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Posts Tagged ‘Ian Rankin’

Reagan Arthur Named Publisher of Little, Brown

Reagan Arthur, the editorial director of Little, Brown’s Reagan Arthur Books imprint, will be the next publisher and senior VP of Little, Brown. She will assume her new role on April 1st as Michael Pietsch becomes the new CEO of Hachette Book Group.

The release included this news: “In stepping into the role of Publisher, Arthur will retire the Reagan Arthur Books imprint she has led for three years.”

Arthur has worked at Little, Brown since 2001, earning her own imprint in 2008. She has edited Tina Fey, Joshua Ferris, Kate Atkinson, George Pelecanos and Ian Rankin.

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Hachette Continues to Mark European Territory

Continuing its bid to make sure that only its titles are distributed through mainland Europe – and not those pesky American editions – Hachette Livre UK hosted its first ever European Seminar this past week, paying for nearly 40 leading European booksellers and distributors to attend. Publishing News reports that guests stayed at the Savoy on Monday night – where the guest speaker was Ian Rankin – and were taken by boat to the Globe Theatre for the seminar on Tuesday, where divisional presentations were made by Hachette’s UK companies, and Little, Brown CEO Ursula Mackenzie outlined why making Europe exclusive would be to their mutual benefit.

In essence, PN says, Hachette maintains that European booksellers will sell more copies of a single edition of a name author, than the combined sales of a UK and US edition. To help achieve this, it is prepared to provide marketing spend for European campaigns, just as if it was the domestic market, and intends to tour more authors in Europe. Monica Richter of The Bookshop in Zurich welcomed the marketing spend and said that English editions “tend to be more popular, closer to European taste. However, having both editions does give the shop a more international atmosphere which our customers enjoy. And we have to stock both at present because we never know which edition will arrive first.”

Orion Injects Music Into Rebus Marketing Campaign

Orion is running the first ever publisher promotion with music-based social networking site Last.fm as part of its year-long campaign for Ian Rankin‘s final Inspector Rebus novel, reports the Bookseller’s Alison Flood. Orion’s promotion, which begins on August 16th, will see a dedicated area of the site host exclusive Rankin/Rebus top 20 playlists, with a Rankin essay on music, an author video, audio extract and cover image of the as yet untitled book. Banners and ads will drive users to the Rebus area; the page will click through to Amazon for pre-ordering of the novel, which will be published in the UK on September 6th.

“I really wanted to focus on the music aspect of the books as this potentially will be Rebus’ swansong, and I think that there are so many opportunities now to exploit the specific cultural and musical crossovers that are important to Ian’s writing,” said senior marketing manager Claire Brett. “Working with Last.fm will enable us to invert this relationship – we’ll introduce new fans to the books via the music.”

Bertrams and Gardners Target Independent Booksellers

The Bookseller reports that wholesalers Bertrams and Gardners are going head to head this summer with a range of discounts for independent booksellers. Bertrams is launching a “Summer Reading three-for-two” campaign, which is offering indies a 55% discount on selected titles “to enable [them] to mount a profitable and sales-driving three-for-two”. More than 130 titles are included in the offer, which covers fiction, children’s and non-fiction from authors including Ian Rankin, John Grogan, Maeve Binchy and Margaret Forster.

Gardners’ “Summer Reading” campaign, meanwhile, is offering independents 50% discount across fiction, non-fiction and children’s. Approximately 50 titles are included in the promotion. Simon Morley, buying director, said that Gardners would introduce different titles each month until the campaign finishes in August, but more popular titles will remain for the whole campaign.

Winners of the British Book Awards

The Galaxy British Book Awards were handed out at a gala ceremony last night, and the Independent‘s Louise Jury reports on the speeches, the winners and the surprises of the evening (which will be televised at the end of the week.) Highlights included Richard & Judy‘s Best Read of the Year going to Jed Rubenfeld for THE INTERPRETATION OF MURDER, while Ricky Gervais beat established writers including Geraldine McCaughrean and Terry Pratchett to take the children’s book of the year honour with Flanimals of the Deep, the third in the series he has produced with the illustrator Rob Steen. Gervais accepted his award live on stage in Ipswich. “That’s fantastic … it’s the first one for my literary outputs,” he said, admitting his work had been described as “books about bollocks with eyes drawn on them”. Other winners in various categories included Richard Dawkins, Ian Rankin, Peter Kay, Conn & Hal Iggulden and Victoria Hislop.

New York Times nabs Rankin For “Funny Pages”

Once Michael Chabon finishes up his adventure-themed novella for the New York Times Magazine, Ian Rankin will start his own multi-week serial for the paper, the Independent reports, thereby becoming the first non-American to have a specially commissioned work serialised by the Gray Lady. “Since previous “serial providers” have included Patricia Cornwell, Michael Connelly, Elmore Leonard and Michael Chabon, the offer was hard to turn down,” said Rankin, who was approached by the NYT to write the story late last year.

He spent all of January writing the novella at a 2500-word-a-day clip. “It was quite intense but not bad at all,” he said to the Scotsman. “I had the idea and I just ran with it really. It’s hard to try and think about it right now because having sent the copy over to the paper I immediately settled down to the next Rebus novel so now my head is full of him again.” And don’t expect Inspector Rebus, who’ll make his final appearance (unless he makes cameos in future novels, as rumored) in book format later this year, to figure in the story.