FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘Nicholas Sparks’

Dan Mallory Heads to William Morrow

Dan Mallory will serve as the new executive editor at HarperCollins’ William Morrow imprint, leaving his post as editorial director at Little, Brown UK/Hachette’s Sphere. He will start the new position on October 8th.

Here’s more from the release: Dan has worked with many bestselling and renowned authors including Patricia Cornwell, Val McDermid, Louise Penny, Nicholas Sparks, and Mitch Albom, and launched The Crime Vault, a digital first crime/thriller imprint, and Trapdoor, a dedicated crime-in-translation imprint with Grand Central.

Mallory will acquire and edit books at William Morrow, but he will also launch a crime and thriller digital first line for the publisher.

Zac Efron Stars in ‘The Lucky One’ Trailer

Warner Bros. Pictures has released a trailer for the film adaptation of Nicholas Sparks‘ 2008 novel, The Lucky One. We’ve embedded the trailer in the video above–what do you think?

The movie will hit theaters in April 2012. Scott Hicks directed and High School Musical actor Zac Efron plays the lead role.

Here’s more from Indiewire: “[Efron] stars as a Iraq war veteran whose life is saved when he randomly stumbles across a picture of a woman in the desert sand, just before a bomb goes off. The kicker is that she’s like, totally hot. So he does what any sane and rational person does, he tracks her down, but instead of telling her his story, he takes a job on her farm/ranch/whatever, becomes involved in her life, makes sweet gauzy love to her and then winds up looking like a total douche when she finds out his secret before he tells her.” (via Shelf Awareness)

Forbes Unveils Highest Paid Authors List

This week Forbes published their annual list of the highest paid writers. Novelist James Patterson leads the pack with $84 million–a $14 million increase from last year.

Here’s more from the article: “The jump comes courtesy of a 17-book, $150 million deal Patterson signed with his publisher, Hachette Book Group, in 2009. The peerlessly prolific Patterson, who works with a team of co-authors to boost his output, published 10 of those books during this period. All told, including his backlist, he had an astonishing 20 titles on PW’s year-end lists of bestsellers, comprising more than 10 million copies.”

Like Patterson, Stephenie Meyer and John Grisham write both children’s and adult books; they both made the cut raking in $21 million and $18 million respectively. The authors on the list who write exclusively for children include Rick Riordan, Jeff Kinney, Suzanne Collins and J.K. Rowling. The list included three members of the Kindle Million Club. Below, you can check out the top five authors.

Read more

How Nicholas Sparks Wrote His First Novel

Even the most famous authors once struggled as aspiring writers.

GalleyCat contributor Jeff Rivera interviewed novelist Nicholas Sparks for mediabistro.com’s So What Do You Do? feature. The author shared some candid memories about his early days as a struggling writer.

Here’s an excerpt: “at 28-years-old, I had realized I didn’t want to move my family every couple of years. I also knew at the same time that I didn’t want to be a pharmaceutical rep for the rest of my life. So, I had an epiphany. I said, ‘Okay, I’m going to give writing another shot’ and you know, I came up with the story for The Notebook, and I had two small children at that time. I had from 9 a.m. to midnight to work and so I did, three or four days a week. Six months later, I had finished the novel. Three years prior to that, I hadn’t written a thing.”

Twilight Director Adapts Red Riding Hood

Catherine Hardwicke, the filmmaker who brought the first Twilight film to the big screen, has directed what appears to be a dark adaptation of Red Riding Hood. The trailer is embedded above.

David Johnson based his script on the Grimm Brothers‘ version of Little Red Riding Hood. Amanda Seyfried (star of the recent adaptation of Nicholas SparksDear John) stars alongside Gary Oldman (who co-starred in several Harry Potter films).

