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Posts Tagged ‘Jorge Luis Borges’

Gabriel García Márquez Archive Finds a Home at the Harry Ransom Center

GabrielThe Harry Ransom Center, an institution based at the University of Texas at Austin, has acquired the archive of the late Gabriel García Márquez.

The Nobel Prize-winning writer had passed on earlier this year. Some of the items in the García Márquez archive include letters, photo albums, typewriters, computers, scrapbooks, drafts of his 1982 Nobel Prize acceptance speech, and the manuscripts for One Hundred Years of SolitudeLove in the Time of Cholera, and Memories of My Melancholy Whore.

Here’s more from the press release: “Highlights in the archive include multiple drafts of García Márquez’s unpublished novel We’ll See Each Other in August, research for The General in His Labyrinth (1989) and a heavily annotated typescript of the novella Chronicle of a Death Foretold (1981). The materials document the gestation and changes of García Márquez’s works, revealing the writer’s struggle with language and structure…The archive will reside at the Ransom Center alongside the work of many of the 20th century’s most notable authors, including Jorge Luis Borges, William Faulkner, and James Joyce, who all influenced García Márquez.”

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Jorge Luis Borges Gets a Google Doodle

The great Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges has just received his own Google Doodle for his birthday. In the image (embedded above), the blind writer stares at the sprawling worlds he imagined in his books.

Read the late author’s long biography at this link. In his short stories, poems and essays, Borges explored imaginary libraries and focused on the way our books shape reality.

Here’s a quote from a 1971 interview with Borges at The New York Times: “When I began writing in the 1920′s in Buenos Aires, nobody thought of literature in terms of failure or success … You might publish an edition of 300 copies and these you gave away to your friends … People in this country may be idiotic, but they won’t be that idiotic–nobody would think of buying anything I’ve written.”

Authors Who Doodled

Flavorpill has collected the doodles of famous authors, including Sylvia Plath, David Foster Wallace, Vladimir Nabokov, Franz Kafka, Samuel Beckett, Allen Ginsberg, Mark Twain, Henry Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, and Jorge Luis Borges.

The drawings ranged from insect portraits to nightmare images. Wallace drew one of the funnier pieces, doodling glasses and fangs on a photo of Cormac McCarthy.

Vonnegut (pictured with his artwork, via) incorporated many of his drawings into his books. He even had his own art gallery exhibitions. What author should illustrate their next book?

Invisible Library Card

ink copy.jpgFrom June 12 until July 12, the London-based art collective Ink Illustration will host a new metafictional exhibit, creating book covers and text for books that only exist inside the pages of novels.

Last year imaginary literary scholars Levi Stahl and Ed Park created the Invisible Library, collecting scores of non-existent books that were mentioned in real novels. The collection included imaginary works alluded to in fiction by Jorge Luis Borges, Dorothy L. Sayers, Kurt Vonnegut, and many other authors. The London exhibit draws from 40 of these titles, illustrating the imaginary books.

Here’s more from the participatory exhibition: “Working with some of Real Fits best selling writers and novelists, as well as high profile cultural and musical figures, the opening or closing pages of these forty empty books with illustrated covers, will be penned in advance of the exhibition. The collaboration continues throughout the exhibition as gallery attendees and workshop participants are invited to temporarily ‘sign out’ these library books and carry on writing the developing narratives within. Thus by the close of the exhibition, the once blank pages of each book will be enlivened with imaginative poly-vocal stories.”