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Posts Tagged ‘Norman Mailer’

‘Less is not-less.’ Joyce Carol Oates Tweets About Twitter

 

The great author Joyce Carol Oates joined Twitter recently, and her feed has been filled with a long-form writer’s meditations on this new kind of online writing. Below, we’ve created a collection of her tweets about Twitter writing.

Tonight, Oates will receive the lifetime achievement award at the PEN Center USA’s Literary Awards Festival in Los Angeles.

Oates’ Twitter career began with the simple post embedded above: “Last night at the Norman Mailer Award Ceremony in NYC, Oliver Stone said beautifully: ‘A serious writer is a rebel.’” She also shared a great writing music recommendation last week: “Is anyone else haunted by Rachmaninoff’s ‘Vespers?’” Click here to listen to those classical choir pieces on Spotify.

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When Should Writers Work for Free?

When should writers work for free? It is one of the most difficult questions facing writers in the 21st Century as unpaid outlets multiply online.

In an interview at The Paris Review, we found a historic moment when famous authors wrote for free in a completely unknown publication. When the legendary editor Robert Silvers launched The New York Review of Books in 1962, he went straight to the most talented writers in the country and asked them to work for free.

Check it out:

Our thought was to think of the best writers in the world to review the books of the season—even people who hadn’t written book reviews for years or ever. Many of them we knew—Norman Mailer, [William] Styron, W. H. Auden, Edmund Wilson. We said, “Look, we have three weeks, we can’t pay a penny, will you do it?” And they all did.

Norman Mailer’s Son to Adapt ‘The Deer Park’

In the 1980s, novelist Joan Didion collaborated with her late husband John Gregory Dunne on a script for Norman Mailer‘s novel, The Deer Park. The adaptation has collected dust ever since.

Now Mailer’s son, film producer Michael Mailer, wants to shoot the Didion-Dunne screenplay. According to The Daily, Mailer will collaborate with producers Cassian Elwes and Matt Palmieri on this project.

Here’s more from the article: “The Deer Park chronicles two romances during Hollywood’s Red Scare era. It was rejected as obscene by Mailer’s publisher in 1955.” Norman Mailer (pictured, via) adapted The Deer Park into a stage play. It opened off-broadway in 1967 and ran for 128 performances.

Norris Church Mailer Has Died

Author Norris Church Mailer passed away on Sunday. She was 61-years-old.

Mailer was born Barbara Jean Davis. She wrote a memoir called A Ticket to the Circus and two novels, Windchill Summer and Cheap Diamonds. She was married to the late author Norman Mailer for 27 years.

Random House offered this tribute to her literary life: “In 1975, she was living in Russellville, Arkansas where she was a painter and taught high-school art; she had also written about a hundred pages toward a novel (which she would later reshape into Windchill Summer and publish in 2000). She had read Norman Mailer’s biography of Marilyn Monroe, and in 1975 attended an Arkansas party for him. Subsequently, they dated, had one son whom they named John Buffalo in 1978, and were married in New York city in 1980. She took on her former married name as first name, ‘Norris,’ and took Mailer’s suggestion of ‘Church,’ evoking her intensive religious upbringing, as a surname.”

Wylie Agency Forms New eBook Imprint

wylie.jpgThe Wylie Agency decided to strike out on its own this week, publishing 20 eBooks through the literary agency’s brand new Odyssey Editions imprint. These new books will be published exclusively through the Amazon Kindle Store, revealing why Andrew Wylie said eBook deals were “currently on hold across the board” last month.

The first wave of eBooks contain some of the 20th Century’s most important titles: Portnoy’s Complaint by Philip Roth, The Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison, and The Naked and the Dead by Norman Mailer. These books will be sold for $9.99, all of them available for the first time in eBook format. See the complete list after the jump.


Andrew Wylie
had this statement: “As the market for e-books grows, it will be important for readers to have access in e-book format to the best contemporary literature the world has to offer … This publishing program is designed to address that need, and to help e-book readers build a digital library of classic contemporary literature.”

UPDATE: Other publications analyze the news:
New York Times
Publishers Weekly
Teleread
Future Book
Enhanced Editions
A Reading Odyssey

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Details: Gen X Men Do Read Books

details.jpgToday Details magazine unveiled the 25 Greatest Gen X Books of All Time, giving GalleyCat an exclusive peek at the picks. The colorful list includes everything from “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” by Junot Diaz to “Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American Consensus” by Rick Perlstein.

GalleyCat caught up with Details‘ Deputy Editor Chis Raymond to find out more about the list. He explained the cutoff age for writers: “After a lot of heated discussion, we ended up settling on 1960 as the cut-off date. That, of course, meant guys like William T. Vollmann didn’t make the cut, which launched a whole new round of arguments. But that’s what makes the project fun. We wanted to point out that there were some literary giants who were born after John Updike and Norman Mailer. But you can’t name every one.”

