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Posts Tagged ‘Martin Luther King’

Free Books That Inspired Martin Luther King, Jr.

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s immortal “I Have a Dream” speech, we have collected links to free digital editions of the books that inspired the great leader’s life and writings. Follow this link to read and listen to a recording of the speech.

We’ve included some of his favorite books, but King also taught a Seminar In Social Philosophy at Morehouse College in 1961. We found the complete outline of his syllabus at The King Center’s massive archive.

Follow these links to explore more free eBooks at Project Gutenberg: our 50 Free eBooks To Be Thankful For list, our Free Books for Halloween collection, our Free Herman Melville books list, our Free Books That Inspired David Foster Wallace list and Free Books Neil deGrasse Tyson Thinks Everybody Should Read.

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Mediabistro Course

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, learn how to get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

Free Books That Inspired Martin Luther King, Jr.

As Americans celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, we have collected links to free digital editions of the books that inspired the life and writings of Martin Luther King, Jr..

We’ve included some of his favorite books, but King also taught a Seminar In Social Philosophy at Morehouse College in 1961. We found the complete outline of his syllabus at The King Center’s massive archive.

Follow these links to explore more free eBooks at Project Gutenberg: our 50 Free eBooks To Be Thankful For list, our Free Books for Halloween collection, our Free Herman Melville books list, our Free Edgar Allan Poe books collection, our Downton Abbey poetry reading list, our Free Bram Stoker collection and our Free Books That Inspired David Foster Wallace list and Free Books Neil deGrasse Tyson Thinks Everybody Should Read.

Read more

Maya Angelou Objects To MLK Monument Quote

Poet Maya Angelou is not a fan of the new Martin Luther King monument in Washington, DC (pictured, via). In a Washington Post article, the poet objected to the quote carved on the newly unveiled MLK monument.

The original King quote read: “If you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice. Say that I was a drum major for peace. I was a drum major for righteousness. And all of the other shallow things will not matter.” But it has been shortened to read “I was a drum major for justice, peace and righteousness.”

Here’s Angelou’s quote, from the article: “The quote makes Dr. Martin Luther King look like an arrogant twit … He was anything but that. He was far too profound a man for that four-letter word to apply.”

James Ellroy’s Secret History

As James Ellroy tours the country to support his new novel, “Blood’s A Rover,” GalleyCat caught up with the hardboiled writer to find more about the sprawling conclusion to his “Underworld USA Trilogy.”

The book begins in 1968 in Los Angeles, as a cast of crooked LAPD cops and obsessive FBI spooks infiltrate two fictional militant activist groups, the Black Tribe Alliance and the Mau Mau Liberation Front. While researching the interview, GalleyCat uncovered some vintage footage of a real raid on Black Panther headquarters in 1969 that turned LA into a war zone. This video essay mixes real footage with Ellroy’s interview.

Here’s more about the book, from the publisher: “Summer, 1968. Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy are dead. The assassination conspiracies have begun to unravel. A dirty-tricks squad is getting ready to deploy at the Democratic Convention in Chicago. Black militants are warring in southside L.A. The Feds are concocting draconian countermeasures. And fate has placed three men at the vortex of History.”

Dorothy Parker Anthology Lawsuit Trial Begins

The NYT’s Motoko Rich gives an overview of LA-based lawyer Stuart Silverstein‘s ongoing, long-running lawsuit against Penguin for using Silverstein’s book NOT MUCH FUN: THE LOST POEMS OF DOROTHY PARKER as an uncredited source for their own anthology. The issue in question is whether Silverstein is entitled to what is known as “compilation copyright” protection for his selection of Parker’s work. Four years ago the case went Silverstein’s way, and all copies of the Penguin anthology were supposed to be pulled. But then in 2004, the ruling was reversed – leading to the trial that begins today.

Interestingly enough, neither Silverstein nor Penguin will receive royalties -they all go to the NAACP, which got them after Parker left her estate to Martin Luther King, whose own estate went to the NAACP thereafter. Which is why David Shanks, chief executive of Penguin, said Silverstein’s suit was depriving the NAACP of royalties. “His suit and the injunction denies the NAACP the compensation Parker sought to provide it,” he told Rich by email. “Silverstein is simply seeking to personally profit from the sales of Parker’s poems.” Silverstein thinks otherwise. “If someone stole your car and offered to let you keep your vanity license plates,” he said, “would you consider that a fair offer?”