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Posts Tagged ‘Lydia Millet’

Free Samples of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalists

The finalists for the 33rd annual Los Angeles Times Book Prize have been revealed, and we’ve collected free samples of all their books below–some of the best books released in 2012. Here’s more about the awards:

“The winners of the L.A. Times book prizes will be announced at an awards ceremony April 19, the evening before the L.A. Times Festival of Books, April 20-21. Held on USC’s campus in Bovard Auditorium, the awards are open to the public; tickets will be made available in late March.”

 

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Mediabistro Course

Personal Essay Writing: Master Class

Personal Essay Writing: Master ClassStarting October 21, work with the senior editor at Marie Claire magazine to polish and publish your essay! Whitney Joiner will help you to develop your voice, narrative, and identity, draft your pitch, and decide where to market your essay. Register now!

Best Book Editors on Twitter

twitterlogo2323.jpgBook editors have had a rough time in recent years–layoffs, uncertain roles, and crazy workloads. To celebrate National Novel Editing Month and help aspiring writers connect with editors, we’ve updated our directory of the Best Book Editors on Twitter (collected below).

This list is not comprehensive, yet. Add your favorite editor (or yourself) to our growing list–because the digital future needs editors and we need to stay connected.

If you are looking for more people to follow, check out our Best Literary Agents on Twitter directory, our Best Book Editors on Twitter list, our Best Book Publicity and Marketing Twitter Feeds directory, our Best eBook News on Twitter list, our Best Library People on Twitter directory, and our Women in Publishing Twitter List.

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LibriVox Founder Launches Audiobook Company with Indie Press Offerings

LibriVox founder Hugh McGuire launched a new audiobook company today. Iambik Audio unveiled 11 new literary fiction audiobooks from indie publishers in the U.S. and Canada, including audiobooks for Gordon Lish and Lydia Millet.

The complete list of new audiobooks follows below. Prices range between $5 and $10 for the individual titles. Iambik Audio titles can be purchased on the website or through distribution partners like Audible, Overdrive, and eMusic.

Here’s more from the release: “Iambik aims to change the way commercial audiobooks are made. For audiobook listeners, Iambik will offer hand-picked collections of audiobooks … with no digital rights management—meaning they can be played on any computer or mobile device. For publishers and authors, Iambik approaches everything as a partnership, by promoting print and ebooks, as well as selling audiobooks, and by giving healthy royalties on all sales.”

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Paul Harding Wins 2010 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction

tinkers.jpgToday Paul Harding won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel Tinkers, a major award for an indie press operated out of the Bellevue Hospital Center.

The other finalists were Love in Infant Monkeys by Lydia Millet (Soft Skull Press) and In Other Rooms, Other Wonders by Daniyal Mueenuddin (W.W. Norton & Company). Here are the rest of the Letters, Drama and Music winners:

History–Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World by Liaquat Ahamed (The Penguin Press)

Biography–The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt by T.J. Stiles (Alfred A. Knopf)

Poetry–Versed by Rae Armantrout (Wesleyan University Press)

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Large Hadron Collider in Book Reviews

lhc.jpgThis morning the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) broke world records for smashing together elementary particles at high levels of energy–a physics project that has inspired a generation of authors with doomsday scenarios.

That photo (via CERN) shows scientists reacting to the experiment. To celebrate, GalleyCat Reviews rounded up reviews of books that use the Large Hadron Collider as plot device. Most famously, novelist Dan Brown wrote an apocalyptic scenario in Angels and Demons.

Here’s Janet Maslin‘s breathless review: “With ‘Angels and Demons,’ Mr. Brown introduced Robert Langdon, a Harvard professor of art history and religious symbology who is loaded with ‘what his female colleagues referred to as an ‘erudite’ appeal.’ No wonder: the new book finds the enormously likable Langdon pondering antimatter, the big-bang theory, the cult of the Illuminati and a threat to the Vatican, among other things.”

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The Art of Hypothetical Book Design

6a0128776de906970c01310f44f6ab970c-800wi.jpgToday part-time book designer Charlie Orr launched a unique project–designing a hypothetical book cover for a book that a well-known author will never write. “I ask authors to imagine a book that they could, or might want to write, but never actually will, then write a description of that imaginary book. Then I design a cover for it,” Orr explained.

His inaugural post is based on an imaginary book suggested by National Book Award winner Colum McCann. Follow this link to see the full cover. Future installments of The Hypothetical Library will include imaginary books by David Lehman, Lydia Millet, and Thomas Kelly.

Here’s the jacket copy for McCann’s imaginary book: “In the 17th Century vast numbers of Irish men, women and children were forcibly transported to the American colonies by the British government. In this spectacular reinvention and examination of history, Colum McCann goes to the heart one of the great untold stories of our times as he follows a group of Irish indentured servants on their voyage to the West Indies, their plight on the Atlantic seas, their subsequent serfdom and their eventual liberation on the wave of a bloody revolution. This is a gripping portrayal of another century, another continent, another loss, told in McCann’s unique trademark prose, simultaneously stripped down and lyrical.”

Michael Cunningham Sentence Animated

Today the bi-monthly literary journal Electric Literature released that bloody “Single Sentence Animation” video, as animator Jonathan Ashley interpreted a short short story from novelist Michael Cunningham.

This is the second single sentence animation posted on the journal’s brand-new YouTube page. Previously, animator Luca Dipierro interpreted Lydia Millet‘s “Sir Henry” in a brief video. Earlier this year, the journal made publishing headlines for its unusual distribution model and pledge to pay $1,000 per story.

Check it out: “This is the Electric Literature YouTube channel. Here you will find all kinds of cross-over projects. Whether we are matching contemporary writers with illustrators, fine artists, live-action filmmakers, or musicians, this is the place to see the results. These days, we’re on an animation kick. Enjoy.”

Literary Journal Meets Thrift Store

so.jpgLike a Salvation Army staffed by brilliant writers, Significant Objects has created a new kind of online journal–publishing and selling on eBay.

The new site pairs a writer with an odd object–a mug, a child’s game, or a ceramic cat. The author writes a story about the object, and the object and story are sold on eBay to the highest bidder. The amazing author list includes Luc Sante, Lydia Millet, Ben Greenman, Curtis Sittenfeld, and Stewart O’Nan.

Here’s more from the site: “The winning bidder is mailed the significant object, along with a printout of the object’s fictional story. Net proceeds from the sale are given to the respective author. Authors retain all rights to their stories.”

POD Literary Journal

electriclit.jpgThe brand new literary journal, Electric Literature, combines old and new media distribution models in a new kind of product. The magazine will be published as a digital text, with a print-on-demand option for readers looking for paper copies of the journal.

In addition, the journal can be purchased as an e-book, Kindle, or iPhone format. The opening issue features a blockbuster list with work by Jim Shepard, Lydia Millet, and Michael Cunningham.

Here’s more from the site: “Ultimately, the content of a book is information, and the methods of distributing information have changed. Electronic publishing is the greenest option: it kills no trees, requires very little energy, never goes out of print, and can reach anyone on the planet. To create the paper version of Electric Literature, we use print-on-demand, ensuring that every copy has a home.” (Via Patrick deWitt)