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Posts Tagged ‘John Banville’

John Banville to Revive Raymond Chandler’s Detective

Award winning novelist John Banville will write a new novel about Raymond Chandler‘s beloved private detective, Philip Marlowe. Henry Holt will publish the book in 2013 under Banville’s pen name, Benjamin Black.

Banville promises to create a “slightly surreal, or hyper-real, atmosphere” for the novel, exploring some of Marlowe’s Los Angeles. What do you think of this surprising turn for the novelist?

Here’s more about the title: “Along with Marlowe, Banville will bring back policeman Bernie Olds, the gumshoe’s good friend. The book will have an original plot and take place in the 1940s. The setting will remain in Bay City – Chandler’s fictional stand-in for Santa Monica, California – and feature Chandler’s hallmark noir ambience.”

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Philip Roth on Bad Sex Award Shortlist

roth$philip.gifYesterday the Literary Review announced the shortlist for their annual Bad Sex in Fiction Award; a list that includes a rock star, a Nobel Prize favorite, and of course, Philip Roth.

Roth (photo by Nancy Crampton, via HMH) was nominated for a racy scene in “The Humbling.” Oz, the gamblers’ former favorite for the 2009 Nobel Prize for Literature, was nominated for “Rhyming Life and Death.” Rock star Nick Cave earned his nod for “The Death of Bunny Munro,” and his publisher told the Guardian they were pleased with the shortlist appearance.

Here’s a particularly juicy passage from a previous nominee, “The Whole World Over” by Julia Glass. “And then before her inner eye, a tide of words leaped high and free, a chaotic joy like frothing rapids: truncate, adjudicate, fornicate, frivolous, rivulet, violet, oriole, orifice, conifer, aquifer, allegiance, alacrity … all the words this time not a crowding but a heavenly chain … a release of something deep in the core of her altered brain, words she thought she’d lost for good.”

The complete list is after the jump, via the Guardian

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Dateline LBF: Industry and Blogosphere Reactions

  • Simon Trewin: “After the terrible experiences of the 2006 London Book Fair at ExCel in Docklands where nothing seemed to go right at all it was a joy to return to West London for what many attendees agree was the best fair ever.”
  • Macmillan president Richard Charkin‘s two dispatches are colorful and detail-laden but most notable for the following observation: “. My back-of-an-envelope calculations suggest that the elimination of all trade book fairs (LBF, BEA, Bologna, Delhi, Guadalajara, Tokyo, Cape Town etc) might reduce total industry costs by several billion dollars.” Makes more that “just a boy” think…
  • Ali Karim describes the peculiar sensation of meeting Dean Koontz via the LongPen. Karim also provided the video at the top of this post (along with other video captures of John Banville‘s noir panel.)
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Ed Victor Still the Man in Britain

Keeping up today’s agent theme, the Observer’s Stephanie Merritt profiles Ed Victor, who may be Andrew Wylie‘s mirror twin or at least his equal in terms of longstanding, reputation and dealmaking. But when it comes to society mentions, Victor is the clear, um, victor – a few years ago, he and his wife, Carol, were named second on Tatler’s list of the most invited guests in London, just behind Elton John. “The adjective that has most often accompanied my name in the press is “flamboyant”,” Victor has said, though it can hardly be a complaint.

He may be known for mingling with celebrities and his multimillion dollar deals, Merritt explains, but he does literary substance as well: he represented Iris Murdoch and continues to look after her estate, and recently took on John Banville after his Booker Prize win. “I was surprised that he didn’t do more authors like her, for such a clever man,” says fellow agent David Godwin, “but he chose to concentrate on the popular books. It may be that as an enterprising agent, he felt he could do more to build those kind of authors than for someone like Iris.” And considering how big Victor seems to have scored with the Alastair Campbell diaries most recently, he still feels that way…