FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘Miguel de Cervantes’

Penguin Classics Coming to the Arabic Audiences

p2323.jpgPenguin Group (USA) and Egyptian publisher Dar El Shorouk have partnered to bring Penguin Classics to the Arabic world.

Some of the planned titles include Robert Louis Stevenson‘s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Miguel de CervantesDon Quixote, and Jonathan Swift‘s Gulliver’s Travels.

The Wall Street Journal interviewed Dar El Shorouk chairman Ibrahim El Moallem. Here’s an excerpt about censorship in the Arab world: “Mr. El Moallem said that presenting the Penguin library as a series of the world’s greatest books may help trump the censorship issue. In addition, while the books will be launched as printed physical copies, planned digital editions will prove difficult to repress.”

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Memoir Writing

Memoir WritingStarting January 7, work with a published memoir writer to tell and sell the story of your life! In this course, Wendy Dale will teach you how to create your story around a marketable premise, hone your narrative voice, write a memoir with a solid structure, and sell your memoir before you've even finished writing it. Register now!

Hugo Chavez Deploys “Book Squadrons”

9780142437230L.jpgIn Venezuela, President Hugo Chavez has launched a “Revolutionary Reading Plan.” Extending his book club urges, Chavez has given away thousands of free books and sent “book squadrons” around the country to urge citizens to read.

According to the BBC, the Venezuelan government has handed out thousands of free books, including “Don Quixote” by Miguel de Cervantes and “Les Miserables” by Victor Hugo, encouraging citizens to read to improve the country. Eager readers lined up in the capital city for “hundreds of meters” to get their free copies of the Hugo classic.

Here’s more from the article: “[A] key part of the Reading Plan are thousands of ‘book squadrons’ … Each squadron wears a different colour to identify their type of book. For example, the red team promotes autobiographies while the black team discusses books on ‘militant resistance.’” (Via Book Bench)

International Protect a Poet Day

200px-Shakespeare.jpgThe world lost six poetic souls on this date over the past few centuries, making April 23 a good day to protect (and appreciate) the poets you love.

As the Guardian notes, two of England’s greatest poets died today: William Shakespeare and William Wordsworth. In addition Spanish novelist and poet, Miguel de Cervantes, Welsh poet Henry Vaughan, English poet Rupert Brooke, and American songwriter Harold Arlen all died on this date.

Here’s more from the article: “Poets are notoriously sensitive souls, of course, so it could just be that if you’re a poet death is catching, like flu. That would explain, in a pseudo-scientific way, the number of dead poets littering the ground on 23 April.”