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Posts Tagged ‘Jennifer Stone’

Harriet the Spy, Random House, Lady Gaga, and Zach Galifianakis: Weekend Reading

RH_Logo_Sm.jpgIt was a wild week for publishing, from the Tools of Change conference to celebrity book trailers to bloggy-updates of classic children’s books.

For your weekend reading pleasure, here are the biggest stories from the week. If you are interested in reading more, check the Weekend Reading archive.

The biggest story of the week was a sweeping executive reorganization at Random House, preparing for the digital future.

Next, actor Zach Galifianakis interviewed novelist John Wray in a topsy-turvy book trailer.

At the Tools of Change conference, we experimented with the Entourage dual-screen eReader and watched the future of the bedtime story.

We published a downloadable, printable, mobile-device readable monthly edition of GalleyCat Reviews.

Read more

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Actress Jennifer Stone Leads Harriet the Spy into “Blog Wars”

In March, the Disney Channel will release Harriet the Spy: Blog Wars starring Jennifer Stone (one of the leads in the Disney Channel’s Wizards of Waverly Place).

It will, for better or for worse, give the beloved children’s book a 21st Century makeover. Watch the trailer above for more details, but here are the basics: Harriet is now a blogger competing with a popular girl at school in “blog war,” armed with a laptop and high-tech surveillance devices.

One YouTube commenter was pretty excited by the trailer: “OMG love the book the 90s movie and will love this!” Another commenter skipped the book altogether: “They should leave Harriet the Spy alone and keep it as an awesome memory that belongs to Nickelodeon.” Finally, one reader added an expletive-laden comment with this bit of criticism: “Harriet the Spy is not about popularity or getting the hot guy. It’s about a girl who wants to become a writer one day so she observes people and writes in her notebook.”

This will undoubtedly spawn The Big Literary Debate of the Week. What do you think? Is this an imaginative improvement or abusive adaptation?