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Posts Tagged ‘Garth Risk Hallberg’

900-Page Debut Novel Snags $2 Million

Screen Shot 2013-11-14 at 12.23.28 AMWriter Garth Risk Hallberg, a contributor The New York Times Book Review and The Millions, snagged $2 million for his debut novel City on Fire, a 900-page tome. This is a hefty score for a first time novel.

The New York Times has the scoop:

The book drew an advance that is highly unusual for a debut novel. In a two-day bidding war, 10 publishers bid more than $1 million. Knopf emerged the victor, paying close to $2 million, said two people familiar with the negotiations. Before the acquisition, Diana Miller, an editor at Knopf, wrote Chris Parris-Lamb, Mr. Hallberg’s agent, an email praising the book, saying it was ‘off the charts in its ambition, its powers of observation, its ability to be at once intellectual and emotionally generous.’ Read more

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

Garth Risk Hallberg Offers 7 Ways to Kindle-Proof Your Manuscript

How many books an you read that could never have an eBook edition? Over at The Millions, author Garth Risk Hallberg offered seven ways to “Kindle-proof” your manuscript.

Some of the simpler ways include using color, adding illustrations, and playing with typeface. Ten titles that Hallberg lists which employ these methods include The Original of Laura by Vladimir Nabokov and Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak.

The fourth step recommends that you “run with scissors.” Here’s more from Hallberg’s piece: “The opening story of John Barth‘s Lost in the Funhouse, famously invites readers to take scissors to it and create a Mobius strip. This cut-up aesthetic is more literal in Jonathan Safran Foer‘s Tree of Codes, which slices and dices the pages of Bruno Schulz‘s Street of Crocodiles to create pages like lace. It’s a piece of found prose-poetry whose sentences change as you turn the page. Except on the Kindle, where it doesn’t – and couldn’t – exist.”