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Posts Tagged ‘James Marcus’

James Marcus Named Deputy Editor at Harper’s Magazine

Columbia Journalism Review editor-at-large James Marcus will join Harper’s Magazine as deputy editor next month.  He will report to Harper’s editor Ellen Rosenbush.

Marcus (pictured) has edited at CJR since 2007, editing  the journal’s Ideas + Reviews section. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Nation, The New York Review of Books, and Salon.

He started blogging again earlier this month with this post at House of Mirth: “Just as there is no reason to start blogging, there is no reason to stop. So I’ll get rolling again with two savory snippets. First, an observation: there are moments when the writing life seems like a parade of small degradations. Can any other profession take such a toll on the ego?” (Via MAOrthofer)

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Philip Roth, Techno Star?

roth2.gifFollowing an interview with Philip Roth, the journalist and musician James Marcus created a dance remix sampling the great writer’s “Jewish shouting” and laughter–a song destined to be the ringtone of choice among hip literary types this summer.

MobyLives shared the crazy little tune, recorded while Marcus interviewed Roth about an adaptation of “Portnoy’s Complaint.” The interview became a LA Times feature, but Marcus took the clip home to remix into “The Jewish Shouting Mix 3.”

Here’s an explanation, from the Roth profile: “It’s a movie about shouting. Jewish shouting,” [Roth explained]. (He proceeds to give a brief, comical example, which strikes me as a specimen of literary history, like Thoreau demonstrating how to peel the bark off a birch tree.”