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Posts Tagged ‘Rob Weisbach’

Minnesota Vikings Player Inks Book Deal for Personal Essay Collection

Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe has landed a book deal with Little, Brown for Beautifully Unique Sparkleponies, “a collection of uncensored personal essays on topics ranging from faith to government, from losing in professional athletics to human rights.”

Publication is set for June 25, 2013. Rob Weisbach at Rob Weisbach Creative Management negotiated the deal. Executive editor John Parsley will edit. Kluwe earned 2.3 million views on Deadspin earlier this year for an angry letter railing against one politician’s “vitriolic hatred and bigotry.”

Here’s more from the release: “The politician thought a football player had no place standing up for gay rights, and Kluwe was outraged and wrote a point by point deconstruction of his argument. Not your average pro athlete, Kluwe is committed to supporting gay marriage and has even posed shirtless in Out magazine, but he is a straight husband and father of two. He is a football player who turned down Harvard. He is a gamer, a geek, passionate, and shockingly sharp-tongued—and he either gets readers’ heads nodding with him or makes them explode.”

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Kevin Costner Lands Book Deal

Actor Kevin Costner has signed a book deal with Simon & Schuster’s Atria Books imprint for an adventure series. It begins with The Explorers Guild, Volume One: Passage to Shambhala in 2014. The book is aimed at a broad group of readers, ranging from “young adult to more mature mystery and adventure enthusiasts.”

Writer and art director Jon Baird (pictured, left) also worked on the project with Costner (middle), which will be illustrated by Rick Ross (right). Rob Weisbach and Fonda Snyder at Rob Weisbach Creative Management negotiated the deal with publisher Judith Curr. Atria senior editor Sarah Durand and assistant editor Daniel Loedel will edit the book.

Here’s more from the release: “Behind the staid rooms of an old world gentlemen’s club operates a darker, more mysterious organization: The Explorers Guild, a clandestine group of adventurers who seek out the places where light gives way to shadow and reason is usurped by myth … Set against the backdrop of World War I, with Western Civilization spiraling into chaos, the first installment in The Explorers Guild series, A Passage to Shambhala, concerns the Guild’s quest to find Shambhala, the golden city of Buddhist myth. Each member is driven toward the City for a different reason: one believes that finding it will save his brother’s life; another hopes that it will reveal a path to spiritual enlightenment. Some believe the power of the city can be used to restore peace, while others are certain that Shambhala is responsible for bringing mankind to the brink of apocalypse.”

Chris Colfer Inks Deal with Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Glee star Chris Colfer has signed a two-book deal with Little, Brown Books for Young Readers. His middle grade novel, The Land of Stories, will be released in summer 2012. A publication date for the untitled follow-up has not been announced.

Deputy publisher Andrew Smith and editorial director Alvina Ling negotiated the deal with literary agent Rob Weisbach of Rob Weisbach Creative Management. Ling will edit the book. The video embedded above features Colfer performing a duet with his Glee co-star Darren Criss.

Here’s more from the press release: “A fast-paced adventure that uniquely combines our modern day world with the enchanting realm of classic fairytales, The Land of Stories tells the tale of twins Alex and Conner Bailey. Through the mysterious powers of a cherished book of stories, Alex and Conner leave their world behind and find themselves in a foreign land full of wonder and magic where they comeface-to-face with the characters they grew up reading about.”

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Lauren Manning to Publish 9/11 Memoir

World Trade Center attack survivor  Lauren Manning has landed a book deal with Henry Holt and Company to publish her memoir, Every Day, a Choice.

Here’s more about the book, from the release: “Ten years ago this September 11, Ms. Manning was headed to her office at Cantor Fitzgerald in Tower One of the World Trade Center. As she entered the lobby’s revolving doors the first plane hit the upper floors and a wall of fire exploded into the lobby and engulfed her body in flames, launching her into a wrenching battle with catastrophic injury. She would spend the next six weeks in an induced coma and endure countless surgeries and the rigors of physical rehabilitation. The pain lasted for months on end, as did the memories and scars – both physical and mental – of the day that recast her life, but not as a victim, as a survivor.”

Henry Holt publisher Stephen Rubin acquired the title and Rob Weisbach of Rob Weisbach Creative Management negotiated the deal. Macmillan editor at large John Sterling will edit the book. In 2002, her husband (Greg Manning) documented her recovery in the book, Love, Greg & Lauren.

Paul Reiser Lands Book Deal for ‘Familyhood’

Actor Paul Reiser has inked a deal to publish Familyhood with Hyperion. The book will follow-up on his last two bestsellers, Couplehood and Babyhood.

