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Posts Tagged ‘Henry Miller’

Henry Miller’s 11 Rules For Writing

henrymillerLike many great writers, Henry Miller has his own personal rules to help him adhere to his writing schedule.

Brainpickings.org shared Miller’s list, which includes smart advice like staying focused on the current book and not starting a new book while in the middle of another. In addition, he told himself, ”When you can’t create, you can work.”

We’ve embedded his entire list of rules after the jump. Read more

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Barney Rosset Has Died

The great publisher Barney Rosset has passed away. Rosset bought Grove Press in the 1950s, championing the work of countless writers, including: Henry Miller, Samuel Beckett, Jack Kerouac, Malcolm X, Pablo Neruda, Kenzaburo Oe, Kathy Acker, and David Mamet.

In the 1960s, he launched the provocative magazine, Evergreen Review. In a highly recommended interview at The Paris Review, Rosset shared his first encounter with Miller’s work as a college freshman at Swarthmore:

I read Tropic of Cancer, which I bought at Steloff’s Gotham Book Mart on Forty-seventh Street. Who told me about it, I don’t know, but I liked it enormously and I wrote my freshman English paper about both it and The Air Conditioned Nightmare … After I read Tropic of Cancer, I left—decided to go to Mexico. Because the book had influenced me so much, I left in the middle of the term. But I ran out of money. I never got to Mexico; I got as far as Florida and I came back. Four weeks had gone by. They had reported me missing to the United States government. My family didn’t know where I was. I came back, sort of sadly.

(Via Sarah Weinman)

Henry Miller & Anais Nin Share Dream Diary Advice

In the vintage interview embedded above, the great writers Anais Nin and Henry Miller discuss dreams and the writing life. Miller urged all writers to record their dreams in the morning as a writing exercise.

He explained: “Don’t wake up. Don’t open your eyes all the way. You’ll know you’ve been dreaming when you wake up, close your eyes slowly and you can hold on to that last thread and go back into the labyrinth and trace it back. When you’ve got it all together, get up out of bed, in your pajamas and go right to the typewriter and record it. Not only record that dream, but all the associations that came with it.”

Miller concluded with an inspiring reminder for all writers to live full lives: “being dead while you’re alive, that’s real death.” (Via Biblioklept)

Los Angeles Review of Books Taps YA Authors for Banned Books Week

The Los Angeles Review of Books (LARB) celebrated Banned Books Week with a series of essays by YA authors called “Getting Banned.”

The authors in the Getting Banned essays have all had their work banned or challenged at some point. Follow these links to read essays by Ron Koertge, Ellen Hopkins, Susan Patron, Sonya Sones and Lauren Myracle. LARB‘s YA editor Cecil Castellucci explained: “YA authors are on the front lines of today’s censorship battle.”

The web publication will also publish a two-part essay by English professor Loren Glass about the 1960′s obscenity trials Grove Press faced for publishing William Burroughs‘ Naked Lunch and Henry Miller‘s The Tropic of Cancer. Nickel and Dimed author Barbara Ehrenreich will also publish a Banned Books Week essay on Saturday.

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Spotify Playlists for Writers: Henry Miller

Nobody has ever written about classical music like Henry Miller. If you have a Spotify account, enjoy this two-hour mix we made with inspiring writing music from Miller’s most famous books: Tropic of Cancer, Plexus, Nexus and Black Spring.

Here is Miller writing about Beethoven’s “String Quartet No. 15″ in Black Spring: “I hear again now the music of the A Minor Quartet, the agonized flurries of the strings. There’s a madman inside me and he’s hacking away, hacking and hacking until he strikes the final discord. Pure annihilation, as distinguished from lesser, muddier annihilations. Nothing to be mopped up afterwards. A wheel of light rolling up to the precipice–and over into the bottomless pit. I, Beethoven, I created it! I, Beethoven, I destroy it!”

Follow this link to get a Spotify invite for the free service. Once you have an account, check out our Henry Miller Spotify Playlist and our Haruki Murakami Spotify Playlist. We love making music mixes, so we will create more playlists for writers. If you have more ideas for a particular playlist, you can always add your suggestions in the comments section–we will update our mix.

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Authors Who Doodled

Flavorpill has collected the doodles of famous authors, including Sylvia Plath, David Foster Wallace, Vladimir Nabokov, Franz Kafka, Samuel Beckett, Allen Ginsberg, Mark Twain, Henry Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, and Jorge Luis Borges.

The drawings ranged from insect portraits to nightmare images. Wallace drew one of the funnier pieces, doodling glasses and fangs on a photo of Cormac McCarthy.

Vonnegut (pictured with his artwork, via) incorporated many of his drawings into his books. He even had his own art gallery exhibitions. What author should illustrate their next book?

John Calder Calls It A Day

The Scotsman dubs John Calder the “enfant terrible of Scottish publishing” for good reason, seeing as he published some of the most avant-garde writers in literary history, scandalized the establishment and escaped brushes with the law. But now, at the age of 80, Calder is retiring – and making available his prodigious backlist to the highest bidders. Calder said last week: “I have been at it for 58 years and I can’t keep going forever. Like the family dog, I want to see it go to a good home. The [Samuel] Beckett copyrights will go into other hands.”

He has published some of the best of contemporary British and international dramatists including Steven Berkoff, Marguerite Duras, Eugene Ionesco, Georg Kaiser, David Mercer, Robert Pinget and Heathcote Williams, as well as works by novelists Henry Miller and William Burroughs. He also speaks of modern publishing with some contempt: “When I was young, publishing companies were run by people with editorial knowledge and experience, who could read things and make up their minds on what was good or otherwise. But now, it’s the accountants and marketing people who make the decisions, caring for nothing but money.”