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Posts Tagged ‘Robert J. Sawyer’

Anne McCaffrey Has Died

Fantasy novelist Anne McCaffrey has passed away. She was 85 years old. GalleyCat confirmed the sad news with Random House this afternoon.

McCaffrey’s career began with Restoree in 1967. She went on to earn a dedicated following for her beloved series, Dragonriders of Pern. At her website, McCaffrey answered letters from dedicated fans through November. This GalleyCat editor will never forget reading her books as a middle-school kid. Share your memories in the comments section…

You can read her complete biography at her site. An excerpt: “Her first novel, Restoree, was written as a protest against the absurd and unrealistic portrayals of women in s-f novels in the 50s and early 60s. It is, however, in the handling of broader themes and the worlds of her imagination, particularly the two series The Ship Who Sang and the fourteen novels about the Dragonriders of Pern that Ms. McCaffrey’s talents as a story-teller are best displayed.”

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Nonfiction Book Proposal

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Hugo Award Nominees Announced

hugoaward.pngOver the weekend, the nominees for the Hugo Awards were announced.

Here’s more about the prize: “The Hugo Awards, to give them their full title, are awards for excellence in the field of science fiction and fantasy. They were first awarded in 1953, and have been awarded every year since 1955. The awards are run by and voted on by fans.”

Here are the nominees for Best Novel:

Boneshaker by Cherie Priest (Tor)
The City & The Cityby China Mieville (Del Rey; Macmillan UK)
Julian Comstock: A Story of 22nd-Century America by Robert Charles Wilson (Tor)
Palimpsest by Catherynne M. Valente (Bantam Spectra)
Wake by Robert J. Sawyer (Ace; Penguin; Gollancz; Analog)
The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi (Night Shade)

More nominees after the jump…

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Large Hadron Collider in Book Reviews

lhc.jpgThis morning the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) broke world records for smashing together elementary particles at high levels of energy–a physics project that has inspired a generation of authors with doomsday scenarios.

That photo (via CERN) shows scientists reacting to the experiment. To celebrate, GalleyCat Reviews rounded up reviews of books that use the Large Hadron Collider as plot device. Most famously, novelist Dan Brown wrote an apocalyptic scenario in Angels and Demons.

Here’s Janet Maslin‘s breathless review: “With ‘Angels and Demons,’ Mr. Brown introduced Robert Langdon, a Harvard professor of art history and religious symbology who is loaded with ‘what his female colleagues referred to as an ‘erudite’ appeal.’ No wonder: the new book finds the enormously likable Langdon pondering antimatter, the big-bang theory, the cult of the Illuminati and a threat to the Vatican, among other things.”

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Robert J. Sawyer on FlashForward and the Future

rsawyer.jpgAdaptation is a tricky question for contemporary science fiction authors. To find out more, we caught up with a prominent author currently wrapped up in a high-profile adaptation.

Today’s guest on the Morning Media Menu was Hugo Award-winning science fiction writer Robert J. Sawyer–talking about his novel and the television show FlashForward, a television show based on his novel by the same name. Sawyer discussed the future of the show and the new level of interaction that writers have with their readers–delivering some advice for authors hoping to foster stronger relationships with their fans.

Here’s an excerpt: “It used to be books were a very small audience compared to television. What’s happened, as I mentioned, is television audiences are getting smaller and smaller and book audiences, at the high end, are getting bigger and bigger. It is truth–as no one could have said 40 years ago–more people have read the blockbuster novel of 2009 than have watched the top-rated TV show of 2009. But in fact, we live in that world.”

Sawyer continued: ” The reality of being able to reach out and actually interact with readers has been enormously valuable for me. All the different ways of interacting with people makes them feel proprietary about the work. They feel like they are part of the process, and that’s good–they are great encouragements and helps to me.”

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