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Posts Tagged ‘Jay McInerney’

Margaret Atwood and Jay McInerney Deliver Graduation Speeches

Over at the New Yorker, Book Bench has been collecting 2010 commencement speeches delivered by novelists. They link to the complete speeches, but choose the juiciest quotes in specific categories like “Why Writing Is Like Life” and “Requisite Platitude.”

Read the whole post here, but here is a bit of gloomy advice from Jay McInerney: “the last four years might well be, for some time to come, the high-water mark in your early life.”

And here is a moment of “Humility/Coy Self-Promotion” from the great Margaret Atwood : “For who but a warty person–or, to put it in more romantic terms, one who has visited the shadow side–would have written two fun-filled, joke-packed novels about the almost total annihilation of the human race? I didn’t get any literary awards for those.”

(In lieu of an author photo, we’ve included a video of Atwood’s role in Score: A Hockey Musical)

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Rielle Hunter Criticizes Her Literary Image

gqlogo.jpgIn a ten-page interview with GQ, John Edwards‘ mistress Rielle Hunter finally told her side of the story. Interestingly enough, she spends most of her time defending herself against books–a literary review embedded inside a political conversation.

Hunter first commented on her relationship with novelist Jay McInerney during the 1980s, a relationship that inspired a fictional role in his novel Story of My Life. “I love Jay. Jay is a great guy, a lovely man. To date? That time in my life was a nightmare.”

Next she disputed how Edwards’ wife Elizabeth portrayed the discovery of the Hunter affair in her memoir. Here’s Hunter’s story, blaming an unexpected phone call from Elizabeth: “And I answered the phone and said, ‘Hey, baby.’ And, click … And then she confronted him and confronted him, and he finally confessed. He didn’t confess like she claims in her book.”

Next she disputed Edwards aide Andrew Young portrayed her in his memoir: “I’ll say this about Andrew’s book: If his grand-jury testimony matches his book, I would suspect that they will be looking at him for many, many counts of perjury.”

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Bret Easton Ellis’ Twitter Review Career

FM-9-COVER-LR.jpgEver since building his own Twitter page for a New Yorker article, novelist Bret Easton Ellis has made blogging headlines as he used his new platform to review films and records in 140-character bursts.

Most recently, Gawker wrote a long response to the author of “American Psycho” and his review of a recent movie: “The most alienating movie experience of 09: sitting stone-faced in a packed Westwood theater that’s roaring with laughter at The Hangover…”

In contrast, the Village Voice loved his review of Jay McInerney‘s stories and a sports picture: “This weekend reminded: Slap Shot is the funniest sports movie ever made. Bo Burnham-unbearable. The Jayster can really write short stories.”

Dana Vachon Tries on Heir Apparent Mantle

This is surely the week of Dana Vachon, whose combination of blogging and banking experience plus eye popping book deal is now bearing fruit with the release of his debut, MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS, touted as the next heir apparent to Jay McInerney‘s BRIGHT LIGHTS, BIG CITY. The New York Times tracked him as he went out clubbing and also incorporated M&A into a trend piece about Wall Street books. New York Magazine had its own profile of the former J.P. Morgan banker. Now it’s the New York Observer‘s turn, as Lizzy Ratner sits down with the author while he eats a “goddamn good breakfast” in Balthazar.

Explaining how the thinly-vield roman a clef came to be, Vachon said “I felt like I was living with a bunch of people who had wrongly identified themselves as a post-9/11 generation. And I felt like I they were one of the most gilded and privileged groups to ever land into anything, that nobility no longer obliged but sort of entitled. I wanted to set down a portrait of this generation. Period,” he continued. “What’s the great Flaubertian quote? ‘All it takes for a member of the bourgeoisie to be happy is good health, selfishness, and stupidity, but the first two will get you nowhere if you don’t have the third?’” he said, slightly misquoting the author. “I love that.”

The question is how Vachon and his novel – Riverhead‘s “lead fiction title” for the moment according to his editor, Geoff Kloske – will be received. All the usual launch parties and off-the-book features apply, but the feature’s slightly sniffy tone about the book seems to indicate [his] skepticism that Vachon even has another novel in him. But Vachon makes it clear he’s got a tangible idea for book number two: “It’s a book about space tourism, Westchester County, instant unwanted fame and, um, the possibility of a new beginning, maybe? Of renewal? I mean, I feel the book I just wrote is so much about cities built on cities built on cities, and this one is not.”

Although if for whatever reason, Vachon decides not to write books anymore, he can always sing*:

*That’s Vachon singing “Perfect Gentleman” with Wyclef Jean at the Audi Forum in New York City on December 5, 2006.