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Posts Tagged ‘Jared Friedman’

Scribd Transitions to HTML5

btn_logo_red_122x44.gifYesterday Scribd announced their full-scale transition from Flash to HTML5. This new programming language will make Scribd content available across a larger swath of mobile devices, especially the iPhone and iPad.

Scribd co-founder Jared Friedman had this statement: “Publishers benefit from HTML5 tremendously … The distribution of their content across the social web and mobile platforms becomes virtually automatic — no technology barriers between them and their readers, no need to build native mobile apps, an ability to easily insert multi-media or advertising into their content. The possibilities are endless.”

With the update, you can now read the April edition of GalleyCat Reviews on your iPhone while shopping for books or browse through the Best Book Reviewers on Twitter list while tweeting on your iPad.

See our complete Scribd page here.

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

Do We Need Three Million Books a Year?

According to JaredFriedman23.jpgScribd CTO Jared Friedman (pictured), the solution to a healthier publishing industry is simple: increase the amount of books available from 300,000 to 3 million.

Over at our sibling blog BayNewser interviewed Friedman, getting his unconventional thoughts about the future of publishing. Scribd has been nicknamed YouTube for books, an online repository of millions of texts–one of the companies included in mediabistro.com’s eBook Summit. The interview covered everything from Harry Potter to e-readers.

What do you think? Here’s an excerpt: “Our thesis is that the limiting factor in the number of books that are published per year is not the amount of content that people are able to write and it’s not the amount of content that people are able to read. Rather it’s a structural limitation of the publishing industry itself…. We think that if we can cast off the artificial limitations that are imposed by the way the economics of the publishing industry currently work, we could potentially dramatically increase the amount of work that is published.”