Publication is set for May 2011, coinciding with the launch of his upcoming NBC sitcom, The Paul Reiser Show. Reiser’s sons are now 10 and 15-years-old, and the comedian will meditate on “parenting, marriage, and midlife.” Editor-in-Chief negotiated the deal Rob Weisbach at Rob Weisbach Creative Management represented the actor and Hyperion EIC Elisabeth Dyssegaard acquired the book. Executive editor Gretchen Young will edit.

Reiser had this statement: “After many years of trying to master the art of being a great husband and father, I’ve decided to write this book so my children will finally have all the proof they need that I have no idea what I’m doing.”

Random House Revolving Door Widens Editorial and Marketing/Distribution Dichotomy

Last week’s post about Daniel Menaker‘s exit and the larger implications for Random House served as unwitting inspiration for Sara Nelson‘s column in this week’s issue of Publishers Weekly. After recapping what she terms (and I concur is) a “stunning” number of job switcheroos at Random House, Nelson wonders if all the gossip and chatter misses the overall point: that none of the departing RH executives, going back to Don Weisberg, the COO of RH North America who left in February, were replaced with external hires:

That…suggests that Random is indeed shifting focus, but not necessarily in fiction. At worst, the piling on of new jobs to longtime staffers with already full plates is a form of downsizing; at best, it might be that Random, like most publishers, will soon move its emphasis from the acquiring/editing side of the business to the less sexy but increasingly important distribution and marketing side. Editors and authors will always matter-somebody, after all, has to create all that “content” that will be disseminated in forms perhaps not yet invented—but the focus these days is more on selling direct, on digital “product” and on POD.

Nelson’s larger point is a good one, but I suspect that emphasis already began quite a number of years ago, and not just at Random House. Most of those at the executive level – and by that I mean Publisher, CEO or something in between – tend to come up from the marketing, distribution and publicity sides, and yet if a new imprint is formed, it’s usually named after its founding editor (most recent examples: Spiegel & Grau at Doubleday/Broadway; Amy Einhorn Books at Putnam. At least Twelve, Jonathan Karp‘s imprint at Grand Central Publishing, was never going to be named after him.) Eponymous editorial imprints seem to follow a common trajectory: a big announcement spurring a flurry of news, commentary and speculation; an 18 month or so gestation marked by sprees of acquiring not out of place at 5th Avenue department stores; and after a few years – best personified by the fate of Rob Weisbach‘s imprint at William Morrow in the late 1990s – a near-permanent place in the loss-leading category for the publisher. Never mind the irony that the most successful eponymous imprint, ReganBooks, is no more, shuttered in favor of the more anonymous (and temporary) “HC” logo.

So if, as Nelson concludes, publishing houses’ energies are moving even more strongly towards the “less sexy” side of publishing, perhaps it may make sense to question the wisdom of imprints named after editors – especially when in the end – with the exception of one Ms. Judith Regan – they are just as anonymous to readers as are the marketing & distribution people. In other words (and keeping the elemental theme going) maybe it’s not a question of air or water but earth and fire.

Regan a Clef and More Publishing-Inspired Books

AP’s Hillel Italie is the latest reporter to profile Bridie Clark and her debut novel BECAUSE SHE CAN. No matter how much she and Warner Books, the book’s publisher, swear up and down that the dragon-lady boss character, Vivian Grant, bears no resemblance to Judith Regan, about the only major difference is that Grant is a blonde and Regan’s a brunette. But the piece is more fun for who gets quoted about the paucity of insider-ish novels about our favorite industry. “It isn’t that kind of business,” says Jason Epstein, a longtime editor with Doubleday and Random House whose many authors have included Norman Mailer and E.L. Doctorow. “It’s very gentlemanly, and there isn’t a lot of scandal to write about. You publish a book, it sells or it doesn’t sell, and then you publish another one.”

Other editors who get ink include Rob Weisbach (who namechecks Adam Davies‘ THE FROG KING as a publishing-drenched novel and praises Clark for her good editing skills!) and Robert Gottlieb, who cited Herman Wouk‘s YOUNGBLOOD HAWKE, a 1961 novel about a publishing sensation who lives fast and dies faster. “But publishing is not a glamorous business,” Gottlieb says. “It involves people sitting home and reading long manuscripts and then putting their pencils on the paper and making notations. Someone may set a novel in the publishing industry, but I don’t see it as the basis for a strong novel.”

Strong, no; vivid, yes, but then there are certain scenes in Olivia Goldsmith‘s THE BESTSELLER that are impossible to clear from our heads…