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Posts Tagged ‘Garrison Keillor’

Christine Heppermann: ‘Read with inflection and emotion but not affectation.’

Christine HeppermannHappy National Poetry Month! All throughout April, we spoke with poets about working in this digital age. To end our month-long celebration, we interviewed writer Christine Heppermann.

Heppermann (pictured, via) worked as a columnist and reviewer for The Horn Book from 1996 until 2013. In addition to poetry, she also writes nonfiction and fiction for young readers. Check out the highlights from our interview below…

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Mediabistro Course

Women's Magazine Writing

Women's Magazine WritingPitch and publish in women's magazines with the health director of Family Circle! Starting September 30, Lynya Floyd will teach you how to wow editors with stories they want and need for their publications. You'll learn how to workshop pitch letters to endure editors will read them, master the voice and tone of women's magazines, find sources, and connect with other writers in the industry. Register now!

Amy Poehler Named 2014 Honorary Chairperson for World Book Night U.S.

amyGolden Globe-winning comedienne Amy Poehler has been named the 2014 honorary chairperson for World Book Night U.S.

Poehler (pictured, via) gave this statement in the press release: “I grew up loving books. In today’s digital world, it’s more important than ever to know how it feels to have a good book in your hands. I’m thrilled to be part of World Book Night.”

The organizers plan to kick off April 23rd with an author event at the New York Public Library’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building. Some of the writers set to appear include Malcolm Gladwell, Garrison Keillor, and Walter Dean Myers.

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World Book Night Titles Announced for 2014

lwqzpyn7y8q8dmnbh44f-292x300On April 23, 2014, thousands of bibliophiles will give away half million books in the United States to celebrate World Book Night.

Below, we’ve listed the all of the titles that will be given away. To take part in this event, follow this link to learn more details and fill out an application to be a book giver.

Shelf Awareness reports that this year’s selections “includes the first graphic novel, first university press title and first Asian-American authors. As before, one book is in English and Spanish, and two are available in large-print editions. In addition, the 35 titles were an increase from the previous years’ 30, allowing more authors and publishers to be represented.”
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Booksellers Sing Song Reminding Readers To Buy Local

During the holiday season, St. Paul bookstore Common Good Books released a short music video urging readers to shop at their local bookstore instead of Amazon (video embedded above).

Author and A Prairie Home Companion host writer Garrison Keillor founded the bookstore in 2006.

When the bookstore moved to a larger location, Keillor told the Star Tribune why he started the shop: ”I feel like I’m opening a typewriter repair shop, or a store that sells 100 different kinds of carbon paper. But who cares? If you’re an author and you grew up in the stacks of the Anoka Public Library, you owe it to people to try one more time.”

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Rachel Maddow Wins John Steinbeck Award

Author and The Rachel Maddow Show host Rachel Maddow has won the John Steinbeck Award.

Previous recipients included Joan Baez, Bruce Springsteen, Arthur Miller, Studs Terkel and Garrison Keillor. Maddow is the third woman to receive the prestigious award and the first recipient under the age of 40.

Thomas Steinbeck, son of the great John Steinbeck, had this statement in the release: “My father would have adored Rachel Maddow … Listening to Rachel Maddow is like listening to Walter Cronkite. We have that kind of trust in her. When I watch Rachel Maddow, I feel like I’m part of an alliance. I hope she’s in it for the long haul, because we really need her.”

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Garrison Keillor to Celebrate Penguin’s 75th Anniversary: Perhaps Publishing Will Not ‘Slide Into the Sea?’

A few weeks after declaring “book publishing is about to slide into the sea,” author and radio host Garrison Keillor will go for a ride in the Penguin Anniversary-mobile–a Mini-Cooper covered in logos celebrating the publisher’s 75th anniversary.

At BEA last week, GalleyCat caught up with the Penguin Anniversary-mobile, finding out more about the car’s nation-wide tour. Keillor will join the festivities in Minnesota. Watch the video embedded above for more information.
For more BEA coverage, check out our reporting for BEA Day One, BEA Day Two, and BEA Day Three.

