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Posts Tagged ‘Nathan Bransford’

Nathan Bransford Runs First Paragraph Writing Contest

Got a great first paragraph?

Share it on author Nathan Bransford‘s site and you could win the chance to have InkWell literary agent Catherine Drayton read part of your manuscript. All the Ultimate First Paragraph Challenge finalists will win a query critique from Bransford himself–the former literary agent has been helping aspiring writers polish pitches for years.

Check it out: “Please post the first paragraph of any work-in-progress in the comments section [at this link]. If you are reading this post via e-mail you must click through to enter. Please do not e-mail me your submission it will not count. The deadline for entry is this THURSDAY 7pm Eastern time, at which point entries will be closed. Finalists will be announced… sometime between Friday and the year 2078.”

Mediabistro Course

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, learn how to get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

7 eBook Price Points Defended

How much should an eBook cost? To give publishers and authors some guidance, we’ve collected spirited defenses of seven different eBook prices–choose the price that works best for your writing.

According to a new and unscientific poll, Nathan Bransford found that 51 percent of his readers thought eBooks should be priced between $5 and $9.99. What is your favorite price point?

$0.99 Novelist John Locke sold more than one million eBooks with this price point: “When I saw that highly successful authors were charging $9.99 for an e-book, I thought that if I can make a profit at 99 cents, I no longer have to prove I’m as good as them … Rather, they have to prove they are ten times better than me.”

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Mur Lafferty Collects $11,000 Beyond Her Kickstarter Goal

As of this writing, podcasting author Mur Lafferty has earned $11,000 more than she originally sought for her self-publishing project on Kickstarter. With 11 days to go, she already has more than 164 backers for her book.

Lafferty explained her how she calculated her goal in an interview with Nathan Bransford: “I took in my costs: $1,600 for the ebook conversion, but I had to remember there would be costs for Kickstarter (They get 5% if you’re successful) and the cost of the rewards (more about that later.) I also needed some software to transcribe Book 3, because I’ve lost that manuscript and have only the audio file. Lastly, I had to remember postage for reward fulfillment. OK, so I figured I’d shoot for $2,000, counting on the fact that I could probably make more than that because of my established audience who wanted the books, in case my math was wrong.”

Welcome to our Kickstarter Publishing Project of the Week, a feature exploring how authors and publishers are using the fundraising site to raise money for book projects. If you want to start your own project, check out How To Use Kickstarter to Fund Your Publishing Project.

Editor’s note: this post has been updated as the story evolved.

Nathan Bransford Leaves Curtis Brown & Joins CNET

Curtis Brown agent Nathan Bransford told his online community today that he will no longer be a literary agent.

He explained in a post: “I am leaving the world of publishing to work at the tech news/review site CNET, where I will be helping to coordinate social media strategy.” His clients had included Rebecca S. Ramsay, Brad Geagley, and Barry Gifford.

He also explained that his bustling online community will continue: “The blog and Forums will live on. The topics will change just a bit as I will no longer be in the query trenches, but I still plan to continue to post about writing, books, and whatever strikes my fancy (monkeys) and hope you’ll stick around for the next phase in the blog’s evolution. One thing that has not changed and will not change is my passion for books and writing and I hope this will continue to be a friendly place where writers come together to talk writing and help each other out. This has become such an amazing, positive community thanks to you, and I feel honored to be a part of it.” (Via Colleen Lindasy)

Agent-for-a-Week Contest

cb+logo.jpgCurtis Brown agent Nathan Bransford will make his readers literary agents next week, soliciting pitches from published and unpublished authors for readers to judge.

In order to simulate an overworked agent’s slush pile, Bransford will publish 50 pitches on Monday, April 13th, mixing professionally-accepted pitches with untested queries. His readers will have one week to judge, measuring their success rate against real agents.

Here’s more from the post: “You will read and respond to as many queries as you can. You will have one week to respond to all 50 queries. You can draft your own rejection letter and manuscript request letter (personalized or non-personalized, your choice), which you will paste in the comments section of each query … You may request no more than five manuscripts.”