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Posts Tagged ‘Laurel Touby’

Bored to Death Creator Jonathan Ames Gives Screenwriting Tips

Jonathan Ames has written short stories, newspaper columns, and novels in his over twenty years as a writer and author.

In our Media Beat interview, he revealed how he added another title to his resume:  screenwriter and executive producer of HBO’s Bored to Death, a series based on his own short story about a writer turned private investigator.

“I read a number of scripts and I just quickly gleaned that you want to make the descriptions short and to the point and the dialogue lively,” Ames told mediabistro.com founder Laurel Touby. “I did learn as I went along to begin scenes late and end early. You don’t want people walking across the room a lot and ringing doorbells. You know, all that’s gonna chew up screen time and get thrown out anyway. It was just sort of adapting to a form, like adapting to a poetic form like a sonnet. What’s another one? A siesta. No, that’s a nap.”

Watch the full video for more tips (and humor) about Ames’ writing process and to find out why, despite his success, he’s still not ready to settle down.

Part 1: Bored to Death‘s Jonathan Ames on Sex, Insecurity and…Boxing?

Part 3: Jonathan Ames Brings “Jonathan Ames” to HBO’s Bored to Death

Mediabistro Course

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, learn how to get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

Sarah Ellison Makes Friends and Enemies with War at the Wall Street Journal

It goes without saying that your colleagues may not be too pleased to find out you’re writing a book about the inner dealings of the company. And when that company is as esteemed as the Wall Street Journal and said tome is an insider account of its sale to Rupert Murdoch, well, let’s just say you should probably start looking for another gig just in case.

“I mean, a lot of people I talked to did [like the book] and some didn’t,” said Sarah Ellison, author of War at the Wall Street Journal. “I feel like at the very top level of Dow Jones, I don’t think that the people who read it liked it.”

Ellison also told mediabistro.com founder Laurel Touby in the final segment of Media Beat how she was able to include so much detail about the main characters, including Rupert Murdoch.

“The day that Murdoch essentially fired Marcus Brauchli, I was traveling with him that day. And so that was a literal fly on the wall kind of thing. And I heard conversations. That was a level of detail where it was just a reporter’s dream.”

Part 1: Sarah Ellison Calls Wall Street Journal Sale ‘An Epic Clash of Cultures’

Part 2: Sarah Ellison on Writing War at The Wall Street Journal

David Kirkpatrick Releases ‘The Facebook Effect’

facebookeffect.jpgLast night publishing leaders, technology writers, magazine editors, and mediabistro.com founder Laurel Touby mingled at the glitzy book party for David Kirkpatrick. We missed the party, but received a dispatch and that photo of Kirkpatrick (via Gabriel Cid).

Here’s more about the party: “Miles Nadal, Chairman & CEO of MDC Partners, hosted a cocktail party last night celebrating the release of David Kirkpatrick‘s new book, The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World. The event was held at Michael’s Restaurant and was attended by Saul Hansell (noted technology writer), Andy Serwer (managing editor of Fortune), Dan Colarusso (Managing Editor of Bloomberg TV), and Priscilla Painton (Editor in Chief of Simon & Schuster).”

Next week, mediabistro.com’s video series MediaBeat will host a three-part interview with Kirkpatrick, talking about his new book, his magazine career, and how he turned his nonfiction reporting into a book deal.

Twitter Boot Camp Discount

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Next week @DunkinDonuts and @WholeFoods will join @FlashlightWorthyBooks for an all-day workshop about the mysterious, rapidly-expanding world of Twitter–and now, GalleyCat readers can get a $100 discount on the workshop.

O’Reilly Media will give readers $100 off the admission price for Twitter Bootcamp on Monday, June 15, 2009. Just enter the discount code: “GALLEY” at checkout. GalleyCat will be there, reporting on the bits of 140-character wisdom.

As GalleyCat editor Ron Hogan reported last month: “Tim O’Reilly and Sarah Milstein will be presenting their wisdom to a live audience in Manhattan, at “Twitter Boot Camp.” (Disclosure: mediabistro.com founder Laurel Touby is one of the scheduled presenters, and we’re looking forward to covering the event for GalleyCat.) ‘We’re thinking about this as a training day,’ Milstein told us, full of ‘useful, actionable information’ that should be of interest to corporate marketers, celebrities, authors, and any other public figures and institutions who want to stand out from the millions of other tweeters in the system.”

Well, I See By the Clock on the Wall…

Routine is a funny thing, especially on a professional level. It forces you to get up early every morning, perform a specific set of work-related tricks until the day is done, and then it’s time to get up early the next day and repeat the same process. For two years, routine has been my fall-back as I scoured for the best, relevant and occasionally bizarre bits of publishing-related news and commentary to share with GalleyCat readers.

After today, that routine will no longer exist. This is my last day here, after which Ron will take the site over as a solo act for the foreseeable future. Instead I’m creating a new routine, or perhaps an anti-routine: one with more freelance opportunities and larger projects to work on. One where I can spend more time on neglected matters: fiction-writing, my own crime fiction-centric site, or making some use of that forensic science degree after all. One with equal parts possibility and uncertainty. As to why now, the Jewish New Year – which begins tonight – probably has a lot to do with it. New Year, new beginnings, that sort of thing.

In other words: after two years, thousands of posts, scores of parties and readership that’s more than quadrupled since Ron and I took over GalleyCat in October 2005, it’s time to see what’s out there beyond the publishing industry’s idiosyncratic, mercurial and fascinating borders. I’m thrilled and scared, but risk has that effect on a person. And sad, too, because I’m going to miss so much here. When I first started, I had an amateur’s fascination with publishing. Now there’s more, but also so much I’ve still yet to learn. So most of all, thank you for being here as I tried to understand the way things work, from mergers & acquisitions (HM/Harcourt, Wottakar’s and Hachette/Time Warner Books, here’s looking at you) and bankruptcies (AMS/PGW) to more scandal-ridden fare (really, if not for James Frey, J.T. Leroy, Kaavya Viswanathan, and especially OJ and Judith Regan, there would be no GalleyCat in its current format.)

Thanks also to Elizabeth Spiers for the initial chance; Aileen Gallagher, Dorian Benkoil and Dylan Stableford for editorial support in the early innings and Rebecca Fox, Noah Davis and Chris Ariens for the same, late-in-the-game; Laurel Touby for continuing to push for breaking news and original content; my fellow bloggers-in-arms, departed and still current; and Ron, for being Adolph Green to my Betty Comden (even if I’m breaking up the act a lot sooner than they did.)

And while we’re on the team theme, had I been more tech-savvy there would have been a YouTube clip of my favorite childhood comedy duo delivering the goodbye song I reference in the subject header to open this post. But I’m not, so instead I’ll quote from the last lines:

Adieu, mon vieux, a la prochaine, goodbye till when we meet again!

Some sunny day, I suspect.