The tale of Little Red Riding Hood has existed for 700 years. The earliest known printed version was found in a 1697 story collection by French fantasy author Charles Perrault. The title in French is Le Petit Chaperon Rouge. (Via Ace Showbiz)

Eat, Pray, Love Book Sales See Big Hollywood Bump

eatpraysales.jpg

Today the Nielsen Company analyzed how Hollywood adaptations affect book sales, noting that the upcoming adaptation of Elizabeth Gilbert‘s Eat, Pray, Love generated some serious book sales.

Check it out: “Eat, Pray, Love has seen a rise in book sales, with 94,000 units sold in the week ending in August 1 alone, the same number of total units sold for the entire 2006 year, when the book was first published. So far, in 2010, the book has sold more than twice as many copies as all of 2009.”

The post also noted that the February adaptation of Dear John by Nicholas Sparks helped spur sales of more than 1 million copies in 2010. In addition, when the adaptation of My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult debuted in 2009, Nielsen counted the sale of 81,000 copies in a single week.

Nielsen Book president Jonathan Nowell explained: “While the literary world is often the source of creative content for Hollywood, the relationship is reciprocal, as we often see Hollywood releases boosting book sales.” The novel also ended up on the Home Shopping Network.

Miley Cyrus and Novelist Nicholas Sparks Join Forces

TM_725200973357AM.jpgIn a breezy USA Today feature, novelist Nicholas Sparks was interviewed alongside teen idol Miley Cyrus–talking about their collaboration in The Last Song.

The film is an adaptation of Sparks’ bestselling novel, but Cyrus offhandedly noted she hadn’t finished the book, resulting in a special fluffy film feature moment: “‘I’ve only gotten through part of The Last Song,’ Cyrus says sheepishly. ‘Because the movie started first.’ Sparks feigns being stricken, but then says: ‘I don’t know if I ever watched a Hannah Montana show. … Nothing personal. My daughters do every day.’”

Undoubtedly, the article will inspire some action in the GalleyCat comments section, as Sparks criticizes the pigeonholing of his work as “romance” and teaches Cyrus the difference between melodrama and drama. Check out all of Sparks’ adapted novels here. (Via Bookishly Fabulous)

Nicholas Sparks Adaptation Ends Avatar’s Epic Box Office Run

dearjohn23.jpgFor weeks, the film industry has debated what kind of movie would knock Avatar off the number one spot at the box office–the film had already survived vengeful angels, tooth fairies, and an angry Mel Gibson.

This weekend, the blue-skinned aliens were replaced by an unexpected contender–an adaptation without a single spaceship or fantastical mythology. In a shocking twist of fate, Avatar was topped by Dear John, a low-budget romance picture based on a novel by Nicholas Sparks.

Here’s more about the book: “An angry rebel, John dropped out of school and enlisted in the Army, not knowing what else to do with his life–until he meets the girl of his dreams, Savannah. Their mutual attraction quickly grows into the kind of love that leaves Savannah waiting for John to finish his tour of duty, and John wanting to settle down with the woman who has captured his heart. But 9/11 changes everything. John feels it is his duty to re-enlist. And sadly, the long separation finds Savannah falling in love with someone else.”

Writers Slash Their Not-So Favorite Books Into Pieces

halfbook.jpg

Earlier this month, Wall Street Journal theater critic Terry Teachout espoused the joys of brevity in books in his most recent “Sightings” column on Orion’s plans to publish abridged editions of classic novels. Now the New York Times’ Motoko Rich pushes the idea forward in a not-entirely-serious vein, asking writers like Christopher Buckley, Joyce Carol Oates, Norman Mailer and Jonathan Franzen to pick what books deserve to go under the editing knife. Mailer offered a list that he requested be printed in full and without commentary, while Neal Pollack suggested cutting “80 percent of THE NOTEBOOK by Nicholas Sparks and turn it into the greeting card that it was meant to be.”

Most controversial goes to Ann Patchett with her Orwell slams and most wimpy, easily, to Franzen, who applied the abridging logic only to titles, even if he got off some amusing zingers like “Shortmarch” and “Paler Fire.”

<< PREVIOUS PAGE