Here’s more from Penguin’s site: “It will be appearing at bookstores across the country and bringing some of Penguin’s well-known authors to anniversary parties at bookstores in their hometowns. At each anniversary event, a set of 75 of the most iconic titles from Penguin Books will be donated to a local library or literacy group. Each author will sign the Penguin-mobile as it makes its way across the United States. When the celebration is complete Penguin will auction the car with the proceeds going to a literary nonprofit organization.”

Oh, the People You Meet at BEA Parties

bealog2010.pngYesterday we prowled BEA parties with Garrison Keillor‘s dour “Publishing is about to slide into the sea” pronouncement ringing in our ears.

Our night began at The New York Times‘ literary party where Ryan Chapman discussed upcoming projects and P.E. Logan chatted about book reviews. Carolyn Kellogg pondered the long night ahead of us, Thomas Rogers critiqued Sex and the City 2, and Leslie Koppenhaver cheered Graywolf Press‘ good year. Laura Miller shared her feelings about the Lost finale and Jonathan Lethem suggested we read a certain biography of the late, great Nathanael West.

At the Harper Perennial blogger apprecition party in the historic Algonquin Hotel, we talked with Ron Hogan about his reading series and debated publishing profits with Levi Asher. Jurgen Fauth chatted about Fictionaut while Marcy Dermansky explained her upcoming novel. Kevin Smokler talked about book tours. Susan Henderson showed off her new galley and Robin Slick said her son had joined the rock band Dr. Dog.

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Author Garrison Keillor Sparks Christmas Controversy

1000017469L.jpgIn a curmudgeonly essay, author Garrison Keillor unexpectedly bashed Unitarian and Jewish Christmas song writers.

While ruminating on a Cambridge Unitarian church that rewrote the words to “Silent Night,” the host of A Prairie Home Companion and author of “A Christmas Blizzard” criticized a number public figures. His column featured an odd mix of satire and self-righteousness, and generated some angry responses.

Here’s the controversial quote, from a Baltimore Sun column: “If you don’t believe Jesus was God, OK, go write your own damn “Silent Night” and leave ours alone. This is spiritual piracy and cultural elitism, and we Christians have stood for it long enough. And all those lousy holiday songs by Jewish guys that trash up the malls every year, Rudolph and the chestnuts and the rest of that dreck. Did one of our guys write “Grab your loafers, come along if you wanna, and we’ll blow that shofar for Rosh Hashanah”? No, we didn’t.” (Via Sarah Weinman)

Scene @ the American Academy of Arts and Letters Annual Ceremonial

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What do Joan Acocella, Paul Auster, David Markson, Don DeLillo, John Updike, William Vollmann, Deborah Eisenberg, Stephen Sondheim, Reynolds Price, Richard Ford, Garrison Keillor, Jim Harrison, Mary Gordon, John Corigliano and many, many more luminaries in the literary, artistic and music worlds have in common? They all sat on the stage at the American Academy of Arts & Letters‘ Annual Ceremonial, held in the organization’s Harlem-area auditorium to honor the best and brightest in the arts. Some, like Gold Medal for Fiction winner Updike, have been members for nearly half a century; others, like Dana Spiotta, Junot Diaz, Tony D’Souza and Adam Rapp, received generous monetary awards honoring their recent writing-related outputs.

It may just be my own biased viewpoint that makes me think the Academy is a well-kept secret within the current state of the arts community, but then, it might not: while the turnout was strong, it was decidedly bereft of publishing professionals and those under the age of 35. And Academy President Ezra Laderman‘s opening remarks, highlighting how “we’re in an extraordinary time for the arts” thanks to questions about intellectual property, the decline of a proper arts curricula in any American school and eschewing artistic endeavors for market forces, had just the barest whiff of the old school. And yet it was remarkably clear how much the Academy, and its members, care about the arts and about ensuring that promising writers and artists continue the non-profit’s legacy, and how old school values produce a certain dignity that’s easy to admire. One need only listen to Updike’s spare remarks about how his induction into the Academy as its then-youngest member helped further his career by exposing him to peers as well as “magi-like writers” whom he revered. Bestowing awards onto Diaz and Spiotta is a step to the future, and I look with interest to see which younger writers the Academy recognizes from here on in.

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