Finally, he argued against the stereotype that men don’t read books: “I don’t buy that argument. Men may not buy as many books as women, but we read. We read the the Wall Street Journal and Malcolm Gladwell‘s New Yorker stories and Bill Simmons’ column on ESPN.com. If a story’s good enough to merit our attention, we’ll find it and read it. Just look at the features in men’s magazines. They’re often much meatier than the fare you find in women’s magazines. What does that tell you? That guys aren’t afraid to spend an hour reading a great piece of writing … And because Details readers are sophisticated when it comes to modern media, they can appreciate the confessions of Motley Crue every bit as much as Dexter Filkins on the Iraq War.”

NBF Will Celebrate Gore Vidal and Dave Eggers

nba.jpgThe National Book Foundation (NBF) announced that Gore Vidal will receive the 2009 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters and Dave Eggers will receive the 2009 Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community.

Both awards will be given out at the 60th National Book Awards Ceremony in New York City on November 18, an evening hosted by writer and actor Andy Borowitz. Vidal will be the twentieth author to receive his prestigious award, which was shared by writers like Joan Didion, Norman Mailer, and Toni Morrison.

National Book Foundation executive director Harold Augenbraum had this statement: ““Vidal and Eggers have made a significant impact on the literary culture of the United States, in two very distinct eras. Although one could call both ‘men of letters,’ their approaches to their craft and to their writing and public lives can be described as very distinctive models of the American artiste engagé.” (Editor’s note: The headline of this post has changed.)

Norman Mailer on the Moon

cover_ce_mailer_moon_0905281606_id_179644.jpgForty years ago, Life magazine gave Norman Mailer a plum assignment: writing essays to accompany the magazine’s gorgeous photos of the moon landing. Now Taschen is selling a $1,000 coffee table book collecting that historic work, an ego-boosting price-tag that Mailer would have appreciated.

The Book Beast explores the literally weighty book, entitled “Norman Mailer, Moonfire.” For the cash-strapped literary types in the audience, the Harry Ransom Center gave a virtual peek at Mailer’s notes and research for the book.

Check it out: “Moonfire is a gloriously imposing tome, large enough to require a degree of exertion just to flip it over. Inside, in addition to a reproduction of Mailer’s book, are scans of his original manuscript, and photographs that, decades after that Space Age began to feel dated, still boggle the mind. Taschen will print only 1,969 copies of the book–each will be signed by Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, and the final 12 will contain a chip of extremely rare moon meteorite.”

John Wray’s Michiko Kakutani Tattoo

tattoo.jpg
Few literary critics inspire emotion like NY Times critic, Michiko Kakutani. Some worship her reviews, and others, (like Norman Mailer) wished they could change her mind. Last night, novelist John Wray took the cult of Kakutani to a new level–unveiling this magic marker tattoo.

As part of the Happy Ending Music & Reading Series, founder Amanda Stern requires all performers to take a risk. Joined on stage at Joe’s Pub by Wells Tower, Arthur Phillips, and the band, Vampire Weekend, Wray had some tough competition. Nevertheless, his full-back tattoo read “KAKUTANI 4 EVAH,” eliciting gasps, laughter, and cheers from the audience.

After the jump is an exclusive video of Wray’s performance and tattoo unveiling, complete with a Vampire Weekend chaser. Tune in later today for more music and footage from the event.

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LongPen To Debut in Bookstores

After limited success with Margaret Atwood‘s device at the Edinburgh Book Festival – enabling Norman Mailer and Alice Munro to make “appearances” – the book-tour substitute device will make its debut into a record store and several bookstores in Canada, the United States and England for a trial run that could bring fans and their idols closer together. The London Free Press reports that kiosks will be set up at the World’s Biggest Bookstore and HMV‘s flagship record store in Toronto, Barnes & Noble in New York and Waterstone’s in London beginning after Labour Day, and could expand elsewhere if successful.

Spokesperson Bruce Walsh says shops with a LongPen kiosk could soon become hubs for celebrity sightings of a new kind. “You could potentially see the talent in their dressing room, somewhere, and they could actually sign into a bookstore,” says Walsh. “It doesn’t really matter, if there’s a kiosk set up, you can sign all kinds of different kinds of talent into wherever the kiosk happens to be.” But tech observer Richard Worzel of Toronto was skeptical the device — with a fee of roughly $2,000 in Canada and the U.S. and $4,000 in England — would be worth it to a publisher promoting a new artist. “Something like this, you’d have to show quite a lot of demand,” said Worzel.

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