And, they said, she did it for personal gain. “She couldn’t have a for-profit business at the ministry,” said Patricia O’Connor (pictured with Shaima Ali and Terri Graguel, left) one of the school’s founders.

So far, this isn’t quite in James Frey territory and everyone involved admits this isn’t a case of outright lying. But once again, we’re faced with the question of how much truth there must be in a memoir with no easy answers – especially as KABUL BEAUTY SCHOOL follows a pattern set in many true-to-life books and psychological accounts that tell stories with names changed and stories melded. Indeed, Richard Pine, a literary agent and partner at InkWell Management, said Rodriguez wasn’t bound by journalistic standards. “Journalists know about fact-checking,” he said. “Beauticians know about hair dye and shampoo.”